Cases reported "Root Resorption"

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1/110. Root canal treatment of a root-fractured incisor tooth with internal resorption: a case report.

    A case is described in which root canal treatment with calcium hydroxide was used successfully to repair a fracture site with internal resorption of the tooth.
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2/110. Forced eruption: a multidisciplinary approach for form, function, and biologic predictability.

    There are several treatment options for patients with coronal fractures, subgingival caries perforations, and root resorption. Frequently, forced eruption is not considered, although in many cases of single-rooted teeth, forced eruption is the "gold standard" for producing an esthetic result without jeopardizing periodontal support for adjacent teeth. Sufficient tooth length, achieved through forced eruption, ensures the periodontal health of the "biologic width" and crown margin and thus a successful restorative outcome.
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3/110. root resorption: another long-term outcome.

    Case history is presented of an indigenous Zambian girl. Initial surgical repositioning is shown and at a later stage when the tooth had erupted into the nasolabial vestibule and an orthodontic correction was performed. Surgical trauma as well as orthodontic forces may have precipitated root resorption; however, the aim of saving a tooth has been achieved.
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4/110. Tooth root resorption associated with a familial bone dysplasia affecting mother and daughter.

    The dental findings are presented of a mother and daughter who suffer from an as yet unclassified bone dysplasia that shows features of both hereditary hyperphosphatasia and familial expansile osteolysis. Both patients have experienced progressive root resorption of permanent teeth, deafness, and high alkaline phosphatase levels. The mother has a more advanced bone dysplasia which has led to progressive skeletal deformity and bone pain. The kindred is consistent with an autosomal dominant pattern, and the mutation(s) is thought to be in chromosome 18q21-22 region. Conventional treatment strategies of root resorption offer only a poor prognosis for the dentition. Therapy using alendronate, a bisphosphonate compound and a potent inhibitor of osteoclastic activity, has reduced alkaline phosphatase levels, bone pain, and may offer an effective strategy to prevent tooth root resorption in this group of diseases.
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5/110. Management of an avulsed primary incisor.

    The case describes the management of an avulsed maxillary central primary incisor of a 3 1/2-year-old girl. The tooth was retained in the oral cavity for 30 min. After replantation it was splinted for 17 days. At day 11 the root canal was completely instrumented and obturated with a calcium hydroxide paste. The 1-year follow-up documented no pathologic clinical or radiographic findings. One and a half years after the trauma the tooth was extracted since a fistula and extensive external inflammatory resorption had developed. The permanent successor erupted along with its neighboring central incisor without any complications 6 months later. Conventional approaches for treating avulsed permanent teeth could also be applied to avulsed primary incisors to preserve them for a certain period without the additional risk of damaging their developing permanent successors.
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6/110. Deposition of calcified tissue around an overextended gutta-percha cone: case report.

    CASE REPORT: Root canal treatment was performed in a mandibular right second premolar with a periapical lesion and apical resorption. The root canal was prepared with K-files using the step-back technique and 3% NaOCl as an irrigant; during obturation gross overfilling of gutta-percha occurred. The tooth was permanently restored with a post and core along with a crown. Although healing of the periapical lesion occurred and the patient reported that he was symptom-free, the tooth was extracted after 4 years because of a subgingival root fracture. Following extraction the tooth was examined with SEM. The examination revealed the presence of newly formed calcified tissue at resorption sites on the root apex. This newly formed tissue extended from the surface of the root around the apex to the extruded gutta-percha cone to which it was well adapted, forming a bridge between the cone and the root.
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7/110. root resorption and signs of repair in Papillon-Lefevre syndrome. A case study.

    The aim of this investigation was to describe some tooth-related histological features of prepubertal periodontitis. Teeth extracted during treatment of two Papillon-Lefevre syndrome patients were processed by means of the sawing and grinding technique. light microscopy examination revealed little or no cementum in the coronal parts of the roots. Resorptions of various depths (0.02 to 1.5 mm) and to various extents (affecting up to 1/3 of the root surface) were observed in the 5 investigated teeth. Some resorptive defects on 1 of the examined incisors showed signs of spontaneous repair. Extrinsic fibers were inserted into the new cellular intrinsic fiber cementum which had formed directly on the bottom of the defect. Intact acellular extrinsic fiber cementum was found where fibers were still attached. Here, the characteristic of pristine cementum, a hyaline layer of peripheral dentin, could be identified. If resorption was not present, the cementum did not show any signs of hypoplasia. Thus, histological features of prepubertal periodontitis in the current material were (i) areas of extensive resorption, (ii) signs of spontaneous repair, and (iii) healthy cementum.
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8/110. Contemporary treatment of the resorbed avulsed tooth: a case report.

    This report describes the treatment sequence after traumatic loss of a maxillary central incisor in a 15-year-old patient. Following extraoral root canal treatment and initially successful replantation, the case presented 9 years later with complete root resorption. After augmentation with an autologous mandibular corticocancellous graft, a dental implant was placed in a second stage surgery. The case highlights the challenge facing clinicians in providing the appropriate standard of care for today's treatment options.
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9/110. Complete replacement resorption after replantation of maxillary incisors: report of case.

    This article describes the treatment of a 17-year-old patient with complete root resorption of the maxillary permanent central and lateral incisors following avulsion and replantation seven years ago. The most important factor influencing the prognosis of replanted teeth is the status of the periodontal ligament (PDL). As a result of replantation, the PDL cells necrosed and tooth replacement resorption occurred. The main factors, which affected the resorption after replantation and survival of PDL cells, could be summarize as; dry extraoral time greater than 30 minutes, the kept tooth in a dry environment, touching the cementum surface, and splint treatment for a prolonged time. Since complete root resorption was found in our case, these factors probably also occurred.
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10/110. Successful root coverage: a human histologic evaluation of a case.

    connective tissue grafts combined with pedicle grafts (subepithelial grafts) have been shown to be effective in obtaining root coverage. Unfortunately, little is known about the histology of the results in humans. This is a case report of a tooth with a recession defect that was treated with a subepithelial graft. Complete root coverage was obtained. However, at 5 months postoperative the tooth had to be extracted because of a vertical root fracture. With the patient's permission, a small collar of tissue was removed with the tooth. The sample was processed and evaluated histologically. The results revealed areas of regeneration, with new bone, cementum, and connective tissue attachment coronal to the original gingival margin. No bone grafts or guided tissue regeneration membranes were used. This case report confirms that regeneration is possible with subepithelial grafts.
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