Cases reported "Root Resorption"

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1/5. A novel multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of an intruded immature permanent incisor.

    The optimal treatment for intruded permanent teeth has not yet been determined. The ideal treatment option is the one with the lowest probability of developing complications such as external root resorption and marginal bone loss. Each case should be considered individually, bearing in mind the severity of the intrusion, the stage of root development, and tooth mobility. Management of an intruded permanent tooth may consist of: (1) observation for spontaneous eruption; (2) surgical crown uncovering; (3) orthodontic extrusion (with or without prior luxation of the intruded tooth); (4) and partial surgical extrusion, immediately followed by orthodontic extrusion and surgical repositioning. The purpose of this article was to review the treatment options for intruded immature permanent incisors, and to present a new modality of an elective internal strengthening of the immature root weakened by external root resorption. A case of an intrusive luxation injury in a 7 1/2-year-old child and the resulting complications utilizing this technique is described. This is the first known report in the pediatric dentistry literature of performing an elective (preventive) internal strengthening of an immature root weakened by severe external inflammatory resorption. The child was followed for 5 years with an excellent clinical outcome. This technique should be considered for treatment of immature permanent teeth with thin cervical root dentin and external or internal root resorption due to trauma or caries.
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keywords = dentistry
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2/5. Can the severity of root resorption be accurately judged by means of radiographs? A case report with histology.

    INTRODUCTION: root resorption of lateral incisors caused by the pressure of erupting canines is a well-known but relatively rare problem in orthodontics and general dentistry. It is usually diagnosed on radiographs. The purpose of this article is to discuss some difficulties associated with evaluating root resorption from radiographs alone. A case report is presented as an example. methods: Radiographs showed that an 11-year-old girl had marked root resorption of the maxillary lateral incisors, caused by the impacted permanent canines. The incisors were to be extracted. Several months before the extractions, a canine had been surgically exposed to remove pressure from the incisor root. The lateral incisors were analyzed histologically, and the histologic findings were compared with those of the patient's mandibular first premolars, which had been extracted. RESULTS: The resorption of the lateral incisors was more severe than expected from the radiographs. The resorption extended far into the pulp. Most, although not all, root resorption areas showed histologic evidence of repair, but the amount of repair was far from functional repair levels. The mandibular first premolars had no signs of resorption, thus excluding systemic causes. CONCLUSIONS: The severity of root resorption of lateral incisors cannot be accurately judged from radiographs alone.
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keywords = dentistry
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3/5. Surgical repositioning of traumatically intruded permanent incisor: case report with a 10-year follow up.

    This report describes the case of a 10-year-old boy that was referred to the pediatric dentistry clinic 15 days after sustaining a severe traumatism that led to complete intrusion of the maxillary left mature permanent central incisor. The intruded tooth was repositioned by using surgical extrusion. Endodontic therapy was performed with calcium hydroxide-based paste as root canal dressing and root canal filling was performed with a calcium hydroxide-based root sealer and gutta-percha points. The postoperative course was uncomplicated, with both clinical and radiographic success up to 10 years of follow up. In this case surgical repositioning combined with endodontic therapy constituted a viable alternative treatment for intrusive luxations in mature permanent teeth.
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keywords = dentistry
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4/5. Endodontic and restorative management of a resorbed eight-unit fixed partial denture abutment tooth: report of case.

    Treating internal resorption is one of dentistry's most difficult challenges. This pathological process is difficult to manage in an advanced stage. The usual treatment involves surgery or, in many cases, extraction of the resorbed tooth. It is often difficult for the patient to understand and accept such a radical treatment approach. This report of case illustrates severe internal resorption that destroyed a major portion of a key abutment tooth supporting an eight-unit fixed partial denture. The resorptive pathosis was treated by a nonsurgical endodontic approach. The severely damaged abutment was reinforced and restored so that the existing eight-unit fixed partial denture could be preserved. The patient was pleased with the method of treatment and was commended for seeking regular recall professional care. It would have been easy to postpone treatment as the problem was asymptomatic. However, to do so probably would have resulted in loss of the resorbed abutment tooth, thus creating a complex restorative situation. The original prosthesis is currently 14 years old, functioning well, and showing no apparent evidence of pathosis. Costly and time-consuming remake procedures were avoided and patient satisfaction was maintained.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dentistry
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5/5. Paediatric dentistry avulsion: case reports.

    Children may present at a dental surgery for management of oro-facial injuries. Most general dental practitioners are able to handle straightforward cases but referral may be required for complex injuries. Successful healing following tooth avulsion depends on the amount of damage to teeth and supporting structures, emergency treatment, and follow-up treatment. All of these play a role in the long-term prognosis of avulsed teeth.
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ranking = 4
keywords = dentistry
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