Cases reported "Scleritis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/15. Aureobasidium pullulans scleritis following keratoplasty: a case report.

    Fungal scleritis is a rare entity. A 50-year-old patient with culture proven Aureobasidium pullulans corneal ulcer underwent therapeutic keratoplasty. He developed scleritis 5 days following surgery. Although the patient had symptomatic improvement after antifungal therapy, surgical debridement, and cryotherapy, visual improvement was only marginal. Aureobasidium pullulans should be looked for as a cause for keratomycosis and scleromycosis, especially in tropical countries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/15. Surgically induced necrotizing scleritis after pterygium excision and conjunctival autograft.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of surgically induced necrotizing scleritis (SINS) after pterygium excision and conjunctival autograft. methods: A 55-year-old man presented 2 weeks after excision of primary pterygium with conjunctival autograft in the right eye with severe pain in that eye. He had undergone cataract surgery in that eye 8 months before. The graft was pale and white. The underlying sclera was white and avascular. There was marked inflammation adjacent to the site of surgery and graft. A scraping from the graft surface revealed no organisms in smears, and culture revealed no growth. The conjunctival graft was removed. Amniotic membrane transplantation was performed. After surgery, the amniotic membrane was avascular and pale. Systemic steroid therapy was initiated. RESULTS: Three days after initiation of systemic steroid therapy, the graft became vascularized. Over the next 10 days, the eye quietened, conjunctival and scleral inflammation lessened, and the graft was well accepted. CONCLUSIONS: Surgically induced necrotizing scleritis is a rare complication of pterygium excision with conjunctival autograft. A pale graft with underlying avascular sclera and surrounding inflammation should arouse suspicion of this complication.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/15. nocardia asteroides sclerokeratitis in a contact lens wearer.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of sclerokeratitis caused by nocardia asteroides in a soft contact lens wearer. CASE REPORT: A 65-year-old male presented with a 2-month history of a corneal ulcer in the left eye. He wore two weekly disposable soft contact lenses on an extended basis. He revealed his history of gardening before the onset of symptoms. On examination, his best-corrected visual acuity was 20/30 in the right eye and 20/400 in the left eye. In the left eye, there was conjunctival injection. His cornea showed multiple patchy infiltrates, with a feathery border that was raised and involved up to the midstroma. There was a 3 anterior chamber reaction. Corneal scrapings were performed for smears and cultures. Topical 2% amikacin sulfate every half hour along with oral clarithromycin therapy was initiated. On follow-up, the sclera lesions worsened. RESULTS: Smears of corneal scrapings revealed gram-positive filamentous bacteria in Gram's stain. The cultures grew nocardia asteroides. The patient was switched to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim DS, Roche laboratories, Nutley, NJ) as the sclera was involved. The patient responded to treatment, and the infection resolved. When last seen, approximately 4 months after his initial presentation to us, his visual acuity was 20/40 in the affected eye. There was corneal scarring, and the adjacent sclera showed thinning. CONCLUSIONS: Nocardia sclerokeratitis can be associated with contact lens wear. Nocardia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a corneal ulcer with an indolent progressive course with feathery infiltrates. Topical amikacin and systemic trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are effective drugs in the treatment of nocardial corneal infection with scleral involvement.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/15. Fungal scleritis after cataract surgery. Successful outcome using itraconazole.

    We report the development of fungal scleritis in a 53-year-old man after uncomplicated cataract surgery. Histopathology and culture identified the organism as aspergillus flavus. Clinically, the patient worsened on treatment with oral ketoconazole and topical amphotericin b with progression of multifocal scleral nodules and necrosis. Resolution of inflammation was achieved using oral itraconazole, a new triazole antifungal agent. The patient achieved 20/15-2 visual acuity and remains free of symptoms and signs for greater than 2 years after discontinuation of all treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/15. A case of infected scleral buckle with mycobacterium chelonae associated with chronic intraocular inflammation.

    PURPOSE: To describe a unique case of chronic intraocular inflammation secondary to scleral buckle infection with mycobacterium chelonae that was successfully treated with buckle explantation. methods: Case report. RESULTS: A 59-year-old male with a history of retinal detachment repair at the age of 41 presented with chronic, recurrent intraocular inflammation responsive to topical corticosteroids. Conjunctival erosion with exposure of the scleral buckle occurred five months after initial presentation. The scleral buckle was removed and cultured. After three weeks of postoperative topical tobramycin and dexamethasone treatment, the patient has remained symptom-free without medications. The explanted material grew acid-fast bacilli later identified as M. chelonae. CONCLUSIONS: This case describes a new finding of chronic intraocular inflammation associated with a scleral buckle infected with M. chelonae and the successful resolution of extraocular infection and intraocular inflammation after buckle removal.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/15. Clinicopathologic case report: scleral buckle associated nontuberculous mycobacterial scleritis.

