Cases reported "Rupture, Spontaneous"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/208. Spontaneous bladder rupture: rare cause of peritonitis.

    Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder is an uncommon, but important, cause of generalized peritonitis. It is a surgical emergency which may be rapidly fatal if diagnosis and treatment are delayed. Bladder disease or obstruction, coupled with a sudden increase in intra-abdominal pressure usually accounts for the rupture. Characteristic symptoms are acute lower abdominal pain followed by generalized peritonitis. In most cases, the rupture is intra-peritoneal.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = intra-abdominal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/208. Ruptured tuboovarian abscess in late pregnancy. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Tuboovarian abscess is an unusual obstetric complication that causes maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. CASE: A woman, G1, P0, with a 32-week pregnancy presented with abdominal pain. physical examination on admission revealed fever and unremarkable abdominal signs. Eleven hours after admission, signs of peritonitis became prominent, necessitating emergency laparotomy. Surgical findings included an 8-cm, right, ruptured tuboovarian abscess with massive purulent contamination of the abdominal cavity. Cesarean hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Neither the newborn nor the mother had postoperative complications. CONCLUSION: Since there are discrepancies in the incidences of tuboovarian abscess in pregnant and nonpregnant groups, the pathogenesis of tuboovarian abscess may be different in the two populations. In pregnancy, diagnosis and management are also more difficult than in the nonpregnant state. Clinical data may not reveal the diagnosis until surgery is mandatory. Because most pregnant women with tuboovarian abscesses are young, conservative surgery should be attempted if the pathology is limited to only one side of the adnexa and further reproduction is desired.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 11.319143730036
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/208. Non-traumatic liver rupture due to a perforated gastric ulcer.

    The case of a 57-year-old woman with a fatal liver rupture due to a necrotizing perihepatic abscess caused by a perforated gastric ulcer is presented. The ulcer had been treated successfully by surgical intervention 8 days before. The autopsy revealed a large perihepatic abscess and multiple ruptures of Glisson's capsule with a large subcapsular hematoma and underlying lacerations of the liver parenchyma. The patient had no history of previous abdominal trauma and the known etiological factors for spontaneous liver rupture were excluded by the autopsy findings or by clinical and laboratory data. No liver penetration by the gastric ulcer was found at autopsy and there were no clinical signs or symptoms for an infection or any degenerative or inflammatory diseases. Histologically abundant vegetable fibers, identified as stomach contents and a dense infiltrate of lymphocytes and granulocytes were found in the perihepatic abscess next to Glisson's capsule. Below Glisson's capsule there were hemorrhages, focal hepatocellular necrosis and a mixed cell inflammatory infiltration. In the present case, preceding perforation of the gastric ulcer with leaking of gastric acid into the peritoneal cavity resulted in peptic digestion of Glisson's capsule. Vascular lesions of the affected parts of Glisson's capsule and the liver parenchyma underneath resulted in intrahepatic hemorrhage and an increase in intrahepatic pressure with subsequent liver rupture. To the authors' knowledge no similar case of spontaneous liver rupture due to perforation of a gastric ulcer has been reported previously.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.7730479100122
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/208. appendix abscess: a surgical giant presenting as a geriatric giant.

    CASE REPORT: A women aged 102 years presented with falls and was found to have an atypical presentation of appendicitis. CONCLUSION: This illustrates the non-specific presentation of disease in old age and the importance of a careful medical assessment of people who have fallen.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5.0307305466829
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/208. Accidentally delayed diagnosis of ruptured ovarian carcinoma in a young woman: a care report.

    Ovarian carcinoma commonly occurs in postmenopausal women and often presents with an insidious course. Acute abdomen is rarely an initial symptom. When these patients present with abdominal discomfort, the disease has already spread throughout the peritoneal cavity. We present a case of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma in a young woman who presented with acute abdomen and intra-abdominal bleeding. This 24-year-old woman was previously diagnosed with a ruptured left ovarian cystic tumor at a primary clinic. She underwent emergency exploratory laparotomy, followed by unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy at the clinic. No thorough examination of the peritoneal cavity was done during surgery. The diagnosis of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma was accidentally over-looked until one month later when she returned for routine follow-up. Upon referral to our clinic, the patient underwent a repeat laparotomy. The surgicopathologic diagnosis was intraperitoneal carcinomatosis stage IIIC that could not be excised completely, even though rigorous staging surgery including washing cytology, total abdominal hysterectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy, retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy, appendectomy, infracolic omentectomy and excision of any suspicious and removable lesions were performed. This case alerts us to consider the possibility of ovarian malignancy when a young woman presents with an acute abdomen secondary to ruptured ovarian cystic tumor and intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Careful preoperative preparation and thorough intrasurgical examination of the peritoneal cavity along with a prompt pathologic diagnosis of suspicious lesions will prevent missed diagnoses.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = intra-abdominal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/208. Ultrasonographic evaluation of pericholecystic abscesses.

