Cases reported "Sarcoma, Kaposi"

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11/24. Epithelioid angiomatosis in patients with AIDS. Report of seven cases and review of the literature.

    Seven cases of a distinctive vascular proliferation in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are discussed and compared with other reported cases. All cases share clinical and pathologic manifestations that can be recognized early. Warthin-Starry-positive bacilli within some of the lesions and their response to erythromycin may indicate that the proliferation is associated with an infectious agent, possibly the bacillus that causes cat-scratch disease.
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ranking = 1
keywords = angiomatosis
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12/24. Extensive hemangiomatosis of the extremities with the same histopathological pattern as the early lesion of Kaposi's sarcoma.

    For 13 years a 28-year-old man had on his hands and feet bluish red patches, which had slowly progressed in size. biopsy specimens exhibited an abnormal vascular pattern similar to that seen in early lesions of Kaposi's sarcoma. Skeletal radiographs of the hands and feet showed lesions indicating hemangiomatosis.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = angiomatosis
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13/24. infection-associated vascular lesions in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients.

    Several reports have recently appeared in the literature describing "unique" non-neoplastic vascular lesions in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These lesions may be mistaken clinically and histologically for Kaposi's sarcoma. The terms epithelioid angiomatosis, epithelioid or histiocytoid hemangioma, and pyogenic granuloma have all been used to describe a similar entity in which cat scratch disease bacillus (CSDB) was subsequently identified. Lesions closely resembling this entity occur in patients with bartonellosis. We report a case of a cutaneous vascular lesion on the hand of an AIDS patient in which cytomegalovirus (CMV) and organisms consistent with CSDB were both found. Simultaneous infections with CMV and CSDB have not been previously described. The presence of these organisms in and around endothelial cells may provide the common stimulus for the formation of these reactive vascular proliferations.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = angiomatosis
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14/24. Bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis and concurrent Kaposi's sarcoma in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Two patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome developed simultaneous Kaposi's sarcoma and bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis. The distinguishing clinical and histologic features of these two vascular proliferations associated with human immunodeficiency virus disease are described. The lesions of bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis contained bacteria, while the lesions of Kaposi's sarcoma did not. With erythromycin therapy, the lesions of bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis cleared, while those of Kaposi's persisted. Bacillary (epithelioid) angiomatosis, a treatable but potentially fatal opportunistic infection of human immunodeficiency virus disease, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vascular lesions in immunosuppressed patients.
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ranking = 2
keywords = angiomatosis
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15/24. Lytic vertebral lesions: an unusual manifestation of AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma.

    The differential diagnosis of neovascular skin lesions in patients with AIDS includes Kaposi's sarcoma and bacillary angiomatosis. It has been suggested that the radiographic presence of lytic bone lesions in association with these skin lesions supports a diagnosis of bacillary angiomatosis. We present a case of disseminated Kaposi's sarcoma in which evidence of lytic vertebral disease was seen on computed tomography; the histopathologic characteristics of the osseous lesions are described. Findings of magnetic resonance imaging implied more diffuse marrow involvement. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated osseous manifestations of rochalimaea infection and Kaposi's sarcoma are reviewed.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = angiomatosis
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16/24. Oral mucosal bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis in a patient with AIDS associated with rapid alveolar bone loss: case report.

    oral manifestations of bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis have been described in the literature, but without histopathologic evidence confirming the presence of the etiologic bacilli. The clinical and histopathologic similarities between bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis and Kaposi's sarcoma may have contributed to confusion in diagnosis and treatment of the latter. Furthermore, inclusion of bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis in the differential diagnosis of proliferative vascular lesions may help to clarify the etiology, pathology and epidemiology of these lesions. This article is the first report of the intraoral manifestation of bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis with histopathologic documentation of the causative pathogen.
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ranking = 2
keywords = angiomatosis
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17/24. Eruptive epithelioid hemangioendothelioma with spindle cells.

