Cases reported "Sensation Disorders"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/71. Chronic axonal sensory and autonomic polyneuropathy without motor involvement: a new 'chronic inflammatory neuropathy?'.

    We report the case of a woman with axonal sensory and autonomic neuropathy lasting several months who improved in association with steroid administration. During the course of her disease and in the follow-up, the patient underwent repeated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations, neurophysiological somatic, autonomic nervous system studies and sural nerve biopsy. Clinical and laboratory assessments demonstrated the occurrence of a monophasic, chronic sensory and autonomic neuropathy. A sural nerve biopsy suggested an axonopathy. After a progressive worsening of symptoms lasting about 6 months, steroid treatment was started and within 6 months a complete recovery, with normalization of the CSF findings, was observed. Although the 'chronic inflammatory neuropathies' are still debated entities, the features of this chronic, exclusively sensory and autonomic neuropathy are new, and the occurrence of a high protein level in the CSF, together with the favorable outcome associated with steroid treatment, suggests that our case might be another variant in this debated area.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/71. A case of McLeod syndrome with chronic renal failure.

    A 50-year-old man with the rare McLeod syndrome, associated with glomerular lesion to the end stage of chronic renal failure and death, is reported. McLeod syndrome is an X-linked recessive disorder on the basis of abnormal expression of the Kell blood group antigens and absence of erythrocyte surface Kx antigen. Most often the clinical and pathological findings are retinitis pigmentosa to blindness, progressive chronic neuropathy, cortical atrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and glomerular lesion with chronic renal failure. Among the laboratory parameters the most important are very low level of cholesterol and triglycerides, then various numbers of acanthocytes in peripheral blood smears and sometimes in urine (as in our case).
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.090909090909091
keywords = neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/71. Acute mercury vapour poisoning in a shipyard worker--a case report.

    Acute mercury vapour poisoning is a serious, potentially fatal but fortunately rarely encountered problem. It is most commonly due to industrial accidents. The vapour is a direct respiratory tract irritant as well as a cell poison, exerting its greatest effects in the lungs, nervous system, kidneys and liver. We present a case of mercury vapour poisoning in a shipyard workers presenting as an acute chemical pneumonitis, which resolved with aggressive supportive therapy. Further investigations later revealed transient mild neuropsychiatric symptoms, and residual peripheral neuropathy. No chelation therapy was instituted. The detailed investigative work that led to the discovery of the source of mercury is also presented. This case alerts us to the potential hazard to shipyard workers who may work in ships previously carrying oil contaminated with mercury. There have been no previous reports of mercury poisoning in shipyard workers. A high index of suspicion leading to early diagnosis and institution of appropriate supportive measures in suspected cases can be life-saving.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.090909090909091
keywords = neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/71. Subacute sensory neuropathy associated with Epstein-Barr virus.

    A 35-year-old man experienced severe sensory loss, pseudoathetosis, and areflexia during recovery from a severe viral illness. Sensory nerve action potentials were absent, motor conduction velocities were mildly slowed, and blink reflexes were normal. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed abnormal signal within the central and dorsal aspects of the thoracic cord. Acute and convalescent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) titers suggested EBV as the etiology. Subacute sensory neuropathy, with peripheral and central nervous system involvement, is a rare complication of EBV infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.45454545454545
keywords = neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/71. Acute axonal polyneuropathy in chronic alcoholism and malnutrition.

    In contrast to the classic, slowly progressive polyneuropathy in alcoholic patients, acute forms, clinically mimicking guillain-barre syndrome, are rare. We present a patient who developed motor weakness and sensory loss in all four limbs within four days. Laboratory data were consistent with long-term alcohol abuse and documented thiamine deficiency. Repeated cerebrospinal fluid examinations were normal. Electrophysiological studies showed an acute sensorimotor polyneuropathy with predominantly axonal involvement. We conclude that acute alcoholic neuropathy has to be distinguished from guillain-barre syndrome and other forms of acute polyneuropathy by using clinical, laboratory, and electrophysiological data. Both ethanol toxicity and vitamin deficiency could play a role in the pathogenesis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.72727272727273
keywords = neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/71. Acute sensory neuropathy in an adolescent girl following BCG vaccination.

