Cases reported "Sciatic Neuropathy"

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1/13. sciatic neuropathy secondary to total hip arthroplasty wear debris.

    sciatic neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty can result from several causes. We present a case in which a large cystic mass developed around a failed total hip arthroplasty. The lesion extended through the greater sciatic notch and into the pelvis producing sciatic nerve compression. The diagnosis was delayed, and the patient underwent a laminectomy without relief of symptoms before an abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan revealed the mass. After revision of the components and excision of the accessible portion of the lesion, the symptoms improved. Resolution of the intrapelvic portion of the mass was demonstrated on follow-up CT scan, suggesting that retroperitoneal resection of this type of lesion may not be required at the time of revision of the components.
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2/13. Idiopathic sciatic mononeuropathy.

    sciatic nerve lesions are usually painful and secondary to compression, trauma, infarction or part of a systemic illness. The etiology is usually defined by radiographic or blood studies, or by exploratory surgery. In rare cases, as the one being presented, there is clear clinical and electrophysiological evidence for a lesion of the sciatic nerve, but no morphological correlate or defined etiology. These idiopathic sciatic mononeuropathies seem to occur in the nerves of the legs in young adults.
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3/13. Peripheral nerve injury after brief lithotomy for transurethral collagen injection.

    Two patients with prior prostate surgery sustained peripheral nerve injuries after transurethral collagen injection for the treatment of urinary incontinence. In the first patient, brief lithotomy positioning caused a gluteal compartment syndrome and sciatic neuropathy. In the second patient, obturator neuropathy was due to leakage of collagen along the course of the obturator nerve. This is the first report of peripheral nerve injury in patients undergoing transurethral collagen injection.
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4/13. sciatic nerve compression following bone marrow harvest.

    We describe a donor who suffered pain secondary to sacral plexus and sciatic nerve compression post bone marrow harvest. Haematoma was demonstrated by magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanning. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of compression neuropathy post bone marrow harvest documented by MRI scanning. Given the increasing number of bone marrow transplants being performed and the paramount importance of donor safety, compressive neuropathies need to be remembered as rare but debilitating complications of bone marrow harvesting. MRI scanning is a useful modality to investigate severe or neuropathic pain post bone marrow harvest.
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5/13. The value of MR neurography for evaluating extraspinal neuropathic leg pain: a pictorial essay.

    SUMMARY: Fifteen patients with neuropathic leg pain referable to the lumbosacral plexus or sciatic nerve underwent high-resolution MR neurography. Thirteen of the patients also underwent routine MR imaging of the lumbar segments of the spinal cord before undergoing MR neurography. Using phased-array surface coils, we performed MR neurography with T1-weighted spin-echo and fat-saturated T2-weighted fast spin-echo or fast spin-echo inversion recovery sequences, which included coronal, oblique sagittal, and/or axial views. The lumbosacral plexus and/or sciatic nerve were identified using anatomic location, fascicular morphology, and signal intensity as discriminatory criteria. None of the routine MR imaging studies of the lumbar segments of the spinal cord established the cause of the reported symptoms. Conversely, MR neurography showed a causal abnormality accounting for the clinical findings in all 15 cases. Detected anatomic abnormalities included fibrous entrapment, muscular entrapment, vascular compression, posttraumatic injury, ischemic neuropathy, neoplastic infiltration, granulomatous infiltration, neural sheath tumor, postradiation scar tissue, and hypertrophic neuropathy.
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6/13. Intraoperative positioning during cesarean as a cause of sciatic neuropathy.

    BACKGROUND: sciatic nerve compression has been well documented as a cause of perioperative sciatic neuropathy but rarely during cesarean. CASE: A parturient complained of left foot drop after cesarean delivery for twins performed under spinal anesthesia. Intraoperatively, her right hip was raised with padding under the right buttock to tilt the pelvis approximately 30 degrees to the left. Postoperatively, the patient had weakness, sensory changes, and diminished reflexes in the left lower extremity. Electrodiagnostic studies supported a diagnosis of neurapraxia and partial denervation in the distribution of the sciatic nerve. By postpartum week 6, she had full recovery. CONCLUSION: Elevating the right buttock during cesarean can cause compression of the underlying structures of the left buttock and result in sciatic neuropathy. Decreasing the duration of time the patient is in the left lateral position may reduce the risk of this uncommon but debilitating complication.
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7/13. Complete sciatic nerve palsy after open femur fracture: successful treatment with neurolysis 6 months after injury.

    Although relatively uncommon, peripheral nerve can be injured secondary to fracture or dislocation. As therapeutic strategies may vary with the status of the nerve involved, accurate diagnosis is critical. The case described in this report involves a complete sciatic nerve palsy occurring after an open femur fracture treated 6 months earlier. The palsy was erroneously attributed to ischemic neuropathy from compartment syndrome, but late surgical exploration showed that the sciatic nerve was in continuity but enveloped by scar. Neurolysis resulted in full motor and sensory recovery below the knee. Accurate interpretation of physical findings and neurophysiologic tests in the management of fractures associated with nerve injury is emphasized.
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8/13. Antiphospholipid antibodies and ischemic neuropathy following cardiac surgery.

    sciatic nerve palsy is an uncommon complication of cardiac surgery and is thought to be induced by a combination of reduced femoral artery blood flow, small vessel vascular disease or prolonged hypoxia. We here describe a new case which is the first described with transient elevation of antiphospholipid antibodies. Although transient elevation of lupus coagulation inhibitor is known to occur frequently in patients treated in an intensive care unit, there are very few data about the possible role of antiphospholipid antibodies in the generation of ischemic neuropathies. We can not prove that the ischemic neuropathy in our case has been favored by the presence of lupus coagulation inhibitor and antiphospholipid antibodies as the occurrence of the symptoms seemed to precede the transient elevation of lupus coagulation inhibitor. This case suggests that antiphospholipid antibodies and lupus coagulation inhibitor should be included in the work up of patients who present nerve damage after cardiac surgery but further studies are needed to ascertain this association.
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9/13. Sciatic neurostenalgia: caused by total hip arthroplasty, cured by late neurolysis.

    We describe a patient with a painful sciatic neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty. Treatment was confined to neuroleptic and analgesic agents until neurolysis at seven years abolished pain and restored function.
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10/13. Traumatic venous varix causing sciatic neuropathy: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: sciatic neuropathy rarely presents in nonpenetrating trauma because of protection of the nerve by the pelvis, the gluteal muscles, and the tissues in the posterior thigh. We present the case of a patient who fell and subsequently developed a traumatic venous varix of the inferior gluteal vein that caused compression sciatic neuropathy. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: Seven days after a fall onto her right buttock, the patient developed a painful burning paresthesia in her leg and numbness on the dorsum of her foot. Numerous studies ruled out lumbar spine pathological abnormalities as the cause of the pain. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion adjacent to the sciatic nerve. Gradient echo and two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance imaging sequences confirmed this to be a vascular lesion originating from the inferior gluteal vein and compressing the sciatic nerve. INTERVENTION: Operative resection obliterated the venous varix, thereby relieving the patient's pain and neurological deficit. CONCLUSION: No case of a traumatic venous varix of the inferior gluteal vein compressing the sciatic nerve has been reported to date. Surgical resection was successful in obliterating the lesion and relieving the symptoms.
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