    A 39-year-old white man presented with four discrete dermal nodules in his right upper arm. biopsy revealed superficial dermal well-circumscribed nodules composed of solid areas and vascular spaces lined by epithelioid endothelial cells and a similar nodule composed of spindle and epithelioid cells. A moderate mitotic count of 3-4 mitoses/10 hpf was present. Multiple lesions erupted 1 month later distally and proximally to the original lesions. magnetic resonance imaging of the right arm demonstrated a lesion in the humerus. biopsy of the humerus showed a vascular tumor with similar histologic features to the overlying skin lesions. The differential diagnosis included epithelioid vascular tumors, bacillary angiomatosis, pyogenic granuloma, and Kaposi sarcoma. Vascular lesions containing epithelioid and spindle cells span a spectrum from benign to malignant. We believe these tumors belong in the category of hemangioendothelioma and propose the name eruptive epithelioid hemangioendothelioma with spindle cells. Our case emphasizes that eruptive cutaneous vascular lesions do not always suggest immunosuppression or malignancy. Additionally, it highlights the association between epithelioid vascular lesions of the skin and bone.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = angiomatosis
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18/24. Kaposi's sarcoma versus bacillary angiomatosis.

    persons with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are subject to a host of pathologic entities secondary to a depressed immune system. Kaposi's sarcoma frequently presents in this immunocompromised population and, therefore, diagnosis seems clinically straightforward. However, because of the prevalence of a strikingly similar infectious disease known as bacillary angiomatosis, skin biopsy of one or more lesions is crucial.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = angiomatosis
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19/24. Bacillary angiomatosis: presentation of six patients, some with unusual features.

    Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) is an unusual systemic vascular proliferation seen predominantly in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. These vascular lesions are probably due to infection with a Bartonella species, most often B. henselae and, in some patients, B. quintana. BA is treatable and often curable, but without therapy, may be life-threatening. Clinically, the lesions, when superficial, are said to often resemble pyogenic granulomas, appearing polypoid histologically with an epidermal collarette. We now report six patients, three of whom showed lesions of BA morphologically and histologically distinct from the other patients reported to date. Two patients lesions appeared clinically as violaceous plaques and tumours resembling Kaposi's sarcoma; one of them had lesions histologically reminiscent of a papular angiokeratoma; and the other had lesions histologically suggestive of a combination of Kaposi's sarcoma and BA. Another patient presented with soft subcutaneous nodules which histologically showed extensive acute inflammation characteristic of an acute abscess, but which also displayed proliferating dilated small blood vessels with bulbous endothelial cells adjacent to numerous bacteria and also containing them. The Grocott-methenamine silver stain and the Warthin-Starry stain showed the organisms to better advantage in lesions of all six patients, although bacteria were also evident with the haematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff and alcian blue stains.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = angiomatosis
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20/24. Molecular diagnosis of deep nodular bacillary angiomatosis and monitoring of therapeutic success.

    A 51-year-old human immunodeficiency virus (hiv)-positive male patient (CDC stage 3C) had had a painful nodule on his external ankle joint for 10 months. A biopsy suggested bacillary angiomatosis, but Kaposi's sarcoma could not be excluded. Rods were detectable in lesional skin by a Warthin-Starry stain. A 298 base pair (bp) gene fragment specific for Bartonella species was amplified from lesional skin and direct nucleotide sequence analysis of the amplification product clearly identified bartonella quintana. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus specific dna was not amplifiable by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in our patient, suggesting that the lesion represented bacillary angiomatosis alone, despite clinical and histopathological features which suggested the coexistence of bacillary angiomatosis and Kaposi's sarcoma. The lesion regressed after erythromycin was prescribed. However, 4 and 9 weeks after initiation of therapy, PCR still yielded a positive result in material obtained by a swab. After complete healing, following 12 weeks of antibiotic therapy, PCR became consistently negative. The optimal length of antibiotic treatment in hiv-positive patients with bacillary angiomatosis is not yet known and inadequate therapy may be followed by disseminated disease and a fatal outcome. PCR-based monitoring of the success of treatment is valuable for determining the duration of treatment resulting in a cure.
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ranking = 2
keywords = angiomatosis
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