Cases reported "Seminoma"

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1/72. seminoma associated with bilateral cryptorchidism in Down's syndrome: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: A case of testicular typical seminoma associated with bilateral undescended testes in Down's syndrome is reported. A 42-year-old institutionalized male patient developed left testicular seminoma with retroperitoneal metastasis. methods/RESULTS: Neither adjuvant chemotherapy nor radiotherapy were performed due to his severe mental retardation. He died as a result of the cancer 2 years after a left radical orchiectomy and an autopsy was carried out. DISCUSSION: Recently an increase in the incidence of the association of testicular tumors and Down's syndrome has been repeatedly documented. Thirty-six cases of testicular tumors associated with Down's syndrome have been reported and of these 17.1% had cryptorchidism. This is a much lower percentage considering the high risk of cryptorchidism in males with Down's syndrome. The relationship between testicular germ cell tumors associated with cryptorchidism and Down's syndrome is discussed.
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2/72. Tubular seminoma of the testis.

    A case of tubular seminoma in a 33-year-old man is reported. The tumor occurred in his right testis, measuring 7 x 6 x 6 cm in size. Microscopically, most of the tumor cells were arranged in solid or hollow tubular patterns. The tumor cells had round nuclei with vesicular chromatin and clear or granular cytoplasm, characteristic features of seminoma cells. A classic seminoma component and intratubular atypical germ cells occupying approximately 5% of the tumor area were noted. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the tumor cells were diffusely placental alkaline phosphatase and vimentin positive, and focally cytokeratin positive. These findings are consistent with a tubular seminoma. The differential diagnoses are discussed.
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3/72. seminoma in a 31-year-old patient on long-term growth hormone therapy.

    We describe a Caucasian male patient aged 31, who was referred to the Institute of reproductive medicine because of infertility and androgen deficiency and in whom we incidentally diagnosed a unilateral testicular tumor. The patient had received growth hormone (GH) since the age of 8 years. One case presenting with testicular neoplasm under growth hormone substitution has been described previously. In conclusion, it cannot be ruled out that GH treatment may be involved in the pathogenesis of germ cell tumor development. Special care should be exercised when patients with a history of maldescended testes require GH substitution. This care should include regular testicular ultrasonography at e.g. half-yearly intervals since sonography may detect testicular tumors long before they become clinically apparent.
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4/72. Primary testicular seminoma in a patient with a history of extragonadal non-seminomatous germ cell carcinoma.

    Extragonadal germ cell carcinoma represents between 3% and 5% of all germ cell carcinomas. A metachronous primary germ cell carcinoma is exceedingly rare in these patients. We report the eighth case, which occurred in a 29-year-old man who presented with testicular seminoma 7 years after his initial presentation with extragonadal non-seminomatous germ cell carcinoma. The seven other patients also presented with extragonadal non-seminomatous germ cell carcinoma, followed subsequently by testicular seminoma in 6 patients and non-seminomatous germ cell carcinoma in the seventh. The mean time to presentation was 8 years. Although rare, this case emphasizes the need for long-term surveillance, including testicular evaluation of patients with a history of extragonadal germ cell carcinoma.
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5/72. Intracranial dural metastasis of mediastinal seminoma--case report.

    A 24-year-old male presented with a rare intracranial dural metastasis from a mediastinal germ cell tumor infiltrating the superior vena cava, pericardium, ascending aorta, and lung. Routine chest radiography incidentally revealed the abnormal mediastinum, which was partially resected after median sternotomy, followed by radiotherapy. One year after the radiotherapy, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a right parasagittal tumor mimicking a meningioma. Partial tumor removal was performed. Two cycles of chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide were then performed, and the residual tumor almost completely disappeared. The histological diagnosis of both the mediastinal and intracranial tumors was pure seminoma. Sections of metastatic tumor revealed several thick fibrous septa and numerous epithelioid granulomas infiltrated by plasma cells, intermingled between the clusters of tumor cells. Follow up of patients apparently in remission from mediastinal seminoma without evidence of advanced or recurrent disease at other sites is recommended.
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6/72. Peritoneal carcinomatosis in germ-cell tumor: relations with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection.