    A 13-year-old girl developed a sensory neuropathy following bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination, consistent with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy or acute sensory axonal neuropathy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.63636363636364
keywords = neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/71. cauda equina syndrome due to lumbosacral arachnoid cysts in children.

    We describe the clinical, neuroradiological and surgical aspects of two children in whom symptoms attributable to cauda equina compression were caused by spinal arachnoid cysts. The first patient presented with recurrent urinary tract infections due to neurogenic bladder dysfunction, absent deep tendon reflexes and sensory deficit in the lower limbs. The second child presented with unstable gait as a result of weakness and diminished sensation in the lower extremities. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lumbosacral arachnoid cyst in both patients. During surgery the cysts were identified and excised. Two years after surgery, the sensory deficits of the first patient have disappeared and patellar and ankle reflexes can be elicited, but there is no improvement in bladder function. Neurological examination of the second patient was normal. We conclude that the diagnosis of cauda equina syndrome should prompt a vigorous search for its aetiology. Lumbosacral arachnoid cysts are a rare cause of cauda equina syndrome in children.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.6498560789018E-6
keywords = deep
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/71. Inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy associated with interstitial lung disease.

    A 58-year-old woman presented with inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy accompanied by sensory and motor disturbance and interstitial lung disease. Corticosteroid therapy led to a marked amelioration of both the neuropathy and the lung disease. We suggest that a demyelinating neuropathy is associated with an interstitial lung disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.63636363636364
keywords = neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/71. Morphometric evaluation of paraneoplastic neuropathies associated with carcinomas, lymphomas, and dysproteinemias.

    Paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathies are caused by indirect effects of carcinomas, mainly small cell bronchogenic carcinomas, lymphoproliferative disorders (lymphomas, myelomas, polycythemia vera), and dysproteinemias (benign monoclonal paraproteinemia, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia) including cryoglobulinemias. Those associated with carcinomas are usually considered as severe, those associated with benign gammopathies (monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance, MGUS) as mild, and those with cryoglobulinemias as of variable severity. In a larger series of 104 autopsy and biopsy cases, we noted a wide range of severity concerning various morphometric parameters of peripheral nerve fibers by evaluating sural nerves. There were no apparent morphometric differences between the groups of disorders. The most valuable parameter of optic-electronic evaluation and comparison turned out to be the myelin area expressed as a percentage of the endoneurial area because this measure comprises the relative number, size, and myelin thickness of the myelinated nerve fibers. In the 104 cases of the three disease groups, most of the cases (38 cases; 36.5%) showed a moderate reduction of the myelin sheath area per endoneurial area of sural nerves. This was followed by 34 cases (32.7%) with severe and very severe reduction. Twenty-nine cases (27.9%) presented with mild reduction. It is concluded that the severity of the neuropathy depends largely on the stage of the disease and the time of progression rather than on the type of the underlying disorder.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.090909090909091
keywords = neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/71. Sensory guillain-barre syndrome.

    OBJECTIVE: To report eight cases of sensory guillain-barre syndrome (GBS). BACKGROUND: The concept of sensory equivalent to ascending paralysis of GBS was raised in 1958, and the diagnostic criteria for a sensory loss and areflexia variant of GBS were proposed in 1981. However, clinical cases meeting these criteria have been relatively scarce. methods: During a 13-year period between 1986 and 1999, the authors collected eight cases of an acute sensory demyelinating neuropathy that met most of the proposed diagnostic criteria of a sensory variant of GBS. RESULTS: In all patients, sensory neuropathy was sudden at onset and peaked to maximal deficit within 4 weeks. In five (63%) cases, there was an antecedent viral illness. All patients had objective sensory loss and diminished or absent reflexes. None showed any muscle weakness. In all four patients in whom the spinal fluid was examined during the first 4 weeks, there was albuminocytologic dissociation. All of the patients had electrophysiologic evidence of demyelination in at least two nerves. Demyelination was demonstrated in motor nerve conduction in seven patients and in sensory nerve conduction in one, indicating that motor nerve conduction studies were the key for the diagnosis of demyelinating neuropathy. All patients had sensory nerve conduction abnormalities in at least one nerve. Three patients responded to immunotherapies. All had a favorable outcome, with a monophasic course of disease and no sign of relapse. CONCLUSION: The current study confirms the existence of sensory GBS.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.27272727272727
keywords = neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Sensation Disorders'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.