Cases reported "Sialorrhea"

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1/9. Somatoform salivary complaints. case reports.

    patients with salivary gland complaints are seen with a large array of signs and symptoms. Usually these patients have an underlying pathophysiological process that can account for their symptoms. However, in a significant number of patients, no known biological process can be found that would account for the patient's complaint. In such cases, somatization is a possible cause. Somatization is a frequently cited feature of patients with various forms of mental illness. In this paper, we will attempt to illustrate the classic signs of a somatoform disorder in three different patients whose diverse salivary complaints fulfill the criteria for a diagnosis of somatoform disease.
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keywords = gland
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2/9. Botulinum toxin as an effective treatment of clozapine-induced hypersalivation.

    Hypersalivation is a common and frequently disabling side effect of atypical neuroleptics such as clozapine. Current treatment options of this adverse advent are limited by lack of efficacy or additional side effects. Botulinum toxin (BTX) injections into the parotid glands have been shown to be very effective in treating sialorrhea in the context of various neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's and motor neuron disease. Surprisingly, BTX treatment of drug-induced sialorrhea has not yet been described. We here report a patient with clozapine-induced hypersalivation and a good response to BTX injections lasting for more than 12 weeks, resulting in a marked reduction of the hypersalivation and consequently of his social withdrawal. Our patient serves to alert clinicians to the frequent problem of drug-induced sialorrhea and suggests that BTX injections should be considered as an effective and safe treatment for hypersalivation in psychiatric patients treated with clozapine.
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3/9. Quantitative reduction of saliva production with botulinum toxin type B injection into the salivary glands.

    Drooling is common in patients with neurological disorders. Recently, botulinum toxin type B has been shown to be effective in the treatment of drooling. The authors present a unique case of a 57-year-old man with a history of a brainstem stroke and severe drooling. The patient's parotid and submandibular glands were injected under ultra-sound guidance with botulinum toxin type B. Saliva was collected and quantified before and after the injections by 2 different collection methods: suctioning and dental rolls. Total saliva production decreased by 23.8% after injection of the parotid glands and by 85.8% after submandibular injection compared to the preinjection level. The 2 methods demonstrated similar results. In addition, the patient experienced less drooling and increased participation in therapies without any side effects. This case demonstrates that saliva secretion and drooling can effectively be treated by injections of botulinum toxin type B into the salivary glands.
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ranking = 66.810896420055
keywords = submandibular, submandibular gland, gland
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4/9. Surgical management of drooling. Case report.

    Drooling occurs when excessive quantities of saliva dribble from the opened mouth. This distressing condition affects many mentally handicapped patients who are unable to effectively clear their normal salivary flow by swallowing. Any method employed for the control of drooling must still allow a sufficient volume of flow for mastication, deglutition and oral hygiene. Surgery is generally indicated for marked or severe cases of drooling and Wilkie's operation involving redirection of the parotid flow into the oropharynx is the most commonly performed surgical procedure. This operation may be combined with bilateral removal of the submandibular salivary glands if the problem is severe.
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ranking = 25.234270329611
keywords = submandibular, gland
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5/9. The use of botulinum toxic injection to treat excessive drooling in children with neurological conditions.

    Drooling is a frequent complaint in children with chronic neurological conditions. This is due to poor neuromuscular coordination of the oropharyngeal musculature. Treatment options such as anticholinergic medications and surgical treatment have generally been unsuccessful or associated with side effects and complications. A new treatment for these children is botulinum toxin injection into the parotid glands to decrease saliva production. This article reports on two cases in which this modality was effectively utilized to treat this neurological condition.
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6/9. Plunging ranula following bilateral submandibular duct transposition.

    Submandibular duct transposition is now a standard surgical procedure for the treatment of severe drooling. However, this is our first experience of a plunging ranula arising as a complication of the technique. In the surgical management of this complication, the single most important step is excision of the sublingual gland to prevent recurrence.
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ranking = 97.937081318443
keywords = submandibular, gland
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7/9. Unilateral enlargement of the parotid gland in a patient with sialosis and contralateral parotid aplasia.

    A case of unilateral aplasia of the parotid gland with sialosis of the contralateral parotid is described, together with a review of the literature. Aplasia and sialosis are both rare conditions of the major salivary glands and do not appear to have been reported previously as occurring together.
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ranking = 6
keywords = gland
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8/9. sialorrhea as a side effect of lithium: a case report.

    A 37-year-old male patient developed sialorrhea while being treated with lithium carbonate. The sialorrhea was associated with salivary gland enlargement and was reversed by discontinuation of lithium. Concomitant treatment with propantheline bromide provided symptomatic relief.
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9/9. Deterioration of feeding behavior following surgical treatment of drooling.

    Few adverse effects of the surgical treatment of drooling are reported in the literature. This report describes a young man with severe extrapyramidal cerebral palsy and profuse drooling whose oral feeding behavior deteriorated following bilateral submandibular gland excision and parotid duct rerouting. Before surgery the patient had safe, functional oral feeding skills, and eating was enjoyable. Following surgery he developed progressive feeding difficulties, weight loss, and aspiration pneumonia. His deterioration led to the placement of a feeding gastrostomy and the end of all oral feedings. Surgery had a disturbing and apparently irreversible negative impact on the patient's quality of life.
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ranking = 36.576626090444
keywords = submandibular, submandibular gland, gland
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