Cases reported "Sickle Cell Trait"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/6. Transcorneal oxygen therapy for glaucoma associated with sickle cell hyphema.

    PURPOSE: To study three patients with glaucoma caused by sickle cell hyphema who were successfully treated with transcorneal oxygen therapy. methods: case reports. Three patients with increased intraocular pressure caused by sickle cell hyphema were administered transcorneal oxygen therapy using humidified oxygen at a flow rate that ranged from 1 to 3 l/minute. RESULTS: All three patients had a dramatic reduction in their intraocular pressure within hours of receiving oxygen therapy. No complications were associated with the oxygen therapy. CONCLUSION: Transcorneal oxygen therapy can reduce intraocular pressure in patients with glaucoma from sickle cell hyphema. Further study is warranted to evaluate this new therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/6. An unusual case of uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema (UGH) syndrome in which anterior chamber paracentesis led to the diagnosis of sickle cell trait. DESIGN: Observational case report. methods: A 43-year-old Cuban pseudophakic male was seen multiple times over a 3-year period complaining of floaters and blurry vision in his left eye. He was noted to have an inferotemporally displaced posterior chamber intraocular lens and recurrent microhyphemas with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) readings between 29 and 46 mm Hg with each episode. He was diagnosed with UGH syndrome. Posterior chamber intraocular lens explantation and anterior chamber washout was performed. The aqueous fluid was submitted for cytopathologic examination. RESULTS: Postoperatively, the patient's symptoms resolved and he had no further hemorrhages or elevated IOP readings. Cytopathology of the aspirate revealed sickled red blood cells. CONCLUSIONS: Microscopic examination of aqueous fluid can be a valuable tool in diagnosing ophthalmic manifestations of systemic disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = hyphema
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/6. Sickle cell hyphema with secondary glaucoma in a non-black patient.

    A 5-year-old Mexican-American boy developed marked elevation of intraocular pressure in association with a small traumatic hyphema. Laboratory studies prompted by this clinical presentation revealed that the child had sickle trait. Pressure returned to normal after surgical evacuation of blood from the anterior chamber. Sickle cell hemoglobinopathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of secondary glaucoma following blunt ocular trauma even in non-black patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = hyphema
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/6. Reversal of retinal and optic disc ischemia in a patient with sickle cell trait and glaucoma secondary to traumatic hyphema.

    A 14-year-old black boy with sickle cell trait, who sustained a traumatic hyphema, developed moderately elevated intraocular pressure that failed to respond to carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and osmotic agents. On the tenth postinjury day, a sudden increased cupping of the optic disc and partial central retinal artery obstruction caused painless loss of vision. Reversal of the cupping, the retinal ischemia, and the intraocular pressure was documented following anterior chamber paracentesis, and visual acuity returned to 6/6. Pathophysiology of the posterior ischemia is discussed. This case documents the potentially debilitating course of traumatic hyphema in "benign" sickle cell trait and its avoidance with proper management. The authors endorse recent suggestions for careful observation of any sickle cell patient with traumatic hyphema, and recommend anterior chamber paracentesis, supplemental oxygen, and avoidance of osmotic agents, if secondary glaucoma develops following the initial trauma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/6. The diagnosis and treatment of sickled erythrocytes in human hyphemas.

    Four patients with sickle cell hemoglobinopathies (one SC; three AS) and hyphemas were found to have more erythrocytes sickled in their anterior chambers than in their circulating venous blood. intraocular pressure was severely elevated, despite relatively small amounts of intracameral blood. Systemic hypotensive agents were not always successful in reducing IOP, and in patients with sickle cell hemoglobinopathy, are probably contraindicated in high or repeated dose regimens. Moderate elevation of IOP in sickle cell hemoglobinopathy patients may produce rapid deterioration of visual function, perhaps because of a greater effect on vascular perfusion in the CRA and optic nerve. Early anterior chamber paracentesis may be the best treatment for this type of hyphema-induced secondary glaucoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = hyphema
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/6. Unrecognized microscopic hyphema masquerading as a closed head injury.

    OBJECTIVE: To present a child with an unrecognized microscopic traumatic hyphema and acute glaucoma who was initially treated as a closed head injury patient. DESIGN: Case report and discussion. RESULTS: Symptoms attributable to unrecognized occult ocular injury in a child with sickle cell trait resulted in evaluation and treatment of the child for a closed head injury. Evaluation included a computed tomography scan of the head and lumbar puncture. An ophthalmologic consultation later revealed a microscopic hyphema and acute glaucoma as the etiology of the child's signs and symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Children who present with neurologic symptoms and a history of ocular trauma should undergo an ophthalmologic examination as soon as possible. hyphema, even if not readily visible on physical examination, can result in the development of acute glaucoma with signs and symptoms that resemble a closed head injury.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = hyphema
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Sickle Cell Trait'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.