    Pericholecystic abscess formation is a serious complication of cholecystitis that develops after gallbladder perforation and is usually associated with acute inflammatory signs and symptoms. Ultrasonographic findings in three surgically proven cases of pericholecystic abscess are reported. The findings ranged from a well defined band of low-level echoes around the gallbladder to multiple, poorly defined hypoechoic masses surrounding an irregular, indistinct gallbladder outline. The former situation correlated with a well encapsulated pericholecystic inflammatory process, while the latter was associated with extensive abscess formation resulting from gallbladder rupture. cholelithiasis was identified in two of the three cases. Ultrasound for preoperative detection of pericholecystic abscess is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 10.061461093366
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/208. Subvalvular left ventricular aneurysm following mitral valve replacement.

    Two cases are presented which represent different aspects of damage to the posterior wall of the left ventricle following mitral valve replacement. In the first case rupture of the ventricle occurred in the immediate postoperative period with a fatal result, while in the second, delayed aneurysm formation occurred with embolic and haemodynamic complications. This patient also did not survive. A review of the literature reveals four similar cases previously recorded. Possible aetiological factors are considered, including operative trauma, ischaemic damage, rupture of unsupported muscle, previous surgery with the development of pericardial adhesions and fixing of the valve ring, and finally abscess formation. The indications for operative intervention and possible complications of the aneurysm are noted.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2576826366707
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/208. Mechanic intestinal obstruction--a possible presentation of perforated appendicitis.

    A 61-year-old man presented with diffuse abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting and fever. On the initial diagnosis of gastroenteritis the patient received the antibiotic ofloxacine for one week. On admission plain abdominal radiograph suggested a mechanic intestinal obstruction. In computed tomography a conglomerate tumor in the ileocecal region was seen and the patient underwent laparotomy. The conglomerate tumor was mobilized and an abscess opened, which was caused by a perforated appendicitis. After the operation the patient improved immediately and had an uneventful postoperative course. He was released and did not suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms the following 16 months of follow-up. The present case shall set forth that perforated appendicitis can clinically present as intestinal obstruction. Although a rare complication, perforated appendicitis should therefore even be considered in cases of mechanic intestinal obstruction of unknown cause.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2576826366707
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/208. Unilateral chronic tuboovarian abscess secondary to ruptured colonic diverticulum presenting as a brain abscess. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Tuboovarian abscesses (TOAs) are a somewhat unusual finding in postmenopausal patients without risk factors. We present a rare case of unilateral TOA initially presenting as a brain abscess in a postmenopausal woman. CASE: A 61-year-old woman presented with a complaint of forgetfulness, nausea and vomiting, with lower abdominal pain and diarrhea. She was found to have a brain abscess, which was treated by craniotomy, with drainage of the abscess, and intravenous antibiotics. The patient was subsequently found to have a pelvic mass, which, on laparotomy, was a unilateral TOA. pathology demonstrated that the abscess contained vegetable matter consistent with origin in a ruptured diverticulum. CONCLUSION: Diagnosis of a brain abscess should prompt a thorough investigation for a primary infectious source, including the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 17.60755691339
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/208. Ruptured klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess after high-dose cyclophosphamide for severe aplastic anemia.

    A 19-year-old woman with severe aplastic anemia who had previously failed antithymocyte globulin/cyclosporine A received high-dose cyclophosphamide without bone marrow rescue. On day 14, she complained of right upper quadrant abdominal pain and fever. A CT scan of the abdomen showed multiple liver abscesses with rupture and klebsiella pneumoniae was isolated from blood. In spite of aggressive antibiotic therapy, she rapidly deteriorated and died of overwhelming sepsis. To our knowledge, our patient is the first case of fatal ruptured liver abscess after high-dose cyclophosphamide in a patient with severe aplastic anemia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.5460958200243
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Rupture, Spontaneous'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.