Cases reported "Salivary Duct Calculi"

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1/36. Multiple sialoliths and a sialolith of unusual size in the submandibular duct: a case report.

    A 49-year-old man with multiple sialoliths in the submandibular duct is described. One of the sialoliths was of remarkable size. This report is of interest because of the unusual size and weight of this sialolith and because of the patient's symptoms, which were relatively mild and of short duration.
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ranking = 1
keywords = submandibular
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2/36. Sialolithiasis: the radiolucent ones.

    Radiolucent calculi are discussed. Three cases are presented, with a sialographic interpretation of each. Recent studies show that radiolucent calculi in general and parotid gland sialolithiasis in particular occur more frequently than was previously believed.
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ranking = 0.0020642560652819
keywords = gland
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3/36. The role of computerized tomography in the diagnosis and therapy of parotid stones: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Small, semi-calcified parotid stones are difficult to diagnose as imaging can be extremely difficult. Understanding how to diagnose parotid stones is important to dentists, however, because people with this condition develop parotid swellings and may seek routine dental care. CASE DESCRIPTION: The authors describe a classic case of parotid sialadenitis secondary to a small lucent stone in Stensen's duct. They discovered the stone only because of the keen sensitivity of computerized tomography, or CT, to minimal amounts of calcific salts. The CT scan's ability to accurately locate the stone and its position within 1 centimeter of the orifice facilitated a successful intraoral surgical approach. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: CT can be a significant aid in early diagnosis and therapy of patients with parotid stones, who eventually develop sialadenitis. With early intervention, further gland degeneration and parotidectomy will be prevented.
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ranking = 0.0020642560652819
keywords = gland
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4/36. Submandibular sialolithiasis: a case report.

    Sialolithiasis, salivary gland calculus, is a relatively uncommon condition, which may present as a painful, recurrent swelling of the affected salivary gland or duct. It can also be associated with a bacterial infection, as a result of the physical obstruction of salivary flow. This report describes the treatment of a patient with an unusually large sialolith in the submandibular duct. The patient presented with an apparent dento-alveolar abscess.
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ranking = 0.20412851213056
keywords = submandibular, gland
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5/36. Plunging ranula as a complication of intraoral removal of a submandibular sialolith.

    Mucous cysts in the submandibular region--so-called 'plunging' ranula--are relatively uncommon. We report a case of a plunging ranula that complicated excision of an intraductal sialolith of the submandibular gland.
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ranking = 1.4283151941328
keywords = submandibular gland, submandibular, gland
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6/36. Salivary stone lithotripsy in the hiv patient.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the use of shock-wave lithotripsy in the treatment of salivary gland disease in hiv-positive patients. STUDY DESIGN: Four patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus with ultrasonographically confirmed sialolithiasis (three male patients, mean age 33.5 years, range 19-41 years) were treated with extracorporeal electromagnetic shock-wave lithotripsy. RESULTS: All but one of the patients were successfully treated or experienced relief, with complete stone clearance demonstrated by ultrasonography 12 months after lithotripsy. CONCLUSION: Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy is a safe, effective and minimally invasive technique for the nonsurgical treatment of hiv-positive patients with sialolithiasis.
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ranking = 0.0020642560652819
keywords = gland
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7/36. Combined approach to impacted parotid stones.

    PURPOSE: This article describes the use of combined endoscopic and ultrasound approach to locate and to extract impacted parotid stones, which cannot be retrieved by intraoral approach alone. patients AND methods: A total of 12 parotid glands from 7 women and 5 men (age range, 35 to 62 years) with parotid sialoliths were treated with the combined method. Eleven of 12 of the procedures were performed under local anesthesia in an outpatient clinic. The identification of the calculi was done in 5 patients with 1.3-mm sialoendoscope (Nahlieli Sialoendoscope; Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, germany) in 6 patients with the aid of high-resolution ultrasound, and in 1 patient the location was combined endoscopy and ultrasound. The removal of the calculi was performed extraorally via minimal incision. The indications for the combined approach were 1) calculus in the posterior third of the Stensen's duct with too narrow duct anterior to it, 2) obstruction of the posterior or middle third of the Stensen's ducts leading to the calculus, 3) large (>5-mm) stones in the middle or posterior part of the duct that cannot be dilated for intraductal removal, and 4) intraparenchymal stones. RESULTS: Of the 12 patients, 9 had complete removal (75%); in 1 case with 3 sialoliths, we removed 2 and the gland remained asymptomatic. In 7 cases, the glands returned to function, 3 glands became atrophic with no function, but the gland remained asymptomatic. The aesthetic results were satisfactory in all cases, no major complications were noted. CONCLUSIONS: Combined endoscopic ultrasound approach is another minimal invasive technique for identification and removal of impacted parotid sialolithiasis.
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ranking = 0.01032128032641
keywords = gland
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8/36. Multiple sialolithiasis in the parotid gland with sjogren's syndrome and its sonographic findings--report of 3 cases.

    We present 3 cases of sjogren's syndrome in which multiple sialolithiasis were observed in the parenchyma of the parotid gland. The sonographic examinations showed microliths that were observed as hyperechoic spots. Some of the microliths were accompanied with comet sign, however most of them showed no particular posterior echoes. None of them showed acoustic shadows, which are normally observed in cases with sialolithiasis. We were able to prove that some of the hyperechoic spots observed sonographically in patients with severe sjogren's syndrome were microliths. Although these multiple microliths are rarely detected, they may exist potentially in higher frequency in patients with severe Sjogren's syndrome.
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ranking = 0.01032128032641
keywords = gland
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9/36. Ultrasound-guided basket retrieval of salivary stones: a new technique.

    We describe the successful use of ultrasound-guided retrieval of a submandibular stone with a basket in two patients.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = submandibular
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10/36. Parotid duct sialolithiasis in a patient with down syndrome--case report.

    Sialolithiasis is the phenomenon of blockage of the salivary glands. It frequently is associated with swelling, pain, and infection of the affected gland. Clinically, sialolithiasis manifests as an increase in the size of the affected gland and increased salivary secretion that results in pain during eating. It occurs mainly in the submandibular gland and less frequently in the parotid gland. This article presents a case involving a 23-year-old woman with down syndrome who demonstrated sialolithiasis in the parotid duct gland. The sialolith was radiographed and removed surgically.
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ranking = 0.4386364744592
keywords = submandibular gland, submandibular, gland
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