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections have become increasingly important in ophthalmology, particularly with keratorefractive surgery. We report a case of scleral buckle associated NTM scleritis occurring in a 69-year-old male after silicone sponge explant removal. Purulent scleral ulceration with nodule formation persisted despite topical antimicrobial therapy, buckle removal, and surgical debridement. Eventually, tissue biopsy revealed noncasseating granulomas with acid-fast bacilli that were identified in culture as mycobacterium chelonae. The infection resolved only after administration of systemic antibiotics. NTM are important pathogens in scleral buckle associated scleritis and should be considered in persistent cases. Surgical therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy, but antimicrobials, particularly newer fourth generation fluoroqunilones, may have an important role in treating scleral buckle associated NTM scleritis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/15. stenotrophomonas maltophilia keratitis and scleritis.

    BACKGROUND: stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a seldom-reported pathogen in ocular infections. The report describes six cases of stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) keratitis and scleritis. To our knowledge, this is the foremost report of S. maltophilia scleritis. methods: Laboratory reports of patients diagnosed with S. maltophilia ocular infections were collected from the ophthalmic department of Chang-Gung memorial hospital from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2003. On evaluation of risk factors, isolates, antibiotic sensitivities, and response to the treatment ensued. RESULTS: Of the 6 reported cases, 5 related bacterial keratitis and 2 scleritis. (One case reported S. maltophilia keratitis and secondary scleritis.) The primary risk factor in such cases is ocular surgery. The organism cultured was the single isolate in three cases (50%). The susceptibility test showed that 50%, 83%, and 100% of the isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime, a combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, and ciprofloxacin respectively. DISCUSSION: Ocular surface compromise such as penetrating keratoplasty was a primary risk factor of S. maltophilia keratitis in our study. The results of isolates and the antibiotic sensitivities were different from previously published results. Our cases responded well to antibiotic therapy and antibiotic therapy combined with conjunctival autografting. One case of S. maltophilia keratitis and secondary scleritis had a poor prognosis, arguably associated with a co-infection of Mycobacteria chelonae.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/15. Six cases of scleritis associated with systemic infection.

    Isolated scleritis (without keratitis) associated with infections is uncommon, and correct diagnosis and appropriate therapy for it are often delayed. Six patients with infection-associated scleritis were seen at our institution between May 1983 and May 1990 (these patients represented 4.6% of all patients with scleritis [six of 130 patients] in that period). Three of these cases were associated with systemic infections. One was associated with syphilis, one was associated with tuberculosis, and one was associated with toxocariasis. Three cases resulted from local infections. One was associated with infection with proteus mirabilis, one was associated with infection with herpes zoster virus, and one was associated with infection with Aspergillus. The Aspergillus infection developed after trauma and the P. mirabilis-induced infection developed after strabismus surgical procedures. Four of the six cases were initially misdiagnosed and inappropriately managed. Correct diagnosis was made seven days to four years after onset of symptoms. review of systems, scleral biopsy, culture, and laboratory investigation were used to make the diagnosis. Differential diagnosis of scleritis must include infective agents.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/15. scleritis and streptococcus pneumoniae.

    We retrospectively review our experience with four patients with streptococcus pneumoniae scleritis. Two of the patients had been exposed to beta irradiation after pterygium removal 4 and 13 years previously. One patient had a 3-year history of chronic anterior nodular scleritis, and one patient had severe rheumatoid arthritis. All were treated with intensive i.v. and topical fortified antibiotics. In two of the cases, the infection was controlled and visual acuity returned to 20/30 and 20/60. In one patient, infectious scleritis progressed to endophthalmitis. This eye ultimately became phthisical and required enucleation because of chronic pain. In the remaining patient, infectious scleritis led to perforation, which required a corneal-scleral patch graft. This patient had a final visual acuity of counting fingers. An infectious etiology should be suspected in cases of necrotizing scleritis associated with a purulent discharge, and appropriate smears and cultures should be obtained. Infectious scleritis can be caused by streptococcal organisms. Appropriate topical and intravenous antibiotic treatment is effective in some cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/15. scedosporium prolificans sclerokeratitis.

    BACKGROUND: The fungus scedosporium prolificans was first described as a human pathogen in 1984, and has been associated with metastatic endophthalmitis and one previously reported case of sclerokeratitis. methods: We report a case of S. prolificans sclerokeratitis in the setting of late scleral necrosis complicating pterygium surgery with adjunctive beta-irradiation. RESULTS: A poor clinical response to topical natamycin and amphotericin b, and systemic itraconazole and ketoconazole was encountered. Enucleation was required, with subsequent microbiological cure. Pathological correlation is described. CONCLUSIONS: S. prolificans infections often respond poorly to medical therapy. Early surgical intervention is indicated in culture-proven scleritis due to scedosporium prolificans.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Scleritis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.