Cases reported "Scleroderma, Localized"

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1/16. radiation-induced localized scleroderma in breast cancer patients.

    radiation-induced scleroderma in breast cancer patients appears to occur in approximately one out of every 500 patients. We report four cases that developed within 3 months of conservative breast surgery and postoperative radiation treatment. The reaction was contained entirely within the treatment field and demonstrated the typical features of this condition where the breast becomes erythematous, violaceous, indurated, retracted, and progressively pigmented. The breast tends to soften and become more comfortable over 1-4 years; however, significant induration, retraction and pigmentary changes remain. There appears to be no predictive factors. radiation-induced scleroderma must be differentiated from cellulitis and recurrent breast cancer.
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2/16. Postirradiation morphea of the breast presentation of two cases and review of the literature.

    The advent of radiation therapy as a common modality in the treatment and palliation of breast cancer has led to the observation of morphea developing months to years after supervoltage radiation therapy, in and around the site of treatment. We report 2 new cases of morphea at the site of previous supervoltage radiation therapy for breast cancer. The time period between irradiation and onset of morphea in our 2 patients were an atypically long 6.5 years and 32 years, the latter being the longest reported such interval. With conservative treatment, the inflammatory component of the lesions resolved over an approximately 1-year period, leaving residual sclerosis. These patients are compared to those previously reported in the medical literature so as to summarize the range of clinical presentation and course. Recognition of postirradiation morphea is important in distinguishing it from infectious cellulitis, recurrent carcinoma, metastatic carcinoma or development of a second primary carcinoma. copyright (R) 2000 S.Karger AG, Basel
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3/16. Scleroderma in association with the use of docetaxel (taxotere) for breast cancer.

    The taxanes, paclitaxel (Taxol) and docetaxal (Taxotere), are a new class of anti-microtubule agents which have shown cytotoxic activity in a number of solid tumours. Phase I and II trials confirm that docetaxal is highly active in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Reported toxicities of docetaxel include, dose limiting neutropenia, alopecia, skin reactions and fluid retention. Here we report the first case of rapid onset, diffuse scleroderma-like illness, which occurred in a 59-year-old female receiving treatment with docetaxel for locally invasive and advanced metastatic breast cancer.
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4/16. radiation-induced morphea occurring after fluoroscopy.

    We describe a patient in whom radiation-induced morphea developed after undergoing fluoroscopically guided repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.
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keywords = radiation-induced
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5/16. Scleroderma-like cutaneous lesions induced by paclitaxel: a case study.

    paclitaxel is a recent antineoplastic agent that belongs to the taxane family. Its activity has been demonstrated in advanced and refractory ovarian, breast, lung, and head and neck cancer. Adverse cutaneous reactions to paclitaxel have been reported, namely bullous fixed drug eruption, onycholysis, acral erythema, erythema multiforme, and pustular eruption. We report the first case of scleroderma-like changes after paclitaxel administration. A 63-year-old patient presented with an edematous and infiltrated erythema of the head, neck, axillae, and left hand 10 days after administration of paclitaxel and paraplatin for primitive peritoneal cancer. Cutaneous lesions improved after a change from paclitaxel to cyclophosphamide. Cutaneous lesions recurred 3 months later, after reintroduction of paclitaxel, and progressively evolved to cutaneous sclerosis. skin biopsy showed a dermal fibrosis. Biologic tests revealed no autoimmunity. Scleroderma-like lesions of this patient were reminiscent of previously reported cases that occurred after administration of docetaxel, which also belongs to the taxan family. Thus, scleroderma-like syndromes seem to represent a unique cutaneous adverse event caused by taxanes.
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6/16. Localized scleroderma in a woman irradiated at two sites for endometrial and breast carcinoma: a case history and a review of the literature.

