Cases reported "Shoulder Pain"

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1/8. An operative technique for recurrent shoulder dislocations in older patients.

    Recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in the elderly is not as exceptional as it was once thought to be. That anterior shoulder dislocation in older patients is caused by a rotator cuff tear through the posterior mechanism is well accepted. However, in the subset of patients who have multiple recurrent or intractable dislocations develop, there may be combined pathologic conditions at work: large or massive rotator cuff tears together with anterior capsulolabral injuries such as a Bankart lesion or fracture of the glenoid rim. These patients have multiple recurrences because of disruption of both the anterior and the posterior stability mechanisms. We suggest a procedure that provides anterior stabilization with the capsular shift technique and that is supplemented by Bankart repair as necessary. The capsule transfer is performed superiorly and posteriorly to close the defect in the cuff. In this way a capsulodesis effect can be achieved that displaces the humeral head downward and produces active centering of the head in the course of abduction. Use of only the anterior capsule for the shift, and not the subscapularis tendon, does not compromise subscapularis function. Between 1990 and 1996, we used this technique to treat 16 patients older than 55 years of age with multiple recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation and massive rotator cuff tear. We report the results for the first 10 patients with a minimum follow-up of 2 years (range 2 to 7 years) and an average follow-up of 52 months. There were 7 excellent results, 2 good results, and 1 fair result according to the Rowe criteria. None of the patients had a recurrence of the dislocation. All the patients regained full or functional range of motion with stable shoulders, and most of them could perform activities of daily living without limitation. The average Constant score was 83%. This procedure appears to be successful in treating older patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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2/8. Severe heterotopic ossification after arthroscopic acromioplasty: a case report.

    Heterotopic ossification is a well-recognized complication of spinal cord injury, closed head injury, total hip arthroplasty, burns, and other trauma and has been observed in various tissues such as muscles, tendons, ligaments, and menisci. Complications of arthroscopic acromioplasty are relatively uncommon and include hematoma, traction neuropathy, infection, acromial fracture, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, and instrument breakage. However, little has been reported on heterotopic ossification of the shoulder, particularly after arthroscopic surgery. Recurrent rotator cuff impingement symptoms caused by small amounts of heterotopic ossification after arthroscopic acromioplasty have been described. We report a case of severe heterotopic ossification about the shoulder after arthroscopic acromioplasty.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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3/8. shoulder pain as an unusual presentation of pneumonia in a stroke patient: a case report.

    Etiologies of shoulder pain in the hemiplegic population, such as glenohumeral subluxation, frozen shoulder, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), have been described extensively. We present an 89-year-old woman with right hemiparesis secondary to ischemic lacunar infarction who developed sudden onset of right shoulder pain on the fifth day of inpatient rehabilitation. The pain was severe, limiting range of motion (ROM) and participation in therapy. Extensive investigations to rule out subluxation, fracture, connective tissue disease, RSD, and pulmonary embolism were negative. Ultimately, her shoulder pain and decreased ROM completely resolved with antibiotic treatment for right lower lobe pneumonia. We conclude that her symptoms were possibly referred pain from diaphragmatic irritation transmitted via right C4 sensory axons in the phrenic nerve, which shares the same dermatome as the right acromion area. This case was an unusual presentation of pneumonia in an elderly woman with hemiplegia. We recommend that pneumonia be considered in the differential diagnoses of shoulder pain.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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4/8. Two cases of isolated first rib fracture.

    Isolated first rib fractures are uncommon. They are usually associated with severe blunt trauma, although other mechanisms have been suggested, these being (a) indirect trauma, (b) sudden contraction of the neck muscles, and (c) stress or fatigue fractures attributable to repeated pull of muscles. Two cases are reported of stress fracture of the first rib, who presented to the accident and emergency department.
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ranking = 7.2263181528374
keywords = fracture, stress fracture
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5/8. pseudarthrosis of the first rib in the overhead athlete.

    Fractures of the first rib are uncommon in athletes and present a different clinical entity from traumatic first rib fracture associated with high energy thoracic trauma. These fractures are stress induced and precipitated by chronic muscular forces acting on the first rib. Typically they heal with conservative treatment. This report describes a fracture of the first rib in a tennis player that developed into a symptomatic pseudarthrosis as a result of persistent overhead activities. Symptoms mimicked ipsilateral shoulder injury. pseudarthrosis of the first rib should be included in the differential diagnosis of chronic persistent shoulder pain in the overhead athlete.
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ranking = 3
keywords = fracture
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6/8. Secondary osteochondromatosis in the subacromial bursa: a report of two cases and review of the literature.

    osteochondromatosis is classified into primary and secondary lesions; primary osteochondromatosis is a tumor-like lesion, whereas secondary lesions are due to such joint or bursal disorders as osteoarthritis and osteochondral fractures. There is no clinical distinction between these two conditions. Only the pathological findings of loose bodies and synovium can clearly distinguish between them. In this report, we present two patients with secondary osteochondromatosis in the subacromial bursa. Both had shoulder pain and were treated surgically. We discuss methods of differentiating between primary and secondary lesions and elucidate the pathogenesis of osteochondromatosis in the subacromial bursa by analyzing findings for 17 shoulders with this condition reported in the literature. We also present two more cases. We reviewed the 12 cases of osteochondromatosis in the literature for histopathological findings of loose bodies and the presence or absence of acromial osteophytes. Our findings suggest that osteochondromatosis of the subacromial bursa is secondary in most cases, and that osteocartilaginous fragments from acromial osteophytes can be shed into the subacromial bursa and grow into loose bodies.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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7/8. Conservative treatment of a patient with previously unresponsive whiplash-associated disorders using clinical biomechanics of posture rehabilitation methods.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the treatment of a patient with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) previously unresponsive to multiple physical therapy and chiropractic treatments, which resolved following Clinical Biomechanics of posture (CBP) rehabilitation methods. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 40-year-old man involved in a high-speed rear-impact collision developed chronic WADs including cervicothoracic, shoulder, and arm pain and headache. The patient was diagnosed with a confirmed chip fracture of the C5 vertebra and cervical and thoracic disk herniations. He was treated with traditional chiropractic and physical therapy modalities but experienced only temporary symptomatic reduction and was later given a whole body permanent impairment rating of 33% by an orthopedic surgeon. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: The patient was treated with CBP mirror-image cervical spine adjustments, exercise, and traction to reduce forward head posture and cervical kyphosis. A presentation of abnormal head protrusion resolved and cervical kyphosis returned to lordosis posttreatment. His initial neck disability index was 46% and 0% at the end of care. Verbal pain rating scales also improved for neck pain (from 5/10 to 0/10). CONCLUSION: A patient with chronic WADs and abnormal head protrusion, cervical kyphosis, and disk herniation experienced an improvement in symptoms and function after the use of CBP rehabilitation protocols when other traditional chiropractic and physical therapy procedures showed little or no lasting improvement.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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8/8. Glenoid fracture nonunion presenting as instability in a young athlete.

    A case of a teenage athlete with a 4-year history of shoulder pain caused by glenoid fracture nonunion is presented. This individual had findings consistent with traumatic anterior shoulder instability as well as normal radiographs. arthroscopy showed a nondisplaced glenoid fracture that was stabilized successfully through a deltopectoral approach.
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ranking = 6
keywords = fracture
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