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis from germ-cell tumor has rarely been described, and thus remains largely unknown. We report here five cases involving this entity. All five patients had embryonal carcinoma in their primary germ-cell tumor. Four of them had undergone retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND), and viable malignant cells were found. RPLND was performed for relapses (n = 3) and as primary therapy for stage II disease (n = 1). The peritoneum was the only site of relapse in three patients, and was associated with pleural effusion in one. The time to relapse after RPLND ranged from 6 to 14 months. One patient sustained injury to lymph nodes during RPLND, and another patient had a peritoneal xanthelasma. The only three patients already described in the literature underwent RPLND or surgical biopsy. All these observations suggest a striking relation between RPLND and occurrence of subsequent peritoneal carcinomatosis.
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7/72. Synchronous appearance of germ cell tumor and papillary carcinoma of the thyroid.

    Synchronous appearance of 2 different malignancies in one patient is a rare phenomenon. We describe our experience of 2 patients with synchronous malignancies of the testis and thyroid gland, and of a third patient who developed a thyroid neoplasm unrelated to recent treatment for a germ cell tumor. The medical records of 3 male patients treated for both a germ cell tumor and a thyroid cancer between 1989 and 1994 were reviewed. Two patients with nonseminomatous germ cell tumor received postoperative chemotherapy after orchiectomy and developed a papillary carcinoma of the thyroid during treatment. A third patient, who received radiation therapy for a clinical stage 1 seminoma, recurred with biopsy proven seminoma in the neck in association with a thyroid nodule 2 years later. All 3 patients had their thyroid cancer treated by surgical resection, and one received adjuvant radioactive iodine. Two of the patients are currently alive and disease-free. One patient died of pulmonary complications that stemmed from bleomycin toxicity. Synchronous appearance of germ cell tumor and papillary carcinoma of the thyroid has not been previously described. Genetic predisposition may play a role in the development of such simultaneous neoplasms.
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8/72. Primary retroperitoneal seminoma with utrasonically abnormal testes.

    Primary retroperitoneal seminomas account for approximately 2% of all seminomas. Differentiating the primary retroperitoneal tumor from a metastatic tumor with an occult testicular primary remains difficult despite the availability of ultrasonic examination. We present a case of primary retroperitoneal seminoma with ultrasonically demonstrated abnormalities in both testes. The patient underwent a unilateral orchiectomy and ultrasound-guided biopsy of the opposite testis. All surgical specimens were negative for testis cancer. Controversial issues in the diagnosis and treatment of primary retroperitoneal germ cell tumors are discussed.
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9/72. Spontaneous acute tumour lysis syndrome in patients with metastatic germ cell tumours. Report of two cases.

    Acute tumour lysis syndrome (TLS), a condition resulting from rapid destruction of tumour cells with massive release of cellular breakdown products, has been described following the treatment of various malignancies. However, spontaneous TLS has been described only rarely. Germ cell tumours (GCT) have a rapid cell turnover and often present with bulky metastatic disease. We report two cases of patients with metastatic GCT presenting with acute renal failure attributable to spontaneous TLS. All clinical and biochemical features of the syndrome were present. Both patients were treated with haemodialysis and intravenous administration of single-agent etoposide between dialysis sessions, resulting in recovery of renal function and marked decrease in tumour bulk within the first week after presentation. These cases are the first reported instances of spontaneous TLS in poor-risk metastatic GCT. Successful treatment with dialysis and chemotherapy is possible, and prophylactic vigorous hydration and allopurinol may be warranted in this setting.
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keywords = germ
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10/72. Arterial occlusive events during chemotherapy for germ cell cancer.

    During four courses of chemotherapy for a disseminated testicular seminoma a 30-year-old man developed three arterial occlusive events and one silent myocardial infarction. The events occurred approximately 10 days after the start of each chemotherapy course. During chemotherapy suggested pathogenetic factors were monitored without observing any significant abnormality. After completion of chemotherapy the patient remained in a complete remission and free of new thromboembolic events. A review of possible pathogenetic factors is given.
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