Cases reported "Shock, Septic"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/55. serratia marcescens cellulitis in a patient on hemodialysis.

    serratia marcescens is an infrequent cause of cellulitis with only 5 reported cases. Four of the 5 patients were immunocompromised. Additionally, the cellulitis usually occurred at a site contiguous with a wound. We report a case of S. marcescens cellulitis in a patient with end-stage renal disease on chronic hemodialysis. The initial presentation was a soft tissue infection that progressed to septic shock. Ultimately, the patient responded to antibiotics and surgical debridement of infected tissue. This case serves as a reminder to consider infections due to gram-negative bacilli as a cause of cellulitis in immuno-compromised patients regardless of the presentation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/55. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and sepsis manifesting in a patient with chronic rheumatoid arthritis.

    Streptococcal-toxic-shock syndrome is caused by virulent strains of exotoxin-producing streptococcus, almost always group-A organisms such as streptococcus pyogenes. It has often been described in the setting of surgical wounds, burns, childbirth, diabetics, elderly, neonates, and immunocompromised hosts, where the portal of entry is the skin. Our patient was on steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for chronic rheumatoid arthritis and developed this deadly infection after a fall.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/55. Toxic shock syndrome occurring in children with abrasive injuries beneath casts.

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome has been reported in a number of nonmenstrual settings, including orthopedic patients with postoperative staphylococcal wound infections. We describe two cases of toxic shock syndrome in children with focal cutaneous staphylococcal infections occurring beneath casts placed for limb immobilization. These cases illustrate a new and potentially hidden site of staphylococcal infection leading to toxic shock syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 61.195502351253
keywords = wound infection, wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/55. Toxic shock syndrome in an adult male secondary to puncture wound.

    The finding of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a rare, potentially fatal illness that physicians often associate with young, menstruating females. However, TSS is not exclusively a disease of females. We report the unusual case of an adult male patient who presented to the Emergency Department at Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown with toxic shock syndrome secondary from a fish tooth suffered while trout fishing. The diagnostic features of TSS and treatment are also discussed in this article.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/55. Unusual presentation of necrotizing fasciitis in a patient who had achieved long-term remission after irradiation for testicular cancer.

    We report a case of a 60-year-old man with necrotizing fasciitis complicated by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The patient had received high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the pelvis for relapsed seminoma 7 years previously. He had been in long-term remission. He was admitted to the Tsukuba University Hospital, Tsukuba-City, Ibaraki, japan, with complaints of fever and localized erythema over the foreskin. The patient suffered from septic shock and multiple organ failure. Despite intensive care, he died 18 h after admission. streptococcus pyogenes was isolated from both the wound and blood culture. To our knowledge, this is the first description of necrotizing fasciitis primarily affecting the penile skin.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/55. Atypical manifestation of vibrio vulnificus septicaemia.

    vibrio vulnificus is a Gram-negative marine bacterium that may cause local wound infection, gastroenteritis, or septicaemia. Fatal septicaemia usually presents with fever, shock, and large haemorrhagic bullae on the legs. This report is about a man who had severe V. vulnificus septicaemia but presented with atypical features of leg pain and diffuse purpuric skin lesions. V. vulnificus septicaemia should be suspected if the following are present: septic shock, leg pains associated with diffuse purpuric skin lesions, recent consumption of raw seafood, and a past medical history of liver cirrhosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/55. Postoperative toxic shock syndrome after excision of a ganglion cyst from the ankle.

    Postoperative toxic shock syndrome (PTSS) after orthopedic surgery is rare, but early recognition and prompt intervention are essential to minimize morbidity and potential mortality. The diagnosis should be considered in all postoperative patients presenting with fever, hypotension, and systemic illness. The treating surgeon must have not only knowledge of the clinical entity, but also an extremely high index of suspicion, because the diagnosis can be elusive with surgical wounds appearing deceptively benign. Treatment consists of antibiotics, surgical wound debridement, and, more importantly, aggressive supportive care with intravenous fluids and intensive care surveillance. To date, the literature contains relatively few case reports of PTSS after orthopedic procedures, with even fewer cases encountered after foot and ankle surgery. This report describes a patient who developed the rare complication of PTSS after an elective ganglion cyst excision from the ankle.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/55. transplantation of cultured autologous epithelium after meningococcal septicaemia in a 4-year-old with 35% skin loss.

    A 4-year-old girl with scattered full-thickness skin and soft tissue wounds mainly on the extremities and corresponding to roughly 35% of the total body surface area was treated with early excision and transplantation of cultured autologous epidermal grafts. The transplantation was accomplished in one stage, three weeks after admission. The epidermal cells were cultured in Stockholm, sweden and the time of transportation of the grafts to Reykjavik, iceland (seven hours) did not seem to affect the quality, as 85% had taken one week after transplantation. The patient healed completely without further transplantation, but a few local skin flaps were needed to cover exposed articular surfaces. The patient was discharged from hospital with stable grafts five weeks after transplantation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/55. Transmission of 'toxic strep' syndrome from an infected child to a firefighter during CPR.

    Several cases of a toxic shocklike syndrome have been reported in the united states during the past five years in association with streptococcus pyogenes infection. We report a case of a firefighter exposed during attempted CPR to the secretions of an S pyogenes-infected child. The firefighter developed an infection of the hand and subsequent febrile illness with hypotension, erythematous rash, renal failure, and hypocalcemia. Bacterial isolates of blood and cerebrospinal fluid from the deceased child were identical in type and exotoxin production with isolates grown from the hand wound of the firefighter. This is the first reported case of documented transmission of S pyogenes, causing a toxic shocklike syndrome in an emergency medical technician.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/55. Postoperative toxic shock syndrome.

    In summary, non-menstrual TSS is potentially lethal if overlooked. Postoperative TSS can be particularly difficult to diagnose because patients often present with mild nonspecific, "flu like" symptoms and usually do not have evidence of local wound infection. It is therefore important to have a high suspicion index of occult wound infection complicated by TSS in postoperative patients with fever, rash, gastrointestinal symptoms or hypotension.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 122.39100470251
keywords = wound infection, wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Shock, Septic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.