Cases reported "Shock"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/19. Hemorrhagic adrenal cyst: an unusual reason of acute hypovolemia.

    Adrenal cysts are often asymptomatic and included in the larger "incidentaloma" group. They may reach significant size without onset of compressive symptoms and are often left undiagnosed until an ultrasound or CT scan are performed for a vague lumbar or flank discomfort. Intracystic hemorrhage is a rare but life-threatening complication since a sudden and significant blood loss may occur without any evident clinical source, hypovolemic shock resulting as the first symptom. The authors report their personal experience in two patients along with a review of the literature on this insidious emergency, its diagnosis and therapeutic approach.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/19. scalp laceration: an obvious 'occult' cause of shock.

    scalp lacerations are often present in patients requiring emergency care for blunt trauma. These injuries are most commonly seen in unrestrained drivers or occupants involved in motor vehicle crashes in which the victim is partially or totally ejected. patients with scalp lacerations often have associated injuries that redirect the clinician's attention to other injury sites. Some scalp lacerations are severe enough to cause hypovolemic shock and acute anemia. If the patient arrives in shock, the perfusion pressure may be low, and there may be minimal active scalp bleeding. Under such circumstances, the scalp wound may be initially dismissed as trivial and attention appropriately turned to assuring an adequate airway, establishing intravenous lines, initiating volume resuscitation, and searching for more "occult" sources of blood loss. However, as the blood pressure returns toward normal, bleeding from the scalp wound becomes more profuse and presents a hemostatic challenge to the clinician. A case presentation illustrates some of these issues and confirms the effectiveness of an often overlooked but simple technique to control scalp hemorrhage--Raney clip application.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/19. Hypovolaemic shock.

    Measured blood loss up to 1000 ml is well tolerated by healthy pregnant women. This is partly due to physiological increases in plasma volume and red cell mass during pregnancy. Nevertheless, hypovolaemic shock is a major cause of maternal mortality. Management requires teamwork, co-ordination, speed and adequate facilities to be life-saving. The first priority is rapid fluid replacement. Evidence from randomized trials has established that crystalloids are the fluids of choice over colloids and particularly albumen, which was associated with increased mortality. Rapid access to blood or blood products for transfusion is necessary, as well as laboratory back-up. Further management includes accurate assessment of the site of bleeding; control of the bleeding; diagnosis and management of the underlying condition; supportive therapy; and monitoring of the clinical, haematological and biochemical response to treatment. Bedside diagnostic ultrasound has several applications in the evaluation of obstetric hypovolaemic shock.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/19. Mucosal lesions in the human small intestine in shock.

    Characteristic mucosal lesions in resected small intestinal segments from seven patients are reported. Preoperatively, four patients were in shock and general hypotension while the three remaining cases showed signs of local intestinal hypotension. The microscopic appearance of the mucosal lesions was in all patients identical with that previously observed in the feline and canine small intestine after haemorrhage or local intestinal hypotension. It is proposed that an extravascular short-circuiting of oxygen in the mucosal countercurrent exchanger and an intravascular aggregation of blood cells might produce tissue hypoxia which makes the mucosa vulnerable to enzymatic degradation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.18958807938993
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/19. Puerperal uterine inversion and shock.

    uterine inversion is an unusual and potentially life-threatening event occurring in the third stage of labour. It is associated with significant blood loss, and shock, which may be out of proportion to the haemorrhage, although this is questionable. When managed promptly and aggressively, uterine inversion can result in minimal maternal morbidity and mortality. A recent case is described, followed by a short review of the literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1895880793899
keywords = blood loss, haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/19. Autologous salvaged blood transfusion in spontaneous hemopneumothorax.

    Spontaneous hemopneumothorax (SHP) is a rare clinical entity, and an emergent operation due to continuous bleeding or hypovolemic shock is at times necessary. Although allogeneic blood transfusions are urgently required for significant blood loss, autologous blood transfusions can also be considered in patients with SHP. We herein report two cases of successful autologous blood transfusions using blood in the pleural space, decreasing or obviating the need for allogeneic blood transfusion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/19. Postpartum preeclampsia-induced shock and death: a report of three cases.

    Three patients with preeclampsia died as a result of prolonged postpartum hypotension that was unrelated to blood loss. autopsy failed to reveal a cause of death. The sudden onset of hypotensive shock within 24 hours of delivery occurred in all patients, with coexistent hyponatremia present in the two patients in whom it was evaluated. These three maternal deaths appear to have occurred as a result of the previously described entity of postpartum preeclamptic shock.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/19. Myocardial failure and shock in iron poisoning.

    shock is a well-known complication of iron poisoning. Its aetiology is multifactorial with hypovolaemia due to gastrointestinal blood loss and myocardial depression due to systemic acidosis contributing to its genesis. Primary myocardial dysfunction has not been considered to play a role. Our clinical experiences and autopsy findings in three fatal cases of iron poisoning support myocardial dysfunction and damage as contributing factors to their cardiovascular collapse. The three patients, all female, were 3 1/2, 16 and 28-years-old. Onset of shock occurred at 1, 2 and 5 days post-ingestion. There was no response to vigorous fluid replacement therapy and aggressive catecholamine infusions. Central venous pressures were elevated. Microscopic examination of postmortem tissue showed myocardial damage and the presence of stainable iron. It is speculated that the myocardial depression is mediated by lipid peroxidation of myocyte organelle membranes due to iron catalysed free radical generation. The presence of myocardial dysfunction has therapeutic implications. patients with severe iron poisoning require early and serial measurements of arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure and cardiac output. If primary myocardial dysfunction is documented then fluid replacement, inotropic support and afterload reduction should be considered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/19. rupture of angiomyolipoma of the kidney presenting as puerperal collapse.

    We report an unusual presentation of angiomyolipoma of the kidney. Whilst a conservative surgical approach is ideal, the greatly increased cardiac output in pregnancy makes haemorrhage more severe and hence more radical surgery is often required. The difficulty in reaching a correct pre-operative diagnosis can lead to an unusual approach to nephrectomy, of which the surgeon should be forewarned.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.18958807938993
keywords = haemorrhage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/19. shock-related injury of pancreatic islets of langerhans in newborn and young infants.

    Variable degrees of injury of the pancreatic islets of langerhans, with sparing of the acinar pancreas, were observed in three infants (age range, 1 day to 3 months) who died of profound shock. The duration of shock varied from 19 to 48 hours. In two of the infants, the shock stemmed from hypovolemia; in the remaining infant, the shock followed blood loss, sepsis, and heart failure. The islet lesions were devoid of cellular infiltrates, hemorrhage, and fibrin thrombi. Tissue manifestations of shock included acute renal tubular necrosis, massive hepatic centrilobular necrosis, ischemic enteropathy, and "shock" lung. Study of pancreatic sections from 30 children (age range, 13 hours to 15 years) with clinical and/or morphologic evidence of shock showed no additional instances of islet injury. These findings suggest that pancreatic islets in the young may be vulnerable to shock-induced ischemia. Studies are in progress in an animal model to test this hypothesis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = blood loss
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Shock'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.