Cases reported "Sick Sinus Syndrome"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/20. Intermittent sinus bigeminy as an expression of sinus parasystole: a case report.

    A case of sinus parasystole is reported. The diagnosis of sinus parasystole is relatively difficult because there is no difference between the basic sinus P wave and the parasystolic wave. Sinus parasystole is diagnosed according to the following electrocardiographic criteria: (1) premature P waves having contour identical to P waves of basic beats; (2) intervals between premature P waves mathematically related. In the case reported, the coupling intervals during long phases of intermittent sinus bigeminy were nearly fixed, because there was little variability in the returning cycles, making the diagnosis of sinus parasystole difficult.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/20. Kawasaki disease in an infant with cystic fibrosis.

    The authors report a case of a 3-month-old infant with a very rare association: cystic fibrosis and Kawasaki disease. The clinical picture is atypical but cardiovascular signs consist of cardiomegaly, sick sinus syndrome and Q waves in D II, D III and AVF. The diagnosis is confirmed by the pathological changes found at the postmortem examination. The patient is the first case of Kawasaki disease reported in romania.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/20. Far-field R wave sensing causing prolongation of the atrial escape interval of DDD pacemakers with atrial-based lower rate timing.

    This report describes the occurrence of prolonged atrial escape intervals (AEI) initiated by sensing of ventricular premature complexes (VPC) without a preceding atrial depolarization or an AV delay in two patients with DDD pacemakers with an atrial-based lower rate response. The prolonged AEIs were due to ventriculoatrial cross-talk so that atrial sensing of the far-field R wave of the VPCs occurred before detection of the R wave by the ventricular channel as a near-field signal. Early atrial sensing of the far-field R wave was promoted by a high atrial sensitivity and/or low ventricular sensitivity and was eliminated by reducing atrial sensitivity and/or increasing ventricular sensitivity. This manifestation of far-field sensing should not be interpreted as malfunction of dual chamber pacemakers with atrial-based lower rate timing.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.4
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/20. Atrial escape-capture bigeminy in dominant atrial rhythm with 2:1 exit block.

    A 27-year-old woman with atrial bigeminy is reported in whom long PP intervals alternate with short PP intervals. All P waves are negative in lead II and all PR intervals measure 0.12 s. In the 12-lead electrocardiogram, however, these P waves were definitely different in configuration from each other, and were divided into two groups. Namely, these negative P waves are divided into those of dominant atrial rhythm J1 with 2:1 exit block, and those of atrial escape J2. Long J1-J2 intervals alternate with short J2-J1 intervals. These electrocardiographic findings show the presence of atrial escape-capture bigeminy. Such atrial escape-capture bigeminy in dominant atrial rhythm with 2:1 exit block has never been reported before.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.6
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/20. ebstein anomaly associated with unusual conduction delay and sick sinus syndrome.

    A 64-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of palpitation, dyspnea on effort, and facial edema. The echocardiographic diagnosis was ebstein anomaly. Although the 12-lead electrocardiogram showed an atrial rate of 150 beats/min and no typical flutter wave, the electrophysiological study showed counterclockwise rotation of excitation along the tricuspid annulus. Because of sinus arrest and syncope, a permanent pacemaker was implanted, but the right atrium was not captured by electrical stimulation at 5 V/0.4 ms, except for the orifice of coronary sinus, and the intracardiac P wave was only 0.2 mV or less. This is a rare case of ebstein anomaly characterized by unusually prolonged conduction in the atrium, the basis of which was global myocardial damage, including the ventricles.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/20. "Sensing alternans" in a patient with a newly implanted pacemaker.

    This report describes the case of an 80-year-old man with a history of coronary artery disease who presented with acute pericarditis secondary to pacemaker lead perforation of the ventricular wall 2 days after undergoing dual lead pacemaker implantation. The electrocardiogram revealed sinus rhythm with an intra-atrial conduction delay and intermittent failure of atrial sensing as evidenced by alternating atrial spikes in every other P wave. The noted pericardial effusion and the likely shifting of the atrial lead with each alternate beat caused the "sensing alternans" that was seen on the admission electrocardiogram.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/20. Sinus parasystole.

    Sinus parasystole is the expression of a protected nondominant sinus pacemaker, which is totally independent of the dominant rhythm. Two forms of sinus parasystole are described: (1) an active form, where both the dominant and the parasystolic pacemakers are located within the sinus node and (2) a passive form, where the basic rhythm is ectopic and the sinus pacemaker is protected as a result of complete retrograde SA block. Three cases of sinus parasystole are analyzed. In the active form of the arrhythmia the parasystolic sinus P waves are identical to those of the basic sinus rhythm. The diagnosis is suggested by variably coupled premature sinus P waves occurring with mathematically related intervals. This relationship between the parasystolic intervals can not be precise whenever complicating factors such as modulation occur. The recognition of active sinus parasystole is difficult, since the parasystolic P waves do not differ from basic P waves, so that the pattern resembles that of sinus arrhythmia or sinus extrasystoles. The passive form of sinus parasystole is more easily recognized due to the clear-cut difference between the dominant ectopic atrial waves and the "parasystolic" sinus P waves, which manifest with variable coupling intervals and reflect mathematically related intervals in between.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/20. Surgical resection of cor triatriatum in a 74-year-old man. review of echocardiographic findings with emphasis on Doppler and transesophageal echocardiography.

    A 74-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with congestive heart failure secondary to cor triatriatum. He also had sick sinus syndrome with complete heart block and syncope that had been treated with a permanent pacemaker 20 years earlier. The patient underwent successful surgical resection of the atrial membrane with closure of an atrial septal defect. M-mode, two-dimensional, Doppler, and transesophageal echocardiographic findings are reviewed. A unique "spike and dome" pattern on continuous-wave Doppler echocardiography is described that may suggest diagnosis of cor triatriatum.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/20. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy performed on woman with a cardiac pacemaker.

    A 73-year-old woman with a sick sinus syndrome and a 3-year-old ventricular demand pacemaker underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy without incident. There was no damage or malfunction of the pacemaker during or acutely after this therapy. The lithotriptor had no difficulty in sensing all paced or spontaneous ventricular complexes.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/20. Atrial tachycardia, 2:1 alternate Wenckebach periodicity, and atrial standstill.

    A case of atrial tachycardia, 2:1 alternate Wenckebach periodicity and atrial standstill is reported in an 80-year-old woman who complained of exertional dyspnea and occasional syncope for two years. Two blocked P' waves appeared after each Wenckebach period suggesting type B alternating Wenckebach phenomenon (Mobitz type II 2:1 A-V block distal, and Wenckebach conduction proximal).
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Sick Sinus Syndrome'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.