Cases reported "Sensation Disorders"

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1/5. Poststeroid balance disorder--a case report in a body builder.

    The authors describe a case of poststeroid balance disorder in a 20-year-old athlete. Previous information of such a doping pathology among sportsmen taking anabolics was not found. That anabolic steroids had a harm to central activities and could be suspected especially on the basis of reported psychiatric sequels and cerebrovascular disorders. The case described is of a patient who had been given metandienone, oxymetholone, and nandrolone phenyloproprionate in two courses. vertigo appeared twice just after introducing doping and persisted in spite of a 1.5 year break in taking anabolics. In the electronystagmography a positional nystagmus was detected, the eye-tracking test was distempered, and abnormal responses in the caloric tests were obtained. In the computed dynamic posturography the number and length of body sway were increased and, consequently, the field of the outspread area was enlarged. The moment of appearance and long-lasting vertigo as well as the results of laboratory examinations indicate a poststeroid permanent disorder of the central part of the equilibrium organ. Such a diagnosis seems to be most probable here.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nystagmus
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2/5. Otorhinolaryngologic manifestations in Chiari malformation.

    The Chiari malformation causes herniation of the cerebellar amygdalae through the foramen magnum, resulting in the descent of the brain stem and/or traction on the lower cranial pairs. It is important for otolaryngologists to recognize Chiari malformations as part of the differential diagnosis of balance disorders, because patients may initially exhibit symptoms related to the vestibular system, including ataxia, nystagmus, or vertigo. We report 2 cases.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nystagmus
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3/5. Positional nystagmus of central origin.

    Audiometric, electrophysiologic, and radiographic findings for a 68-year-old male with an "imbalance" concern are presented. This paper has a two-fold purpose: (1) to present an unusual electronystagmography case study and (2) to highlight the importance of test conditions in lesion localization. The specific disease pathophysiology remains obscure. Repeated hearing tests documented a known hearing impairment with worsening word-recognition ability of the right ear. An initial electronystagmographic exam was normal except for a mild ageotropic direction-changing positional nystagmus with eyes open and fixed. No repeatable click-evoked auditory brainstem response waveforms could be collected. A magnetic resonance imaging of the brain documents diffuse ischemic white matter disease. A repeated vestibular examination some months later supports the initial findings. The case illustrates the importance of following diagnostic protocol, of repeated measures, and of using both a visual fixation and a nonfixation condition for select electronystagmographic subtests.
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ranking = 5
keywords = nystagmus
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4/5. The medullary vascular syndromes revisited.

    There are two major vascular syndromes of the medulla oblongata: the medial and the lateral. The medial medullary syndrome is characterized by the triad of ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy with contralateral hemiparesis and loss of deep sensation. Lateral medullary infarction commonly presents with Horner's syndrome, ataxia, alternating thermoanalgesia, nystagmus, vertigo and hoarseness. Combinations of the two major syndromes occur as bilateral medial medullary, hemimedullary and bilateral lateral medullary syndromes. Each of these syndromes frequently manifests with incomplete or atypical findings depending on the extent of the lesion. magnetic resonance imaging has been useful in the clinical diagnosis of medullary infarctions. The site of the lesion may help predict the arteries involved.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nystagmus
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5/5. Neurotologic manifestations of Chiari 1 malformation.

    It is important for otolaryngologists to recognize Chiari malformations as part of the differential diagnosis of balance disorders because patients may initially be seen with symptoms referable to the vestibular system, including ataxia, nystagmus, or vertigo. The objective of this paper is to review the signs, symptoms, and vestibular test findings of a series of patients with Chiari 1 malformation. Six patients were identified by retrospective chart review with a diagnosis of Chiari malformation. Each patient had a complete otoneurologic examination and vestibular function testing. The results indicated that patients fell into two different vestibular test result profiles. First, patients with advanced symptoms demonstrated oculomotor dysfunction, central vestibular nystagmus, abnormal vestibular visual interaction, and abnormal tilt suppression of postrotatory nystagmus. On the other hand, a number of patients were identified with incidentally noted Chiari malformation on magnetic resonance imaging scan who had a vestibular test profile consistent with peripheral vestibulopathy without signs and symptoms of central nervous system dysfunction. Guidelines are provided to help determine the extent of the group of symptoms attributable to an incidentally discovered Chiari malformation.
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ranking = 3
keywords = nystagmus
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