Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/21. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis after rocky mountain spotted fever.

    Although acute disseminated encephalomyelitis has been observed after a variety of viral infections and an occasional bacterial infection, it has not been reported in association with rickettsial infections. Reported is a 7-year-old male with magnetic resonance images and clinical manifestations suggestive of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis after a tick bite and serologically proven rocky mountain spotted fever.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tick bite, tick, bite
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/21. Consequences of delayed diagnosis of rocky mountain spotted fever in children--west virginia, michigan, tennessee, and oklahoma, May-July 2000.

    patients with rocky mountain spotted fever (RMSF), a tickborne infection caused by rickettsia rickettsii, respond quickly to tetracycline-class antibiotics (e.g., doxycycline) when therapy is started within the first few days of illness; however, untreated RMSF may result in severe illness and death. persons aged <10 years have the highest age-specific incidence of RMSF. This report summarizes the clinical course and outcome of RMSF in four children from four regions of the United States and underscores the need for clinicians throughout the United States to consider RMSF in children with rash and fever, particularly those with a history of tick bite or who present during April-September when approximately 90% of RMSF cases occur.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1630042233082
keywords = tick bite, tick, bite
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/21. rocky mountain spotted fever and pregnancy: a case report and review of the literature.

    The classic triad of fever, headache, and characteristic rash occurring 1 to 2 weeks after a tick bite in an endemic area should raise suspicions for rocky mountain spotted fever (RMSF). All providers with primary care responsibility for women should be familiar with the diagnosis and treatment of this illness. As a recent case illustrates, the diagnosis of rocky mountain spotted fever may be complicated by pregnancy. Several conditions of pregnancy have similar presentations to the initial, often nonspecific manifestations of RMSF. Although doxycycline is the recommended therapy for children and nonpregnant women, chloramphenicol remains the recommended therapy for women during pregnancy. The time of year, local prevalence, and patient's exposure history may be taken into account when deciding to treat during pregnancy. Vertical transmission of RMSF has not been documented in humans. Prevention of RMSF by avoidance of tick-infested areas or by the use of insect repellents and long clothing is recommended for all patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1630042233082
keywords = tick bite, tick, bite
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/21. Fever and rash in a 3-year-old girl: rocky mountain spotted fever.

    Initial symptoms of rocky mountain spotted fever (RMSF), a tick-borne illness caused by rickettsia rickettsii, are nonspecific and include headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, malaise, and myalgias, followed by fever and rash. The classic triad of fever, rash, and history of tick exposure is uncommon at presentation. Clinical manifestations of RMSF range from virtually asymptomatic to severe. Because of the potentially fatal outcome of RMSF, presumptive clinical diagnosis and empiric antimicrobial therapy can be critical. We present the case of a 3-year-old girl from new york State who presented with fever and rash.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.32600844661644
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/21. rocky mountain spotted fever: a clinician's dilemma.

    rocky mountain spotted fever is still the most lethal tick-vectored illness in the United States. We examine the dilemmas facing the clinician who is evaluating the patient with possible rocky mountain spotted fever, with particular attention to the following 8 pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment: (1) waiting for a petechial rash to develop before diagnosis; (2) misdiagnosing as gastroenteritis; (3) discounting a diagnosis when there is no history of a tick bite; (4) using an inappropriate geographic exclusion; (5) using an inappropriate seasonal exclusion; (6) failing to treat on clinical suspicion; (7) failing to elicit an appropriate history; and (8) failing to treat with doxycycline. early diagnosis and proper treatment save lives.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1630042233082
keywords = tick bite, tick, bite
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/21. rocky mountain spotted fever as a cause of macular star figure.

    An 86-year-old woman with a history of tick bites in the previous months developed subnormal visual acuity in both eyes, keratic precipitates, anterior chamber and vitreous cells, optic disc edema, retinal hemorrhages, and retinal arteriolar sheathing. She had no fever or skin rash. Three weeks later, binocular macular star figures appeared. brain imaging was negative; cerebrospinal fluid disclosed a lymphocytic pleocytosis and elevated protein. The serum rickettsia rickettsii antibody test was markedly positive, establishing a diagnosis of rocky mountain spotted fever (RMSF) as the cause of the ophthalmic findings. Despite treatment with oral doxycycline, these findings improved only modestly. Although neuroretinitis has been previously described in RMSF, macular star has not been documented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tick bite, tick, bite
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/21. Rickettsia parkeri: a newly recognized cause of spotted fever rickettsiosis in the United States.

    ticks, including many that bite humans, are hosts to several obligate intracellular bacteria in the spotted fever group (SFG) of the genus Rickettsia. Only rickettsia rickettsii, the agent of rocky mountain spotted fever, has been definitively associated with disease in humans in the United States. Herein we describe disease in a human caused by Rickettsia parkeri, an SFG rickettsia first identified >60 years ago in Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) collected from the southern United States. Confirmation of the infection was accomplished using serological testing, immunohistochemical staining, cell culture isolation, and molecular methods. Application of specific laboratory assays to clinical specimens obtained from patients with febrile, eschar-associated illnesses following a tick bite may identify additional cases of R. parkeri rickettsiosis and possibly other novel SFG rickettsioses in the United States.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1654922684812
keywords = tick bite, tick, bite
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/21. Fatal cases of rocky mountain spotted fever in family clusters--three states, 2003.

    rocky mountain spotted fever (RMSF), a tickborne infection caused by rickettsia rickettsii and characterized by a rash, has a case-fatality rate as high as 30% in certain untreated patients. Even with treatment, hospitalization rates of 72% and case-fatality rates of 4% have been reported. This report summarizes the clinical course of three fatal cases of RMSF in children and related illness in family members during the summer of 2003. These cases underscore the importance of 1) prompt diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial therapy in patients with RMSF to prevent deaths and 2) consideration of RMSF as a diagnosis in family members and contacts who have febrile illness and share environmental exposures with the patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16300422330822
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/21. Myocardial involvement in rocky mountain spotted fever: a case report and review.

    rocky mountain spotted fever (RMSF), caused by Rickettia rickettsii, is a serious tickborne illness that is endemic in the southeastern united states. Although it is most commonly known as a cause of fever and rash, it can have systemic manifestations. The myocardium may rarely be involved, with symptoms that can mimic those of acute coronary syndromes. This report describes a case of serologically proven RMSF causing symptomatic myocarditis, manifested by chest pain, elevated cardiac enzyme levels, and decrease myocardial function. After treatment with antibiotics, the myocarditis resolved. Thus, although unusual, the clinician should be aware of myocardial disease in patients with appropriate exposure histories or other clinical signs of RMSF. Close monitoring and an aggressive approach are essential to reduce mortality rates.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16300422330822
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/21. A rickettsial mixed infection in a dermacentor variabilis tick from ohio.

    We present the first report of superinfection in a dermacentor variabilis tick from nature. The single tick, collected in ohio, was found infected with Rickettsia belli, R. nontanensis, and R. rickettsii.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.97802533984933
keywords = tick
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.