Cases reported "Rupture"

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1/54. Complete disruption of the female urethra.

    PURPOSE: We report a rare condition of complete rupture of the bladder neck with an anterior vaginal laceration secondary to blunt pelvic trauma in a 19-year-old woman. methods: Management consisted of a suprapubic cystostomy, followed by end-to-end anastomosis 3 days later. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: After 6 months, the patient is continent without any urinary disturbances.
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keywords = neck
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2/54. Isolated longitudinal rupture of the posterior tracheal wall following blunt neck trauma.

    The authors report 3 female children (4, 5 and 12 years old) who suffered an isolated rupture of the posterior tracheal wall (membranous part) following a minimal blunt trauma of the neck. Such tracheal ruptures often cause a mediastinal and a cutaneous thoraco-cervical emphysema, and can also be combined with a pneumothorax. The following diagnostic steps are necessary: X-ray and CT of the chest, tracheo-bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy. The most important examination is the tracheo-bronchoscopy to visualize especially the posterior wall of the trachea. Proper treatment of an isolated rupture of the posterior tracheal wall requires knowledge about the injury mechanisms. The decision concerning conservative treatment or a surgical intervention is discussed. In our 3 patients we chose the conservative approach for the following reasons: 1) The lesions of the posterior tracheal wall were relatively small (1 cm, 1.5 cm, 3 cm) and showed a good adaptation of the wound margins. 2) No cases showed an associated injury of the esophageal wall. All of our patients had an uneventful recovery, the lesion healed within 10 to 14 days, and follow-up showed no late complications.
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ranking = 5
keywords = neck
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3/54. Multivascular trauma on an adolescent. Perioperative management.

    Penetrating vascular injury, in particular at the neck, is a life-threatening trauma not only of the nature and the anatomic proximity of cardiovascular, aerodigestive, glandular and neurologic system but also of the development of early and late complications. The following case report describes our experience with a penetrating wound patient, who was admitted to our emergencies twelve hours after the accident. The only demonstrable objective signs included a large hematoma at the right-side of the neck and distended mediastinum on the chest X-ray. As the patient was cardiovascularly unstable he was immediately transported to the theater without any angiography. The mandatory operative exploration was initially unsuccessful and a median sternotomy with a standard cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia circulatory arrest was established to restore all the vascular lesions. Actually, the patient was in critical condition with a rupture of the right internal jugular vein, a large pseudoaneurysm of the innominate artery and an avulsion of the ascending aorta with the suspicion of a cardiac tamponade. The postoperative period lasted two full months, while complications appeared. The substantial message from this multivascular trauma is the early diagnosis of the life-threatening complications as exsanguinations, ventricular fibrillation and the ability to minimize postoperative complications, which will impair the normal functional life of the patient.
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ranking = 2
keywords = neck
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4/54. Irreducible palmar metacarpophalangeal joint dislocation due to junctura tendinum interposition: a case report and review of the literature.

    Three different anatomic structures have been reported to prevent reduction of a palmar dislocation of metacarpophalangeal joint: dorsal capsule, palmar plate, and a ruptured collateral ligament. In our case, extensor digitorum communis of the fifth finger and extensor digiti minimi subluxated on the ulnar side of the fifth metacarpal neck. Extensor digitorum communis of the fourth finger remained in its anatomic location. The junctura tendinum connecting the fourth and fifth extensor digitorum communis tendons slipped distal and then palmar to the metacarpal head, where it was trapped between the metacarpal neck and the base of the proximal phalanx. It was easily pulled out and the joint promptly reduced. Residual subluxation persisted due to rupture of the radial collateral ligament and the dorsal capsule. Repair restored joint reduction and stability. (J hand Surg 2000; 25A:166-172.
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keywords = neck
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5/54. Traumatic basal subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery--case report.

    A 20-year-old male presented with traumatic basal subarachnoid hemorrhage after being involved in a fight. Antemortem clinical examinations could not exclude the possibility of rupture of abnormal blood vessels because of the absence of external injuries. Careful postmortem examination of the head and neck regions and histological examination of the intracranial arteries demonstrated traumatic rupture of the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery due to a fist blow to the jaw. This case indicates the need for careful autopsy examination for the differentiation of traumatic and non-traumatic basal subarachnoid hemorrhages.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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6/54. Traumatic rupture of the thyroid gland.

    A 24-year-old male presented with marked neck swelling following direct neck trauma. Imaging diagnosed a rare case of traumatic thyroid rupture.
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keywords = neck
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7/54. phrenic nerve injury following blunt trauma.

    phrenic nerve trauma in the absence of direct injury is unusual and may present diagnostic difficulty. Diaphragmatic paralysis resulting from phrenic nerve injury may closely mimic diaphragmatic rupture. This case highlights the value of magnetic resonance imaging in establishing diaphragmatic integrity and of ultrasonographic assessment during respiratory excursion in confirming diaphragmatic paralysis. In cases of non-contact injury involving torsional injury to the neck, an index of clinical awareness may help to establish the diagnosis of phrenic nerve trauma.
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keywords = neck
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8/54. A fatal accident on the football field.

    A 21-year old centre forward died after a collision with the opposing goalkeeper during a football match. The centre forward fell to the ground on his back and the goalkeeper fell on top of him, his knee hitting the centre forward hard in the chest and neck. There was no obvious foul and the referee did not award a penalty. The ambulance arrived too late to save the player's life. The medicolegal autopsy revealed a severe contusion of the larynx and rupture of thyroid cartilage, which resulted in hemorrhage and caused death by suffocation.
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keywords = neck
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9/54. urinary incontinence after pelvic trauma: a case report.

    Stress and Urge urinary incontinence may develop after a pelvic trauma especially after pelvic bone fractures. Incontinence may persist even though any type of bladder neck suspension is performed if malunion occurs between fracture ends. In stress and urge urinary incontinence developed after pelvic trauma, patients should also be evaluated for malunion of fractures which may lead to bone spurs and during any type of bladder neck suspension these should also be removed.
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ranking = 2
keywords = neck
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10/54. Membranous tracheal rupture in children following minor blunt cervical trauma.

    Injuries to the tracheobronchial tree are well-recognized sequelae of massive blunt or penetrating injuries of the neck or chest. They may also occur as a rare complication of endotracheal intubation. We present 2 cases of a less well-recognized clinical entity, rupture of the membranous trachea following minimal blunt trauma to the neck in children. The case histories and management of this disorder are discussed. Recognition and treatment of this problem requires a high index of suspicion for the lesion and timely investigations. Open repair of the trachea to secure a stable airway is recommended for this injury, unless the wound is small and the wound edges are well approximated.
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ranking = 2
keywords = neck
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