Cases reported "Salivary Duct Calculi"

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11/36. Parotid sialolithiasis in Stensen's duct.

    Salivary duct lithiasis is a condition characterized by the obstruction of a salivary gland or its excretory duct due to the formation of calcareous concretions or sialoliths resulting in salivary ectasia and even provoking the subsequent dilation of the salivary gland. Sialolithiasis accounts for 30% of salivary diseases and most commonly involves the submaxillary gland (83 to 94%) and less frequently the parotid (4 to 10%) and sublingual glands (1 to 7%). The present study reports the case of a 45-year-old male patient complaining of bad breath and foul-tasting mouth at meal times and presenting with a salivary calculus in left Stensen's duct. Once the patient was diagnosed, the sialolith was surgically removed using local anesthesia. In this paper we have also updated a series of concepts related to the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of sialolithiasis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gland
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12/36. Ultrasound-guided basket retrieval of a submandibular duct stone in a child.

    We describe the successful use of ultrasound-guided retrieval of a submandibular stone with a basket, in a 13-year-old child.
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ranking = 121.10900590516
keywords = submandibular
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13/36. Extraoral parotid sialolithotomy.

    The extraoral approach to duct surgery for the removal of parotid stones can be a simple procedure once the stone is accurately located in relation to the skin surface. The combination of sialography and sonography can provide this information. A case report demonstrates the step-by-step approach to diagnosis, localization, and surgery for the management of such extraglandular sialoliths.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = gland
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14/36. Diagnosing salivary stones.

    Sialolithiasis, or the formation of sialoliths or salivary stones, typically occurs in the ducts of the submandibular and parotid glands of middle-aged adults. pain and swelling are often among the first signs and symptoms. Obstructive sialadentitis, epidemic parotitis (mumps) and salivary gland tumors, should all be included in the differential diagnosis for sialolithiasis.
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ranking = 24.721801181033
keywords = submandibular, gland
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15/36. Giant submandibular calculus. A case report.

    A case of giant mandibular calculus, 6.5 X 5.5 cm, is presented. The management of this condition is reviewed and an explanation offered for the occurrence of these calculi.
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ranking = 96.887204724131
keywords = submandibular
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16/36. A giant submandibular sialolith: management and complications.

    A case of a 55-year-old man with an unusually large asymptomatic stone (3.5 x 2.0 x 2.0 cm) lying in the Wharton's duct is presented.
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ranking = 96.887204724131
keywords = submandibular
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17/36. Giant salivary calculi: an orocervical fistula caused by a submandibular gland calculus.

    Large calculi of the salivary glands are rare. They may go undetected for many years. The authors report three cases of giant submandibular gland calculi. In one patient, the calculus was an incidental finding. In all patients, the mass was in the substance of the gland; in one, the configuration of the mass was unusual and it had eroded through the floor of the buccal cavity forming an orocervical fistula (the first such report) and in another the mass occupied a small portion of Wharton's duct. The histopathologic findings in all three cases were of nonspecific chronic inflammation. All the patients made a smooth recovery and had no complaints at follow-up.
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ranking = 259.8641368775
keywords = submandibular gland, submandibular, gland
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18/36. Recurrent calculus formation following removal of the submandibular salivary gland.

    Three cases are presented in which calculi appear to have reformed in the submandibular duct many years after the total removal of the submandibular gland. The basis for this is presumed to be the existence of communications between the sublingual glandular complex and the remaining submandibular duct.
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ranking = 198.4536344617
keywords = submandibular gland, submandibular, gland
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19/36. Absolute indications for salivary gland scintigraphy with 99mTc-pertechnetate.

    In recent years salivary gland scintigraphy has gained widespread acceptance as a useful means for evaluating salivary gland disorders. An absolute indication for this procedure exists when the ductal orifice of one or several major salivary glands cannot be found or cannot be cannulated. Clinical conditions in which this problem occurs include technical failure to probe and cannulate the duct, developmental anomalies, obstructive disorders, traumatic lesions and fistulae and the need of postsurgical information after glandular excision or after ligation or repositioning of a major excretory duct. The clinical value of scintigraphy in these conditions is demonstrated by means of case presentations.
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ranking = 2
keywords = gland
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20/36. Large calculi of the submandibular salivary glands.

    salivary calculi occur in the submandibular and parotid glands, and their ducts, and occasionally reach a large size. However, little information is available on the composition of these giant stones. 2 cases are reported of unusually large calculi of the submandibular salivary glands. The glands were excised, and the results of chemical and infrared analysis of the calculi are presented.
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ranking = 147.0808070862
keywords = submandibular, gland
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