Cases reported "Sialadenitis"

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1/5. Uncommon histopathological findings in fatal measles infection: pancreatitis, sialoadenitis and thyroiditis.

    AIMS : We report uncommon histopathological findings in fatal measles infection. methods AND RESULTS : We describe the autopsies of four patients who died during a measles outbreak in Sao Paulo, brazil, in 1997. Two of the patients were children receiving chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, one was an adult with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the fourth was an apparently healthy woman. All patients had their deaths attributed to measles pneumonia. The autopsies revealed extensive giant cell pneumonia and diffuse alveolar damage, severe acute pancreatitis, necrotizing sialoadenitis and thyroiditis due to measles. measles antigen was detected in lung tissue using a monoclonal anti-measles antibody. CONCLUSIONS: : pancreatitis, thyroiditis and sialoadenitis are not previously reported histopathological findings in measles infection. pancreatitis is a potentially severe complication and should be considered when treating patients with atypical measles.
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ranking = 1
keywords = necrotizing
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2/5. Subacute necrotizing sialadenitis: a form of necrotizing sialometaplasia?

    OBJECTIVES: To report our experience of subacute necrotizing sialadenitis (SANS), an unusual lesion of the minor salivary palatal glands, and to discuss its relationship with necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS). DESIGN: A retrospective review of records for patients with SANS identified between 1996 and 2001. SETTING: Academic center, referral center, and an ambulatory care center. patients: Three patients (1 woman, 2 men), aged 22, 23, and 40 years at diagnosis. INTERVENTION: All 3 patients underwent incisional biopsy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical description of SANS, ability to make the diagnosis preoperatively, clinical evolution, histologic features, and comparison with the much more frequent NS. RESULTS: Three patients presented with a lateral palatal nodule (1 case bilateral, 1 case ulcerated) of 7 to 10 days' duration, 0.8 to 1.0 cm in size, slightly or not painful. No patient was correctly diagnosed prior to undergoing a biopsy. In all 3 cases, the biopsy specimen showed acinic necrosis surrounded by a dense polymorphous inflammatory infiltrate with atrophy of ductal cells but no squamous metaplasia. Healing occurred without any further treatment in up to 3 weeks. No recurrence was observed in 2 cases; 1 patient was lost to follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: SANS is a painful spontaneously resolving necrosis of the palatal salivary glands, easily misdiagnosed preoperatively. The main differences from NS are smaller size of lesion, scarcity of ulceration, and absence of squamous metaplasia. Although initially described as a new autonomous entity, SANS might be an early or minimal form of NS.
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ranking = 9385.9419153351
keywords = necrotizing sialometaplasia, sialometaplasia, necrotizing
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3/5. NECROTIZING SIALOMETAPLASIA.

    Nonhealing palatal ulcerations in two white male patients, one 50 and another 58 years of age, were clinically suspected of being malignant, even after the initial biopsies were negative. Second biopsies in each case confirmed the original opinions, but the lesions were diagnosed specifically as "necrotizing sialometaplasia". This is an interesting condition of uncertain etiology that can mimic cancer, both clinically and microscopically. The condition heals spontaneously. It should be considered in a differential diagnosis of suspicious lesions of the palate.
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ranking = 1876.188383067
keywords = necrotizing sialometaplasia, sialometaplasia, necrotizing
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4/5. Necrotizing sialometaplasia after bronchoscopy.

    Since the introduction of necrotizing sialometaplasia into the literature as a distinct pathologic entity in 1975, there have been several reports containing microscopic findings consistent with the disease primarily of the hard palate, but also of the soft palate, major salivary glands, retromolar pad of the mandible, and mucous glands of the nasal cavity. Localized ischemia appears to be a common link. All reported lesions heal with or without surgical intervention. Generous incisional biopsy specimens should be taken and aggressive surgery should be avoided.
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ranking = 5552.2998542831
keywords = necrotizing sialometaplasia, sialometaplasia, necrotizing
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5/5. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: literature review and presentation of five cases.

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign, ulcerative, inflammatory process of the minor salivary glands, primarily found in the hard palate. It is often mistaken clinically and histologically for a malignant tumor (that is, mucoepidermoid or squamous cell carcinoma). The lesion heals spontaneously in six to 12 weeks. It occurs primarily in persons between the ages of 40 and 60 and has been reported more frequently in men than women. In necrotizing sialometaplasia the squamous metaplasia and tissue necrosis is confined to the existing ductal and lobular pattern of the salivary glands, a unique characteristic that aids in diagnosis. Five additional cases are presented.
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ranking = 6471.3277220872
keywords = necrotizing sialometaplasia, sialometaplasia, necrotizing
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