Cases reported "Scalp Dermatoses"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/20. Necrotizing fasciitis of the scalp in a neonate.

    We report an 11-day-old baby who presented with necrotizing fasciitis of the scalp from which escherichia coli was cultured. Treatment consisted of administration of parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics and debridement. skin grafting of the resulting scalp defect was not permitted by the parents. The wound healed with scar tissue over 3 months.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/20. Infected cephalohematoma associated with sepsis and scalp cellulitis: a case report.

    Infected cephalohematoma is rarely complicated by sepsis. We report a case of an infected cephalohematoma caused by escherichia coli sepsis in an otherwise healthy neonate. skull X-ray revealed soft tissue swelling over parieto-temporal region but no osteolytic lesion. 99mTc bone scan showed scalp cellulitis. blood culture and scalp wound culture identified E. coli. Treatment with surgical incision and drainage and administration of antibiotics resulted in prompt improvement. The relationship of scalp cellulitis, infected cephalohematoma, and sepsis are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/20. A case of kerion celsi due to Arthroderma benhamiae identified by dna sequences of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 regions.

    We describe a case of a 4-year-old boy with a 1-month history of a purulent lesion on his scalp. His hair samples revealed fungal organisms and trichophyton mentagrophytes was cultured from the sample. We analysed the dna sequences of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region of the isolated fungus. These sequences were in accordance with T. mentagrophytes animal 4 type. In mating experiments, our strain only responded to the Arthroderma benhamiae Americano-European race ( ) mating type tester. We speculate that the patient was infected from contact with his pet guinea pig. This is the first case of a clinical isolate of A. benhamiae being identified by dna sequences of nuclear ribosomal ITS1 regions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/20. Surrogate nits impregnated with white piedra--a case report.

    White piedral spores packed inside empty pedicular nits were accidentally found on microscopic examination in a 42-year-old Indian woman who presented with hair loss. The diagnosis of piedra was confirmed on culture. She responded to topical 2% miconazole nitrate solution and manual removal of the nits. This is the first case report of pedicular nits found to be impregnated with spores of white piedra.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/20. Tufted hair folliculitis: complete enduring response after treatment with rifampicin.

    BACKGROUND: A 47-year-old woman presented with erythematous lesions with papules and pustules on her parieto-occipital region that had been present for 8 months. Areas of sclero-atrophic alopecia were evident, whereas at different points tufted hair shafts were coming out from single dilatated follicular ostia. Before our observation, an antibiotic oral therapy with tetracyclines and local with erythromycin had been administered to the patient, with partial improvement and relapse on its suspension. methods: Bacterial culture from pustules showed the development of staphylococcus aureus. A skin biopsy was done. According to clinical and histopathological findings a diagnosis of tufted hair folliculitis was made and a treatment with oral rifampicin was started at the dosage of 450 mg twice per day. RESULTS: After 3 weeks of therapy, the pustular lesions regressed completely and after a follow-up of 1 year no relapse was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Rifampicin is one of the best active antibiotics against S. aureus, which seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of tufted hair folliculitis. Our results, if further confirmed, may suggest a role for rifampicin either for the control of the pustular phase of this rare disorder or to prevent its relapses for a long time.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/20. Recalcitrant scalp folliculitis: a possible role of herpes simplex virus type 2.

    We report the case of a 70-year-old man with a 1 year history of relapsing folliculitis of the scalp. Bacteriological, mycological and the Tzanck tests from the lesions were negative. Histopathological study showed suppurative perifollicular flogosis. Virological cultures were negative, while HSV nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) assays made on swabs and histological sections from the scalp lesions demonstrated the presence of herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) in all samples. skin swabs of healthy areas yielded negative results for HSV-2 infection. The folliculitis showed a marked and quick improvement after therapy with famciclovir suggesting a possible etiologic role of HSV-2 in the scalp folliculitis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/20. Necrotizing fasciitis of the scalp in a newborn.

    BACKGROUND: Fetal scalp electrode monitoring is usually without complications, but on rare occasions it can serve as a portal of entry for organisms colonizing the maternal genital tract. CASE: We present a case of neonatal necrotizing fasciitis of the scalp that was associated with intrapartum fetal scalp electrode monitoring. skin cultures grew Group A streptococcus M11 T nontypeable serotype, an unusual cause of neonatal necrotizing fasciitis. The neonate's mother had a concurrent perineal infection and the same Group A streptococcal serotype was cultured from maternal blood and vaginal swabs. CONCLUSION: This case highlights the emergence of life-threatening Group A streptococcus causing invasive disease in both infants and mothers and the need for careful monitoring of neonates who have had intrapartum electrode monitoring.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/20. Fontana-positive grains in mycetoma caused by microsporum canis.

    We describe mycetoma caused by microsporum canis occurring in a 9-year-old African-American girl. Pathologic evaluation showed a granulomatous dermatitis with numerous large fungal grains containing septate hyphae that were Fontana-Masson positive. Two cultures of pure grains grew M. canis. mycetoma due to dermatophytes is very uncommon. The few instances reported have been pseudomycetoma (grains in the absence of sinus tracts). Our patient developed sinus tracts (true mycetoma). No prior reports were found of M. canis staining Fontana positive. Differentiation of dermatophyte-induced mycetoma from kerion is important because mycetomas require a combined approach including surgical debridement in addition to oral antifungal therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/20. infection of fetal scalp electrode monitoring sites.

    Complications caused by placement of a fetal scalp electrode include trauma, hemorrhage and infection. Infections are usually localized and self-limited, but they can occasionally lead to serious complications, such as osteomyelitis, sepsis and death. The recommended treatment for a scalp abscess is incision and drainage, followed by appropriate antibiotic therapy. If a serious infection is suspected, the infant should be hospitalized, blood cultures obtained and intravenous antibiotic therapy initiated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/20. Generalized pustulation as a manifestation of the anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome.

    BACKGROUND.-The anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome is characterized by the development of fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, and hepatitis, and is associated with leukocytosis and eosinophilia. This article describes the unusual development of a follicular pustular eruption in two patients as a manifestation of this syndrome. OBSERVATIONS.-This pustular eruption most commonly develops on the face and scalp but may subsequently become generalized. While cultures of the pustules are negative, biopsy specimens reveal a dilated follicular infundibulum filled with neutrophils. Recognition of cutaneous pustulation as a potential manifestation of this syndrome is important, as a generalized pustular eruption developing in a febrile patient can easily be confused with an infectious process. CONCLUSIONS.-The anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome may present with a follicular pustular eruption rather than the more commonly associated macular or papular rash or erythroderma. The three most commonly used anticonvulsants, phenytoin, phenobarbital, and carbamazepine, can each produce an identical hypersensitivity reaction. In addition, in vitro testing has demonstrated that approximately 80% of patients tested to all three medications had positive reactions to each. Furthermore, with in vitro testing researchers are able to predict which anticonvulsants are safe to use, thereby allowing for prospective individualization of therapy. However, this technology is not yet available for widespread use.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Scalp Dermatoses'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.