    Localized scleroderma is an uncommon side-effect of radiotherapy. We report a unique case with multiple asynchronous primary malignant tumors, which developed localized scleroderma after radiotherapy. A 67-year-old healthy woman received external irradiation for endometrial cancer. Three years later she underwent partial mastectomy and postoperative radiotherapy because of breast cancer. A progressive fibrosis developed in the breast. Within 12 months similar skin reactions were also seen in the irradiated abdominal wall and on both lower extremities. Biopsies revealed scleroderma lesions of breast and abdominal wall and scleroderma-like lesions on the legs. The lesions dissolved partially without generalization. This case, in contrast to most of the cases previously reported in the literature, illustrates not only lesions outside of radiation ports, but also that radiotherapy given to one cancer site can affect distant skin at a previously irradiated cancer site. When a localized scleroderma is diagnosed, further curative radiotherapy should be cautiously prescribed irrespective of cancer site.
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7/16. Widespread morphoea following radiotherapy for carcinoma of the breast.

    We report a case of a 60-year-old lady who was treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer of both breasts 8 years apart. Thirteen years after the first dose of radiotherapy she developed localized morphoea in all the irradiated skin of the chest wall and also the gaiter regions of both lower legs. radiation-induced localized morphoea has been previously reported; however, there is no previous publication of an occurrence at a distant site as in this case. This case demonstrates that morphoea can occur distant to the original breast carcinoma and site of radiotherapy. We postulate that radiotherapy can induce neoantigen formation, which initiates a T cell response and subsequent tissue growth factor alpha release. Tissue growth factor alpha induces fibroblast activation and collagen production may persist due to a positive feedback mechanism within the fibroblast. The reason why the disease did not generalize remains unclear.
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keywords = cancer
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8/16. Postirradiation morphea and subcutaneous polyarteritis nodosa: case report and literature review.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of postirradiation morphea and subcutaneous polyarteritis nodosa occurring simultaneously in a patient and to review the literature on postirradiation autoimmune phenomenon and the potential pathogenesis of such changes. methods: A 75-year-old woman with breast cancer treated with chemotherapy and radiation who developed postirradiation morphea and subcutaneous polyarteritis nodosa, both inside and outside of the field of radiation, is described. literature searches were performed on postirradiation morphea and other radiation-related inflammatory cutaneous conditions and the potential pathogenic mechanisms involved. RESULTS: Twenty-five cases of postirradiation morphea and 8 cases of postirradiation panniculitis were reported in the literature. Only 3 cases of morphea with distant vasculitis occurring in the same patient have been reported and each of these patients had features suggestive of an underlying connective tissue disease. This is the first case of morphea and subcutaneous polyarteritis nodosa occurring in the same location both inside and outside the field of radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Postirradiation morphea is an uncommon condition but is being increasingly recognized. Related phenomena following radiation include postirradiation panniculitis and now postirradiation subcutaneous polyarteritis nodosa. radiation may be responsible for inducing some of the pathogenic changes seen in scleroderma and other autoimmune diseases. Rheumatologists should be aware of these potential complications of radiation treatment.
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keywords = cancer
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9/16. Disabling pansclerotic morphea: clinical presentation in two adults.

    Disabling pansclerotic morphea involves all layers of the skin, extending through the dermis and subcutaneous tissues to involve muscle, tendon, and bone. It is distinguished from generalized scleroderma by its lack of systemic involvement. Onset usually occurs before the age of 14 years. We describe adult-onset disabling pansclerotic morphea in two previously healthy young men. In both cases, the onset of disease was explosive, with rapid progression, widespread cutaneous involvement, and severe disablement caused by mutilating contracture deformities. Increased susceptibility of sclerodermatous tissue to recalcitrant ulceration and malignant transformation with development of nonmelanoma skin cancers was also observed. Treatment of this disease continues to present a therapeutic dilemma with only sporadic remission despite multimodality therapy.
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keywords = cancer
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10/16. Palmoplantar keratoderma with sclerodactyly (Huriez syndrome).

    A syndrome characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma, sclerodactyly, and skin cancer was first described in two families by Huriez et al. The pattern of inheritance was compatible with that of an autosomal dominant disorder. We report a patient with this condition and review the literature.
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keywords = cancer
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