Cases reported "Scotoma"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/11. Visual field change in eyes with retinal pigment epithelial tear.

    PURPOSE: To study the effects of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) deprivation on retinal sensitivity with serial automated static perimetry in cases of RPE tear involving the foveal area. methods: Two eyes with a tear of the RPE were diagnosed as such on biomicroscopic and fluorescein angiographic examination. Static perimetry was performed in the follow-up study with the Humphrey field analyzer central 10-2 program. RESULTS: The first patient showed a dense scotoma corresponding to a defect in the RPE, which showed mild deterioration throughout the follow-up period from 2-11 weeks after the development of RPE tear. In contrast, the second patient showed preserved visual acuity and an absence of central visual field defects, despite an apparently denuded bruch membrane involving the fovea during 8-month follow-up. CONCLUSION: Apparent RPE defect in eyes with RPE tears may or may not be associated with severe visual field defects. The pathophysiology of the disease should be studied, considering these perimetric findings.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/11. Surgical removal of subfoveal choroidal neovascular membranes in high myopia.

    BACKGROUND: A study was carried out to elucidate the anatomical and functional outcome after surgical excision of subfoveal choroidal neovascular membranes in high myopia. methods: Sixty-five patients with high myopia (> or =6 diopters), well-defined subfoveal neovascular membranes on fluorescein angiography and preoperative visual acuity < or =20/100 were selected for surgery. A standardized surgical technique was used in all cases, by a single surgeon. The main outcomes assessed were Snellen visual acuity, surgical retinal pigment epithelium defect and postoperative perfusion of the choriocapillaris. Multifactor analysis of variance and chi-square/Fisher's exact test statistics were used to assess the association between patients' pre- and postoperative characteristics and outcome measures. RESULTS: Follow-up ranged from 6 to 48 months (mean 16 months). Mean postoperative visual acuity (0.18) was significantly better than mean preoperative visual acuity (0.09). visual acuity improved by at least two lines in 29 eyes (45%) and was unchanged in 24 (37%). overall, 43 eyes (66%) had visual acuity of 20/200 or better and 15 (23%), 20/60 or better. Predictive factors with a significant effect on final visual acuity were mean visual acuity, preoperative status of retinal pigment epithelium and postoperative perfusion of the choriocapillaris. Postoperative perfusion was detected in 31 (48%) of the total 65 eyes and in 12 (67%) of the 18 eyes with normal retinal pigment epithelium at baseline. The mean postoperative retinal pigment epithelium defect was 4.6 times larger than the original neovascular membrane. In selected patients, SLO macular scotometry showed areas of retained retinal sensitivity within the atrophic scar. CONCLUSION: The natural history of subfoveal neovascularization in high myopia is rarely visually restorative. By contrast, surgical excision of the membranes is feasible and may restore visual acuity in selected patients. This therapeutic approach merits a formal multicenter clinical trial.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/11. Microbubble retention and failed macular hole surgery.

    This case reports a possible new cause of failed macular hole surgery. Standard macular hole surgery with removal of epiretinal membranes, 16% C3F8, and strict postoperative prone positioning was performed on a patient with stage 4 macular hole. Macular hole surgery failed with retention of a microbubble of C3F8 within the macular hole during the follow-up period. Retention of a microbubble within a macular hole may prevent closure of the hole and be a previously unrecognized cause of failed macular hole surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3911.1045413224
keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/11. Visual field defect caused by nerve fiber layer damage associated with an internal limiting lamina defect after uneventful epiretinal membrane surgery.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of visual field defect caused by damage of the nerve fiber layer associated with an internal limiting lamina defect after uneventful epiretinal membrane peeling. DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: In the right eye, a 43-year-old male patient developed a nasal step and mild inferior arcuate scotoma after uneventful epiretinal membrane surgery without any associated glaucoma. Transmission electron microscopy was performed on the epiretinal membrane specimens. RESULTS: An epiretinal membrane specimen showed adhesion between epiretinal membrane and axons of nerve fiber layer in the area of the internal limiting lamina defect. CONCLUSION: Adhesion between epiretinal membrane and retinal tissue in the area of the internal limiting lamina defect may cause damage of the nerve fiber layer and visual field defect after epiretinal membrane peeling.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 43022.149954547
keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/11. Computerised visual field deficits in tears of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    Retinal Pigment epithelial tears have been well documented as a complication of pigment epithelial detachment in patients with age related macular degeneration. Spontaneous and iatrogenic separation of detached retinal pigment epithelium, with subsequent retraction and exposure of the underlying choriocapillaris and Bruch's membrane, usually results in poor visual function in the affected areas. However, exact characterisation of the resultant scotomas has not been previously described. We present two patients with spontaneous pigment epithelial tears who underwent Octopus computerised visual field analysis. The density and characteristics of their associated field loss is compared with their clinical and fluorescein angiographic appearance.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/11. Presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome.

    Presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (POHS) is a commonly observed fungal infection. Ocular findings include peripapillary atrophy, peripheral punched-out lesions, and a macular subretinal neovascular membrane. Laser photocoagulation can be beneficial in reducing visual loss from macular scarring due to subretinal neovascular membranes. Herein we describe a patient with POHS in which laser treatment regressed a parafoveal subretinal neovascular membrane. Her vision improved from 20/70 to 20/20 in the treated eye.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/11. Laser treatment in maculopathy of pseudoxanthoma elasticum.

    We report a case of pseudoxanthoma elasticum with exudative retinopathy which was treated with the argon laser and in which the visual acuity was preserved and the subretinal neovascular membrane obliterated for ten months. Laser treatment seems to have helped this case although the same treatment has stimulated the development of subretinal neovascular membranes. These cases must be treated cautiously.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/11. Patterned anomalies of the retinal pigment epithelium: dystrophy or syndrome?

    Under the heading of patterned dystrophies of the central pigment epithelium have been included, in some recent publications, the reticular and macroreticular dystrophies described respectively by Sjogren and Mesker et al. (both probably autosomal recessive hereditary conditions) as well as Deutman's butterfly-shaped dystrophy and fundus pulverulentus (both with autosomal dominant heredity), occurring in a few families. We have recently seen 6 patients with patterned anomalies of the central retinal pigment epithelium. The cause of this pigment anomaly was different in each case: Stargardt's macular degeneration associated with fundus flavimaculatus, drusen of Bruch's membrane, choroidal folds, adult (non-hereditary) vitelliform degeneration, bull's eye degeneration of the macula in chronic rheumatoid arthritis, and detachment of the pigment epithelium. In only one case, that of Stargardt's degeneration, was the condition hereditary (autosomal recessive) so that the term dystrophy (= hereditary degeneration) would be justified; all the other cases were non-hereditary conditions. The central retinal pigment epithelium can only react in a limited number of ways to pathological stimuli: one way is the patterned distribution of pigment. This argues against the concept of patterned dystrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, especially as under this heading conditions with different hereditary characteristics are lumped together.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/11. Vascular anastomoses in ocular toxoplasmosis.

    toxoplasmosis is a frequent cause of uveitis seen in clinical practice and fundus scars typical of ocular toxoplasmosis are common. It has been reported that vascular anastomoses between the retinal and choroidal circulation can occur through the damaged Bruch's membrane in fundus scars resulting from ocular toxoplasmosis. Although it has been stated that these vascular anastomoses are a rare occurrence, it has also been suggested that they are relatively common. In order to determine the prevalence rate of patients with vascular anastomoses in toxoplasmic fundus scars, 3,850 consecutive optometry patient files were studied retrospectively. Seventy-four patients (1.92%) had a clinical diagnosis of ocular toxoplasmosis with typical fundus scars, and two of these patients (2.70%) had documented vascular anastomoses.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/11. Visual field loss following vitreous surgery.

    OBJECTIVE: To assess possible causes of visual field loss following vitreous surgery. DESIGN: charts of 8 patients prospectively identified, who developed visual field loss following vitreous surgery, were reviewed to characterize this newly recognized syndrome and assess possible causes. RESULTS: Two patients had preexisting chronic open-angle glaucoma and 1 had ocular hypertension. Indications for surgery included 4 eyes with macular holes, 1 eye with epiretinal membrane, 2 eyes with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, and 1 eye with retinal detachment and giant retinal tear. All patients received retrobulbar anesthesia. Seven of 8 patients had fluid/gas exchange with installation of long-acting bubbles. In 1 patient with a macular hole, a small hemorrhage was noted along a vessel coming off the nerve superotemporally while attempting to engage the posterior cortical vitreous intraoperatively. This patient developed an inferior visual field defect. No intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements greater than 26 mm Hg were recorded in any eye perioperatively. Visual field defects included 4 eyes with inferotemporal defects, 2 eyes with inferior altitudinal defects, 1 eye with a cecocentral scotoma, and 1 eye with a superonasal defect. Only 1 patient had worsened visual acuity. A relative afferent pupillary defect was observed in 4 eyes and disc pallor in 5 eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Central or peripheral visual field loss can now be recognized as a possible complication of vitreous surgery. In some cases, a relative afferent pupillary defect and optic disc pallor are present, suggesting that the optic nerve is the site of injury. Possible mechanisms include ischemia due to elevated IOP or fluctuations in IOP, optic nerve damage from retrobulbar injection, direct intraoperative mechanical trauma to the optic nerve, indirect injury from vigorous suction near the optic nerve leading to shearing of peripapillary axons or vessels, or a combination of these. Certain optic nerves may be more susceptible to injury because of preexisting compromise from glaucoma or vascular disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3911.1045413224
keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Scotoma'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.