Cases reported "Seizures, Febrile"

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1/6. Influenza A encephalitis with movement disorder.

    Influenza A is an uncommon but well-recognized cause of viral encephalitis in childhood, occurring most commonly during community influenza outbreaks. The authors report four cases of influenza A encephalitis that occurred during an Australian epidemic in 1997-1998. Choreoathetosis during the acute phase of infection or basal ganglia involvement on neuroimaging was observed in three of the four patients. These findings in pediatric encephalitis are suggestive of influenza A infection and may guide investigation and early diagnosis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis
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2/6. Influenza encephalopathy associated with infection with human herpesvirus 6 and/or human herpesvirus 7.

    Influenza-associated encephalopathy is often reported in young Japanese children, but its pathogenesis is unknown. Although influenza virus can be demonstrated by throat culture for patients with encephalopathy, cultures of samples of cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) do not yield the virus. Eight patients with encephalopathy or complicated febrile convulsions had influenza virus infection diagnosed by means of culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), or rapid diagnosis using throat swabs. In all 8 cases, the results of PCR testing of CSF specimens for influenza virus were negative. On the other hand, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) dna was demonstrated in CSF specimens obtained from 2 of 8 patients. In 3 of 8 patients, the presence of human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) dna was demonstrated in CSF specimens. Some cases of influenza-associated encephalopathy reported in japan may be attributable to a dual infection with influenza virus and HHV-6, -7, or both. Another possibility is that latent HHV-6 or HHV-7 in the brain is reactivated by influenza, causing encephalopathy or febrile convulsions.
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ranking = 9.1765208931958
keywords = human herpesvirus, herpesvirus
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3/6. Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome and elevated interleukin-6: case report.

    We report a 2-year-old boy who developed hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome with left-sided hemiplegia after a seizure lasting 35 minutes. The interleukin-6 level in the cerebrospinal fluid 2 hours after seizure onset was elevated to levels seen in patients with encephalitis. At 1 year after onset of the seizure, the patient remained hemiplegic on the left side, and magnetic resonance imaging showed severe right hemispheric atrophy. Acute changes seen on imaging studies and electroencephalograms in this patient were consistent with seizure-induced brain damage. Elevation of cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-6 may be related to the severe neurologic sequelae of our patient despite the relatively short seizure duration.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = encephalitis
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4/6. Uncommon complication of herpes simplex encephalitis.

    A 9-year-old-girl who had herpes simplex encephalitis developed impending uncal herniation requiring surgical decompression. This case highlights the development of an uncommon complication despite the early initiation of treatment with acyclovir.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = encephalitis
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5/6. Postinfectious myeloradiculoneuropathy with cranial nerve involvements associated with human herpesvirus 7 infection.

    BACKGROUND: infection with human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) generally results in a febrile illness with accompanying exanthema subitum. OBJECTIVES: To ascertain and describe the role of HHV-7 in a case of acute myeloradiculoneuropathy. PATIENT: A previously healthy young man with complaints of motor weakness, dysphasia, and nasal voice. methods: Serological examinations were performed with the patient's serum. We also examined virus genome dna in cerebrospinal fluid by regular and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Moreover, we checked the antiganglioside antibody level in the patient's serum samples by the immunoblot analysis. RESULTS: Serological studies revealed significant change in titers of antibodies against cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and HHV-7, but only HHV-7 genome was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid, with its disappearance after therapy. No antiganglioside antibody was detected in the patient's serum. CONCLUSION: The unique clinical picture of the present patient might be closely related to the reactivation of HHV-7 in the nervous system.
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ranking = 4.5882604465979
keywords = human herpesvirus, herpesvirus
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6/6. Idiopathic granulomatous encephalitis mimicking malignant brain tumor.

    Idiopathic granulomatous encephalitis is a rare disorder of unknown etiology, undetermined treatment, and often grave prognosis. This article describes a 4-year-old female who presented with a single focal febrile convulsion followed a few weeks later by right-sided hemiparesis. A huge infiltrative cerebral mass tumor was found which proved to be a granuloma on histologic study. Despite a thorough evaluation, including tissue studies and search for an infectious agent, no etiology could be identified, and the final diagnosis was idiopathic granulomatous encephalitis. Recurrent resections and high-dose steroid treatment failed to control the process, and the patient died of disease 6 months after presentation. Evaluation and treatment of idiopathic granulomatous encephalitis should be aggressive, and the possibility of chemotherapy and perhaps even radiotherapy should be considered if there is no response to steroids.
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ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis
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