Cases reported "Rupture"

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1/12. Repair of pulmonary vein rupture after deceleration injury.

    Injuries to the major pulmonary vessels are uncommon and are extremely difficult to manage. We report a case of an isolated pulmonary vein injury following a road traffic accident that was repaired successfully.
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keywords = deceleration
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2/12. Blunt traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta: a report of an unusual mechanism of injury.

    Classic teaching suggests that blunt thoracic aortic rupture (BTAR) results from high-speed deceleration injury mechanisms. Our recent experience with a patient who sustained fatal aortic rupture resulting from a low-speed crushing injury emphasizes the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for BTAR, even in patients with "low-risk" injury mechanisms. Several potential pathophysiologic mechanisms of BTAR are discussed.
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keywords = deceleration
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3/12. Rupture of the supradiaphragmatic inferior vena cava by blunt decelerating trauma: case report.

    lacerations of the inferior vena cava resulting from blunt external trauma are relatively rare, but extremely serious. The high lethality is due to the difficulty in diagnosis and technical problems with repair, particularly if the injury is located above the renal veins. During a 12-month period seven patients with inferior vena cava laceration were seen, of whom two presented with laceration of the inferior vena cava above the diaphragm. Both had a deceleration injury while wearing seatbelts. The clinical presentation was similar. The etiology is discussed. Caval continuity should be repaired because acute sudden occlusion at the suprahepatic level is incompatible with survival. Median sternotomy is advised, moreover it provides good exposure for eventual cannulation.
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keywords = deceleration
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4/12. Disruption of a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt by rapid deceleration injury.

    A case is presented of an 8-year-old child who had tension hemothorax after disruption of a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt 2 weeks postoperatively. A rapid deceleration mechanism was responsible for the injury.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = deceleration
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5/12. Traumatic rupture of extracardiac valved conduit: unusual late complication producing outflow tract obstruction.

    A 22-year-old woman died suddenly 15 years after successful repair of truncus arteriosus with a valved Dacron conduit. At autopsy there was complete obstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract by a large organizing thrombus between the outer aspect of the conduit and the adherent pericardial tissue. This rare late complication may have resulted from an unrecognized deceleration injury occurring at the time of a serious automobile accident 5 months before death.
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keywords = deceleration
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6/12. Embolotherapy of a ruptured internal mammary artery secondary to blunt chest trauma.

    A unique case of traumatic rupture of the internal mammary artery secondary to blunt deceleration injury of the chest is reported. The injury, which produced changes consistent with great vessel disruption on the plain chest radiograph, was treated by percutaneous transcatheter embolization of Gianturco steel coils. The importance of surveying all arteries visualized during thoracic aortography in patients with widened mediastinum following deceleration injury to the chest is reinforced. Embolotherapy of this noncritical chest wall vessel is demonstrated.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = deceleration
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7/12. Intrauterine rupture of the umbilical cord during delivery.

    Two cases of bleeding from ruptured umbilical vein during delivery are reported. In one case the rupture was spontaneous, leading to fetal distress. In the second case the rupture was probably iatrogenic, and was caused by forceps delivery. Bleeding from ruptured umbilical vessel should be considered when a combination of variable decelerations during fetal heart rate monitoring, blood-stained amniotic fluid and fetal distress are detected during delivery.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = deceleration
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8/12. Avulsion of the triceps tendon.

    Avulsion of the triceps tendon should be suspected in patients who have pain about the elbow following a deceleration stress to the upper extremity. In three cases, the avulsion occurred both with or without a concomitant blow to the posterior aspect of the arm. Examination revealed pain, swelling, and a palpable depression just proximal to the olecranon. Roentgenograms showed avulsed osseous material. In the evaluation and management of triceps avulsion, it was important to differentiate between complete and partial tears. Careful examination of active range of motion of the elbow was the most important factor in making this determination. An avulsion was considered partial only if normal elbow motion and extension against resistance were found on follow-up examination a few days postinjury. Nonoperative management was successful in one case of partial tear (Case 2). Surgical therapy was advisable for complete avulsions. Surgical repair was successful using heavy nonabsorbable suture through olecranon drill holes. Injuries of tendon avulsion and rupture are likely to become more common as the number of patients with chronic renal failure, on dialysis, increases. Tendo-osseous weakness and related musculoskeletal disorders in renal osteodystrophy patients are unsolved problems.
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keywords = deceleration
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9/12. Traumatic rupture of the intestine in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Three young patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease were admitted to our hospital during the past year for extensive intestinal rupture caused by disproportionately minor trauma. There was almost no concomitant intra-abdominal injury. We believe that a minimal direct or acceleration/deceleration trauma to a preexisting diseased intestine might have caused extensive damage that was not apparent on admission. It was concluded that these patients should be carefully monitored and that their relative intestinal vulnerability should be borne in mind during diagnosis of and therapeutic planning for their condition.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = deceleration
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10/12. Subadventitial rupture of the splanchnic arteries as the result of blunt abdominal trauma presenting with acute gastric dilatation.

    Two patients are reported who presented with intestinal ischaemia caused by a subadventitial rupture of the origin of the coeliac trunk and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries after blunt trauma from deceleration injury. In both cases the initial clinical examination revealed a painful abdomen without any 'peritonism'. Abdominal ultrasonographic examination showed no abnormality. Plain abdominal radiography showed gastric dilatation in both patients. In the first, the diagnosis was made by laparatomy but only after 2 days. In the second, diagnosis was made by aortography performed because of the early appearance of gastric dilatation. Both patients died as a result of extensive associated injuries and delay in diagnosis.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = deceleration
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