Cases reported "Rupture, Spontaneous"

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1/14. Calyceal rupture and perirenal urinoma as a presenting sign of recurrent ovarian cancer.

    BACKGROUND: rupture of the urinary collecting system with peripelvic extravasation of urine is an uncommon pathologic condition usually associated with ureteral obstruction from calculi. CASE: We report a patient with calyceal rupture and peripelvic extravasation of urine secondary to distal ureteral obstruction by recurrent ovarian carcinoma. diagnosis was established with computed tomography and renal scans. Placement of an indwelling ureteral stent via a nephrostomy resolved the urinoma. CONCLUSION: Gynecologic oncologists should be aware that calyceal rupture is a potential complication of gynecologic malignancy. Causes of perirenal urinary extravasation and approaches to diagnosis and management are reviewed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
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2/14. Two episodes of hemoperitoneum from luteal cysts rupture in a patient with congenital factor x deficiency.

    The clinical manifestation of two episodes of hemoperitoneum from ruptured corpus luteum cysts, during the luteal phase of the cycle in a young patient with the rare congenital factor x deficiency, is reported for the first time in literature. The correct diagnosis of the underlying disorder, the gynecological management and the regular follow-up can minimize the risks of this potentially life-threatening hematological disorder.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
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3/14. pneumoperitoneum without perforation of the gastrointestinal tract.

    pneumoperitoneum (PP) is usually the result of perforation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract with associated peritonitis. However, other rare causes, including spontaneous PP incidental to intrathoracic, intra-abdominal, gynecologic, and miscellaneous other origins not associated with a perforated GI tract have been described in the literature. Six cases of PP without any perforated GI tract are reported. Three patients with generalized peritonitis underwent exploratory laparotomy or laparoscopy when clinical examinations suggested an acute abdomen. At surgical procedure, perforated pyometra, perforated liver abscess and a ruptured necrotic lesion of a liver metastasis were documented in these patients, respectively. We also saw 3 PP patients not associated with peritonitis. Two patients with PP caused by pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis were encountered, 1 was managed conservatively and the other received diagnostic laparoscopy. A patient in whom pneumomediastinum and pneumoretroperitoneum were accompanied by PP caused by an alveolar rupture based on decreased pulmonary compliance due to malnutrition was managed conservatively. The history of the patient and knowledge of the less frequent causes of PP can possibly contribute towards refraining from exploratory laparotomy in the absence of peritonitis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
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4/14. Hemorrhagic corpus luteum mimicking heterotopic pregnancy.

    Hemorrhagic corpus luteum (CL) is clinically known to simulate a number of medical, surgical and gynecologic conditions that cause acute abdomen. One such case is hereby presented that mimicked ectopic pregnancy clinically and heterotopic pregnancy on ultrasound. laparoscopy was decisive.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
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5/14. Can you find the source of her pain?

    BACKGROUND: The features of abdominal pain in this gravid patient mimicked more common diagnoses like preterm labor, chorioamnionitis, and appendicitis. CASE: A 40-year-old multipara presented at 30 weeks and 6 days with abdominal pain. The cause was not discovered until the time of cesarean delivery several days after admission. CONCLUSION: This common gynecologic problem can precipitate severe problems in a pregnant woman and should be considered part of the diagnosis in pregnant patients presenting with pain.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
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6/14. Embolic management of rare hemorrhagic gynecologic and obstetrical conditions.

    Severe life-threatening hemorrhage was controlled by angiographic management in 3 patients with bleeding due to unusual gynecological abnormalities and in 1 patient with a rare obstetrically related hemorrhage. Successful management of such rare causes of bleeding emphasizes that early angiographic intervention can, in selected patients, reduce the need for an immediate or subsequent surgical procedure and allow conservative management followed by disease-specific therapy.
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ranking = 5
keywords = gynecologic
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7/14. An unusual cause of right lower quadrant pain in a prepubertal child.

    The clinical course of a five-year-old girl with right lower abdominal pain is presented. The differential diagnosis of right lower quadrant abdominal pain in a prepubertal child and a discussion of this child's diagnosis, ovarian torsion, are provided. The need always to consider gynecologic disease in any female patient presenting with a history of colicky lower abdominal pain or an acute abdomen is emphasized.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
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8/14. The gravity suit: a major advance in management of gynecologic blood loss.

    We have used the gravity suit (G-suit) to stabilize patients in shock as a result of ruptured ectopic pregnancies. Four patients presenting in shock were carefully studied with serial vital signs, fluid replacement, and blood loss before and after application of the G-suit. These studies were continued through surgery and the removal of the G-suit. The G-suit improved vital signs, increased peripheral organ and limb perfusion, and decreased blood loss in all cases.
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ranking = 4
keywords = gynecologic
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9/14. Ruptured appendix after elective abortion. A case report.

    abdominal pain and fever after an uncomplicated elective abortion usually point to incomplete abortion and endometritis. We treated a woman for acute suppurative appendicitis one week after such an abortion. When fever, nausea, vomiting and pain are not relieved by the standard doses of medication, acute appendicitis must be added to the usual gynecologic differential diagnoses.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
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10/14. Ruptured benign cystic teratomas mimicking gynecologic malignancy.

    Ruptured benign cystic teratomas of the ovary mimicking gynecologic malignancy are uncommon, but frequently misdiagnosed. Two cases are reported that, preoperatively, were believed to represent ovarian carcinoma, but were found to have diffuse granulomatous peritonitis, secondary to perforation of the teratomas. Intra-abdominal adhesions and/or masses are frequent sequelae. A diagnosis of malignancy must be confirmed prior to performing radical surgery. A review of the literature is presented.
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ranking = 5
keywords = gynecologic
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