Cases reported "Serratia Infections"

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1/9. serratia marcescens bacteremia after carotid endarterectomy and coronary artery bypass grafting.

    serratia marcescens is a common, water-borne hospital colonizer. Respiratory secretions, wounds, and urine are frequently recognized areas of Serratia colonization. Serratia bacteremias usually occur nosocomially and are associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. Serratia bacteremias may be primary or secondary from an identifiable source. Hospital-acquired S marcescens bacteremias have no known source in half of the cases. We present a case of nosocomial primary S marcescens bacteremia in a surgical patient successfully treated with levofloxacin.
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keywords = wound
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2/9. Protean infectious types and frequent association with neurosurgical procedures in adult serratia marcescens CNS infections: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    serratia marcescens is a rare pathogen of adult central nervous system (CNS) infection. We report on the clinical features and therapeutic outcomes of two adult patients with such infections. The clinical characteristics of 13 other reported adult cases are also included for analysis. The 15 cases were nine males and six females, aged 19-83 years, in whom, underlying post-neurosurgical states and ear operation were noted in 93% (14/15). fever and conscious disturbance were the most common clinical manifestations of these 15 cases, followed by hydrocephalus, seizures, and wound infections. The manifestation types were protean, including meningitis and focal suppurations such as brain abscess, cranial and spinal epidural abscess, cranial subdural abscess, and infected lumbar pseudomeningocele. One case of S. marcescens CNS infection was diagnosed postmortem; the other 14 were diagnosed by the positive culture from CSF or pus. Antibiotic therapy with or without neurosurgical intervention was the management strategy in 14/15 cases. The therapeutic results showed a high mortality rate.
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ranking = 43.043048807231
keywords = wound infection, wound
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3/9. Infection with an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing strain of serratia marcescens following tongue reconstruction.

    We report a case of postsurgical wound infection of polymicrobial etiology caused by serratia marcescens and pseudomonas aeruginosa following the use of a radial forearm free flap for oncological tongue reconstruction. S. marcescens was a producer of SHV-12 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). This is the first report from india of this ESBL. S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa were resistant to the empirical perioperative antibiotics administered. Delay in the recognition of the type of infection and in the institution of appropriate therapy resulted in total loss of the free flap.
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ranking = 43.043048807231
keywords = wound infection, wound
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4/9. serratia marcescens cellulitis in a patient on hemodialysis.

    serratia marcescens is an infrequent cause of cellulitis with only 5 reported cases. Four of the 5 patients were immunocompromised. Additionally, the cellulitis usually occurred at a site contiguous with a wound. We report a case of S. marcescens cellulitis in a patient with end-stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis. The initial presentation was a soft tissue infection that progressed to septic shock. Ultimately, the patient responded to antibiotics and surgical debridement of infected tissue. This case serves as a reminder to consider infections due to gram-negative bacilli as a cause of cellulitis in immuno-compromised patients regardless of the presentation.
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keywords = wound
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5/9. ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection due to serratia marcescens.

    serratia marcescens is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacillus that is most often associated with infections of the respiratory tract, urinary tract, wounds, and bloodstream. Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) with this pathogen are exceedingly infrequent. Even more rare is the association of S. marcescens with infections of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts. To the best of our knowledge, we describe in this report not only the first case of a VP shunt infection by S. marcescens in an adult, but also the first case of a VP shunt infection by this organism in the absence of bowel perforation.
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6/9. Bilateral serratia marcescens keratitis after simultaneous bilateral radial keratotomy.

    PURPOSE/methods: After bilateral simultaneous radial keratotomy, serratia marcescens keratitis, which involved multiple incisions of both eyes, developed in a 46-year-old physician. The keratitis was treated with repeated wound debridement, fortified topical antibiotics, and topical povidone-iodine. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: Six months after radial keratotomy, uncorrected visual acuity was R.E.: 20/25 and L.E.: 20/60, both eyes correctable to 20/20. health-care workers who undergo refractive surgery may be at increased risk of acquired postoperative infections because of their work environment. Although the occurrence of simultaneous bilateral ulcerative keratitis after simultaneous bilateral radial keratotomy is rare, it is nonetheless a real possibility, making it prudent to perform radial keratotomy on one eye at a time.
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7/9. Nosocomial transmission of Serratia odorifera biogroup. 2: Case report demonstration by macrorestriction analysis of chromosomal dna using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate a cluster of Serratia odorifera in a cardiothoracic surgery unit (CTSU) and to evaluate the applicability of three typing methods for this species. DESIGN: During a surveillance surgical wound study, S odorifera was isolated from two patients in the CTSU. The patients' hospital charts were reviewed for the details of surgery and for common personnel, procedures, or medications. Cultures were obtained of water, soap, and unit dose medications from the CTSU, the operating room, and the surgical intensive care unit. The isolates' antibiograms, biotypes (Vitek identification card and API 20E), and patterns of chromosomal dna (chrDNA) by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were examined. S odorifera isolates from our organism collection were used as controls. SETTING: A 900-bed university hospital with a 22-bed CTSU. RESULTS: ChrDNA patterns of isolates from the two patients were identical, suggesting a possible nosocomial source. However, no source of organisms or mode of transmission was identified. Neither biotype nor antibiogram were useful for epidemiologically typing S odorifera, and PFGE was necessary to discriminate among isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Although rarely isolated, S odorifera and other non-marcescens Serratia species may cause nosocomial outbreaks. PFGE of chrDNA seems to be a reliable method for epidemiologically typing this species.
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8/9. serratia marcescens as a cause of postoperative infection in a total joint implant.

    serratia marcescens is a rare cause of musculoskeletal infections and osteomyelitis occurring most frequently in nosocomial infections, debilitated patients, drug addicts, and traumatic open wounds. It is rarely a cause of postoperative infection in elective surgery with only a few such cases being reported in the united states and European literature. The authors present a case of serratia marcescens infection of a total joint implant from an apparent perioperative source and review the literature concerning this organism as a cause of infection in man.
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9/9. Spontaneous healing of a massive tibial cortical defect.

    This case report describes the spontaneous healing of a 20-cm massive tibial cortical defect. The defect was created during debridement of necrotic bone and soft tissue in a low-velocity gunshot wound of the tibia that became infected in a skeletally mature patient. The patient was treated in an external fixator and had a soleus flap to provide soft-tissue coverage. He had refused any surgical reconstructive options. Despite the absence of surgical reconstruction, his tibia healed, and he returned to full activity without any orthotic device 9 months after the original injury.
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