Cases reported "Rupture"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/79. Checkrein deformity--an unusual complication associated with a closed Salter-Harris Type II ankle fracture: a case report.

    This article presents a case of tethering of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon (checkrein deformity) and rupture of the posterior tibialis tendon after a closed Salter-Harris Type II ankle fracture. Delayed repair was affected by tenolysis of the FHL and flexor digitorum longus tendons and tenodesis of the posterior tibialis to the flexor digitorum longus tendon. This case represents the first such report of concomitant entrapment of the FHL tendon and rupture of the posterior tibialis tendon after a closed ankle fracture.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/79. The cyclops lesion: a cause of diminished knee extension after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Four patients presented with persistent diminution of knee motion after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament with a novel lesion as the cause. Each had participated in an aggressive rehabilitation program for a minimum of 2 months with emphasis on regaining full range of knee motion. Because chronic impairment of knee extension can be disabling, in those who did not regain full range of motion, arthroscopy of the knee ensued. All had a lesion in the intercondylar notch near the tibial insertion of the anterior cruciate ligament that acted as a mechanical obstruction to full knee extension. Grossly and histologically, these were similar to the cyclops lesion that also has been shown to cause loss of knee extension after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Arthroscopic debridement of the cyclops lesion and manual manipulation of the knee under anesthesia lead to restoration of full knee extension in all knees. In 1 other knee with chronic instability after anterior cruciate ligament rupture, the cyclops lesion was present but was very small and was not associated with diminished knee extension. When loss of full extension persists for 2 months after anterior cruciate ligament disruption despite aggressive rehabilitation, the presence of a cyclops lesion should be considered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/79. Soleus rupture: a differential diagnosis of calf thrombosis.

    Soleus rupture may present with clinical features similar to those of calf thrombosis. It is postulated that the signs are the result of compression of the posterior tibial vein as it passes through the narrow space adjacent to the fibrous origin of soleus. A distinctive venographic sign of compression of the posterior tibial vein by a soft tissue mass at the level of the origin of the soleus is described.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/79. The use of magnetic resonance imaging in posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the patient with posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is discussed. Considerations for the proper positioning of the patient and optimal technique to obtain appropriate images of the posterior tibial tendon and associated joint abnormalities are highlighted. Cases are presented to show the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging in different clinical situations. The treatment algorithm for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction should include magnetic resonance imaging as a diagnostic tool when appropriate.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.3333333333333
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/79. Traumatic rupture of the tibialis posterior tendon after ankle fracture: a case report.

    Degenerative tears of the posterior tibial tendon associated with chronic disease are well documented in the literature. Traumatic ruptures of this tendon, however, are much less common and consequently have received little attention. An association has been shown between pronation-external rotation ankle fractures and tears of the tendons that cross the medial aspect of the ankle, most commonly the posterior tibial tendon. In the present case report, we share our unique experience of an open-ankle fracture associated with the traumatic rupture of the posterior tibial tendon. This injury illustrates that soft-tissue injury must always be suspected concomitantly in the treatment of certain fractures on the basis of both mechanism of injury and fracture pattern.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.3333333333333
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/79. rupture of the tibialis anterior tendon.

    Closed rupture of the tendon of tibialis anterior is an infrequently reported entity. A thorough review of the literature was performed with 49 reported cases of this condition identified. Those patients who were treated conservatively experienced late sequelae, including continued slapping of the foot, mild to moderate flatfoot deformity, and ankle arthrosis. Low morbidity associated with surgical reconstruction should preclude only the most sedentary of patients from operative treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.6666666666667
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/79. Anterior cruciate ligament injury in indoor ball games.

    Three videorecorded incidents of knee injuries inflicted during indoor ball games are reported. Injuries and especially anterior cruciate ligament ruptures seemed to be triggered in varus loaded knees by femural external rotation, or in valgus loaded knees by femural internal rotation with the pivot shifted to the lateral femurotibial compartment. The observations suggest that it may be to the players' advantage to be trained in not letting their knees sag medially or laterally during side-stepping or sudden changes in speed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/79. achilles tendon rupture associated with ankle fracture.

    The case of a 40-year-old man who sustained a medial malleolar fracture with extension of the fracture into the tibial plafond is discussed. Before surgery, the physical examination revealed an achilles tendon rupture. Surgical treatment to repair the bone and tendon injury was performed. achilles tendon rupture is not an uncommon injury, but it is rarely associated with a fracture. When a fracture is present, the achilles tendon injury can be overlooked, which may result in a delay of treatment or residual morbidity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/79. An easy and versatile method of coverage for distal tibial soft tissue defects.

    BACKGROUND: The distally based superficial sural artery flap, first described as a distally based neuroskin flap by Masquelet et al., is a skin island flap supplied by the vascular axis of the sural nerve. In the difficult area of defects in the lower leg and the ankle and heel region, it has a wide variety of indications, even in the vascularly compromised patients. It has the largest arc of rotation of all flaps that have been described in this region. The most important advantage is that it does not compromise a major artery. It is simple to dissect and has a low donor morbidity. methods: We reported our experience with this new flap in 15 cases and also described a new indication for the patients with neglected ruptures of the achilles tendon. RESULTS: In 13 patients, the flap was successfully transferred. In two cases, partial necrosis of the flap ensued, which healed with secondary intention. CONCLUSION: This flap deserves a high degree of interest in the reconstructive armamentarium of the trauma surgeon.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/79. 'Fat fracture'--a physical sign mimicking tendon rupture.

    The imaging techniques available to aid the diagnosis of ruptures of tendo Achillis, the rotator cuff and the tendon of tibialis posterior in rheumatoid patients are well described. However, ruptures of tendon or muscle at other sites are uncommon and may be overlooked. diagnosis is often made by localised tenderness, swelling and a lack of active movement associated with a palpable defect. Clinical examination may be inconclusive and can be aided by imaging studies. We report two cases in which ruptures of a tendon were suspected, and ultrasound imaging demonstrated the palpable defect to be a cleavage plane in the subcutaneous fat--a 'fat fracture'.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Rupture'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.