Cases reported "Rupture"

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1/294. Ultrasonic assistance in the diagnosis of hand flexor tendon injuries.

    In contrast to routine flexor tendon injuries, flexor tendon ruptures following blunt injury or re-ruptures following repair can be difficult to diagnose. The authors investigated the efficacy of using ultrasound to assist in the diagnosis. From 1996 to 1997, 8 patients underwent evaluation of the flexor tendons using an ATL HDI-3000 ultrasound machine with a high-resolution, 5 to 9-MHz hockey stick linear probe. Dynamic evaluation was performed in real time, simulating clinical symptoms. Six patients underwent surgical exploration. Sonographic diagnosis and intraoperative findings were correlated. Ultrasound was used to diagnose 3 patients with ruptured flexor digitorum profundus tendons. Mechanisms of injury included forceful extension, penetrating injury, and delayed rupture 3 weeks after tendon repair. Subsequent surgical exploration confirmed the ruptures and location of the stumps. Five patients had intact flexor tendons by ultrasound after forceful extension, penetrating injury, phalangeal fracture, crush injury, and unknown etiology. In 3 patients who underwent surgery for tenolysis, scar release, or arthrodesis, the flexor tendons were found to be intact, as predicted by ultrasound. The authors found ultrasound to be accurate in diagnosing the integrity of flexor tendons and in localizing the ruptured ends. They conclude that ultrasound is helpful in evaluating equivocal flexor tendon injuries.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/294. An unusual cause of haemorrhagic ascites following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Slow intraperitoneal haemorrhage following blunt abdominal trauma may present as haemorrhagic ascites. Such haemorrhage is usually due to rupture of spleen, liver or damage to small bowel mesenteric vasculature. We encountered a patient with bleeding from ruptured exogastric leiomyoblastoma. Two cases of traumatic rupture of gastric leiomyosarcomas have been reported previously. The operative treatment is usually delayed and the diagnosis established only at laparotomy. We suggest a high level of suspicion and early laparotomy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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3/294. Ruptured hemidiaphragm after bilateral lung transplantation.

    A case of right hemidiaphragm rupture and abdominal herniation into the thorax occurring during the immediate post-operative course of double-lung transplantation is reported. This complication has not been reported previously. We examine the possible aetiology and suggest that the direct cause could be an increase in intra-abdominal pressure during chest physiotherapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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4/294. Intraoperative ocular damage caused by a cannula.

    We report a case in which posterior capsule rupture, vitreous loss, and vitreous hemorrhage were caused by a dislodged, flying cannula during phacoemulsification. We modified our surgical practice since the occurrence of this unusual complication and use Luer-lock syringes during surgery. This measure should prevent the recurrence of this complication.
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ranking = 4
keywords = operative
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5/294. Staged operative treatment in a septic patient with an infected, unstable pelvis, and a missed bladder rupture.

    This case demonstrates once again the potential and serious complications of pelvic fractures, especially when associated urogenital injuries are missed. Missing the bladder rupture proved almost fatal to our patient. Second, it was confirmed that in very unstable pelvic fractures, external fixation alone does not provide enough stability. Local stability is the cornerstone in the treatment of (bone) infection, and in these cases, maximal stability is only obtainable with internal fixation. The advantages of metal implants in infected areas outweigh the disadvantages by far. For the bladder-rupture, we chose a two-stage approach. First, we performed a urinary diversion, to avoid surgical closure of the infiltrated bladder wall. All cavities, including the open bladder, were packed with omentum to fill the dead space with highly vital tissue to offer stout resistance to infection. Two years later, with the patient in excellent physical condition, urinary undiversion was carried out. Ultimately physical and social recovery was complete.
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ranking = 4
keywords = operative
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6/294. An unusual complication of retinal reattachment surgery.

    The authors report a case with an unusual late extraocular complication of scleral buckling and local silicone sponge implant. Four years after the reattachment surgery, a ptotic upper eyelid perforated by local silicone sponge implant and fistula between upper eyelid and sclera were detected. Primary repair of upper eyelid and removal of silicone sponge were performed. One year later, the retina was attached and there was no problem with the upper eyelid. cryotherapy, episcleral explant (scleral buckling), and local implant (sponge) are frequently used and effective methods for retinal reattachment surgery. Postoperative early and late complications have been reported. To our knowledge, there is no report of upper eyelid perforation, ptosis and fistula formation caused by silicone sponge implant rejection.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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7/294. Multivascular trauma on an adolescent. Perioperative management.

    Penetrating vascular injury, in particular at the neck, is a life-threatening trauma not only of the nature and the anatomic proximity of cardiovascular, aerodigestive, glandular and neurologic system but also of the development of early and late complications. The following case report describes our experience with a penetrating wound patient, who was admitted to our emergencies twelve hours after the accident. The only demonstrable objective signs included a large hematoma at the right-side of the neck and distended mediastinum on the chest X-ray. As the patient was cardiovascularly unstable he was immediately transported to the theater without any angiography. The mandatory operative exploration was initially unsuccessful and a median sternotomy with a standard cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia circulatory arrest was established to restore all the vascular lesions. Actually, the patient was in critical condition with a rupture of the right internal jugular vein, a large pseudoaneurysm of the innominate artery and an avulsion of the ascending aorta with the suspicion of a cardiac tamponade. The postoperative period lasted two full months, while complications appeared. The substantial message from this multivascular trauma is the early diagnosis of the life-threatening complications as exsanguinations, ventricular fibrillation and the ability to minimize postoperative complications, which will impair the normal functional life of the patient.
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ranking = 7
keywords = operative
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8/294. Massive ovarian haemorrhage complicating oral anticoagulation in the antiphospholipid syndrome: a report of three cases.

    We report three cases of severe haemorrhagic rupture of luteal ovarian cyst requiring surgical haemostasis in young women treated with long-term oral anticoagulation for antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) who used no contraception. At the time of bleeding, the international normalized ratios were 3.78, 4.24, and 7.11. Anticoagulation was resumed post-operatively, in association with antigonadotropic progestins to induce ovulatory suppression. A systematic use of these progestins should probably be discussed in young women receiving long-term warfarin for APS. Ovarian haemorrhage must be considered when such patients develop acute abdominal pain.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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9/294. Diaphragmatic rupture after epidural anaesthesia in a patient with diaphragmatic eventration.

    An 85-year-old man with undiagnosed eventration of the left hemidiaphragm had an above-knee amputation under epidural anaesthesia. His post-operative course was stormy with two episodes of cardiovascular collapse. On the third post-operative day, rupture of the left hemidiaphragm was diagnosed, the bowel had herniated into the left hemithorax. It is proposed that the left hemidiaphragm ruptured spontaneously because of muscular weakness secondary to the thoracic segmental blockade associated with lumber epidural anaesthesia.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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10/294. Traumatic subconjunctival dislocation of the crystalline lens and its surgical management.

    The authors report a case of a 40-year-old female who had sustained a blunt ocular trauma resulting in anterior scleral rupture and subconjunctival dislocation of the crystalline lens. Anterior segment ultrasound aided in the diagnosis. Surgical exploration revealed a 6 mm long anterior scleral rupture which was repaired. Postoperatively the patient had a best corrected visual acuity of 6/18.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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