Cases reported "Shock, Septic"

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21/55. Toxic shock syndrome after inguinal hernia repair. Report of a case with patient survival.

    A 40-year-old man developed fulminant multisystem failure several days after elective repair of an inguinal hernia. Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) was diagnosed. There was, however, no evidence of wound infection at the time of multisystem failure. Only later in his hospital course did the wound drain. staphylococcus aureus was cultured from the wound and was the presumed etiologic agent in the patient's life-threatening illness. The patient recovered fully with supportive care, antibiotics, and surgical debridement of the inguinal hernia site. This case is discussed in the context of existing literature on the toxic shock syndrome. The site of infection is typically nonsuppurative, but the systemic manifestations are typically life threatening. The responsible organism is commonly believed to be a strain of S. aureus that expresses a toxin (TSS toxin-1) that effects multisystem failure, but which also diminishes the local inflammatory response and explains the benign appearance of the wound. Although this is a rare clinical entity, elective surgical procedures complicated by fatal TSS have been reported. Surgeons should understand this disease and the management necessary to avert mortality.
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ranking = 1
keywords = wound infection, wound
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22/55. Toxic shock syndrome associated with use of latex nasal packing.

    We treated a previously healthy young man who developed toxic shock syndrome 2 days after elective septoplasty with nonabsorbent latex packing. This case emphasizes that non-menstrual wound-associated toxic shock syndrome can occur after surgery that does not involve absorbent splinting or packing and should be considered in patients who present within a few days after surgery with fever, sunburnlike rash, hypotension, and multisystem complaints and laboratory abnormalities.
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ranking = 0.015577415291937
keywords = wound
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23/55. Toxic shock syndrome associated with staphylococcus aureus sinusitis in children.

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a severe, acute, multisystem illness associated with rash and shock. It is usually associated with a focal infection (e.g., during menstruation associated with tampon use, abscess, surgical wound infection) caused by certain staphylococcus aureus strains. Identification and drainage of the focus of infection may be important in therapy. Occasionally, a focus of infection is not obvious, requiring additional diagnostic procedures. Three cases of children with TSS associated with sinusitis and no other focus of S. aureus infection are presented, demonstrating the important consideration of the perinasal sinuses as a cryptic focus of S. aureus infection causing TSS.
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ranking = 0.95326775412419
keywords = wound infection, wound
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24/55. Postoperative toxic shock syndrome following adrenalectomy: a case report.

    This report describes a fatal case of toxic shock syndrome following surgical procedure of adrenalectomy. Toxic shock syndrome is a severe multisystemic illness associated with staphylococcus aureus infection. The disease is usually associated with menstruation and tampon usage. However, it has recently been reported in the postoperative period following simple surgical procedures. The surgical wound does not usually appear infected. The syndrome is associated with specific strains of Staphylococci producing the toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), that mainly contributes to the illness. The major clinical signs are: fever, diarrhea, cutaneous rash and hypotension. Toxic shock syndrome requires early recognition and prompt aggressive symptomatic treatment based essentially on fluids administration, appropriate intravenous antibiotics and corticosteroids.
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ranking = 0.015577415291937
keywords = wound
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25/55. Toxic shock syndrome in scalded children.

    Five patients showing clinical signs resembling the 'toxic shock syndrome' presented over a 4-month period at the Wessex Regional burns Centre. Toxin-producing isolates of staphylococcus aureus were made from wound swabs in four of the five patients. Four different phage types producing four different toxins were observed. Seven other patients yielded staphylococci from wound swabs but did not develop the toxic shock syndrome. In three of these latter patients the staphylococcus isolated was toxin producing. Since the syndrome carries a significant mortality risk it is desirable that it is recognized and treated without delay. To this end a simplified set of criteria for the identification of probable toxic shock syndrome cases is proposed. The observations suggest that toxic shock syndrome is more common than previously supposed. The syndrome may show a broad spectrum in its clinical presentation, and involve a wide range of staphylococcal phage types with possible involvement of several different enterotoxins.
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ranking = 0.031154830583874
keywords = wound
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26/55. Postoperative toxic shock syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    Toxic shock syndrome is a rare and potentially lethal postoperative complication. The recognition of this disorder can be delayed by the fact that the offending wounds in postoperative toxic shock syndrome are classically benign in appearance. The infrequency with which this syndrome is encountered can also prolong the interval between the onset of symptoms and institution of effective therapy. A case of toxic shock syndrome complicating an abdominoplasty performed at the Plastic Surgery Service of Walter Reed Army Medical Center is presented, and the literature available on toxic shock syndrome in the postoperative patient is discussed.
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ranking = 0.015577415291937
keywords = wound
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27/55. Toxic shock syndrome following diagnostic peritoneal lavage.

    We report the case of a 15-year-old girl who developed high fever, syncope, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, myalgia, pharyngitis, and a desquamating rash eight days after a diagnostic peritoneal lavage. The diagnostic peritoneal lavage wound was erythematous and tender. Incision of the site yielded 10 mL of exudate that cultured staphylococcus aureus. The patient was treated with a first-generation cephalosporin and recovered without sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of toxic shock syndrome following diagnostic peritoneal lavage.
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ranking = 0.015577415291937
keywords = wound
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28/55. The toxic shock syndrome in a burn victim.

    A case of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) in a 6-year-old boy with a 5 per cent body surface area partial thickness scald burn is reported. Biobrane was the wound dressing used initially. The clinical and laboratory characteristics of the syndrome are listed. The syndrome is caused by an exotoxin of Staph. aureus and can occur in the absence of invasive infection. The syndrome, first described in menstruating women who used tampons, has occurred in patients with a variety of wounds. Reports of the TSS syndrome in burn victims are limited to children whose wounds were covered. Children are most vulnerable to the development of TSS because of their limited prior exposure to the toxin.
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ranking = 0.046732245875812
keywords = wound
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29/55. Post-traumatic toxic shock syndrome.

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) associated with Staphylococcus occurs most commonly in menstruating women, although cases in both sexes have been reported. This report describes a severe case of TSS after a relatively minor stab wound. The male patient exhibited all of the major characteristics of this multisystem disease including anuric renal failure. TSS, which can be fatal, may result from surgical and traumatic wound infections and demands prompt recognition and treatment.
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ranking = 0.96884516941613
keywords = wound infection, wound
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30/55. Toxic shock syndrome: odontogenic origin.

    Although the majority of reported cases of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) in the united states continue to be associated with tampon use, TSS also occurs in postpartum women and in patients with pharyngitis, infected surgical wounds, cutaneous and subcutaneous infections, and infections of other body sites. The article presents the case of a 23-year-old black man in whom TSS developed secondary to an odontogenic infection.
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ranking = 0.015577415291937
keywords = wound
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