Cases reported "Silicosis"

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1/42. Accelerated silicosis with mixed-dust pneumoconiosis in a hard-metal grinder.

    We describe a fatal case of accelerated silicosis with a component of mixed-dust pneumoconiosis in a young hard-metal grinder that we believe is the first case of its kind in israel and one of the rare cases reported worldwide. The patient's diagnosis was based on typical features: restrictive lung function, abnormal chest roentgenogram suggesting lung fibrosis, a history of exposure to silica and hard metals, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings, and mineralogical studies. BAL cells showed an abundance of giant multinucleated macrophages. The CD4/CD8 ratio of T lymphocytes was 1.1, with a high percentage of CD8 and CD8/38 positive cells (37% suppressor/cytotoxic and 12% cytotoxic T lymphocytes, respectively). mRNA transcripts isolated from BAL cells were positive for interleukin-1 (IL-1) and transforming growth factor (TGF) Il-5, IL-2, and IL-10 but not for IL-6, IL-4, and interferon. Polarizing light microscopic studies of BAL and induced sputum cells showed polarizing particles, which are typical for silica. Mineralogical studies of electron microscopy performed on BAL fluid and on dust collected at the patient's workstation revealed silica particles as well as aluminum-titanium and other particles. The latter might have contributed to the patient's lung disease.
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2/42. kidney disease and silicosis.

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of kidney disease in a cohort of individuals with silicosis. methods: review of medical records and questionnaires from patients reported to a state surveillance system for silicosis. Reporting of individuals with silicosis is required by state law. All individuals with silicosis reported as required by law to the State of michigan. Individuals included in this article were reported from 1987 to 1995. Cases were reported by hospitals, physicians, the state workers' compensation bureau, or from death certificates. Only individuals who met the criteria for silicosis developed by the National Institute for Occupational safety and health (NIOSH) were included. RESULTS: medical records were reviewed of 583 individuals with confirmed silicosis. This was mainly a population of elderly men. Ten percent of the 583 silicotics were found to have some mention of chronic kidney disease, and 33% of the 283 silicotics who we had laboratory tests on had a serum creatinine level >1.5 mg/dl. An association between kidney disease and age and between kidney disease and race was found among this cohort of 583 silicotics. Individuals with silicosis were more likely to have a serum creatinine level >1.5 mg/dl than age- and race-matched controls. However, no relationship between duration of exposure to silica or profusion of scarring on chest X-ray and prevalence of kidney disease or elevated creatinine levels was found. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms previous case reports and epidemiologic studies of end-stage renal disease that found an association between kidney disease and exposure to silica. The epidemiologic data are conflicting on the mechanism by which silica causes kidney disease and are compatible with silica being able to cause kidney disease by both an autoimmune and direct nephrotoxic effect. Chronic kidney disease should be considered as a complication of silicosis.
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3/42. Hypothenar hammer syndrome followed by systemic sclerosis.

    We describe the first case of bilateral hypothenar hammer syndrome (HHS) followed by systemic sclerosis (SSc) that was associated with silica exposure (Erasmus syndrome). The patient was a woman smoothing tiles in an earthenware factory who presented with bilateral digital ischemia associated with Raynaud's phenomenon. HHS was diagnosed, based on an angiographic study showing aneurysm of the ulnar arteries and occlusions of multiple digital arteries. Pulmonary silicosis was also diagnosed on pulmonary tomodensitometry. Two years later digital swelling with acroosteolysis developed. The FANA test was positive (titer 1:640) and anticentromere antibody tests were also positive. Esophageal manometry showed dysmotility of the lower esophagus. These findings were consistent with a diagnosis of SSc.
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4/42. Right middle lobe atelectasis associated with endobronchial silicotic lesions.

    BACKGROUND: In a period of 18 months, we have encountered 4 cases of right middle lobe atelectasis associated with endobronchial silicotic lesions of right middle lobe bronchi. All patients had occupational exposure to mineral dusts (3 coal miners and 1 sand blaster) for months to decades. methods: The nature of the endobronchial silicotic lesions that caused the bronchial obstruction has been confirmed by endobronchial biopsies and energy-dispersive spectrometry of the lesions. Extrinsic compression has been excluded by careful radiographic and computed tomographic image analysis. RESULTS: The endobronchial silicosis does not appear to correlate with the degree of pneumoconiosis of the lung parenchyma. The endobronchial silicosis may cause bronchial obstruction in the absence of radiographic evidence of pulmonary silicosis. CONCLUSION: The endobronchial silicosis and consequent lung atelectasis may be associated with silica exposure.
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ranking = 172.24302370096
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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5/42. Discoid lupus erythematosus developing in areas where fragments of windshield glass had become embedded in the skin.

    We observed a 26-year-old female patient with discoid lupus erythematosus on her left cheek skin, where fine fragments of windshield glass had been embedded in an automobile accident 8 years previously. She gradually developed general fatigue, morning stiffness of fingers and anti-nuclear antibody. As an etio-pathogenesis of this patient, we speculate that a long exposure to quartz (silica) could give rise to discoid lupus erythematosus in only local damaged areas and at the same time induce systemic immunological changes in some genetically restricted persons; such as production of anti-nuclear antibody. Silica has multi-potential biological effects, especially on immunological functions.
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6/42. Pulmonary silicosis and systemic lupus erythematosus in men: a report of two cases.

    We reporttwo cases of coexistence of pulmonary silicosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patients are two men with SLE exposed to silica for 20 years. The hypothesis that silica exposure is linked to a wide variety of known or suspected autoimmune diseases, including SLE, has been discussed in the last decade but few cases of pulmonary silicosis and SLE were reported. Our purpose was to bring attention to the increasing evidence that silica may also cause or stimulate SLE, and to suggest that the researchers look for occupational exposure, mainly in male SLE patients.
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ranking = 172.24302370096
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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7/42. Treatment of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax complicating silicosis and progressive massive fibrosis.

    To clarify the management and treatment for the refractory cases of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP), we analyzed the clinical features in SSP complicating three cases of advanced silicosis, and discussed the available treatment. All three cases were males of age ranging from 60 to 70 years, and had silicosis with massive progressive fibrosis (PMF), classified as type 4 (PR4) according to the ILO guidelines. There was no correlation between the onset of SSP and the smoking habit, or the duration of the occupational exposure to silica. In a total of ten episodes of SSP, a refractory episode occurred in each of the three patients. No surgical treatment was possible because of some complications. Therefore, we administered conservative treatments under mechanical ventilation. The conservative treatments used were tube drainage with suction in each episode and pleurodesis by the combination of minocycline and OK-432 in one case. Approximately one month was the average time required for the air leak cessation. A significant decline in arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) was observed after the treatment of one case, suggesting further respiratory deterioration. These results imply that the more aggressive treatments for refractory SSP should be limited because of the patient status and progression. More information might be required before performing these options safely and effectively.
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ranking = 171.24302370096
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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8/42. gardening in greenhouses as a risk factor for silicosis.

    silicosis is a typical occupational disease, although some cases caused by non-industrial exposure have also been reported. We saw a 53-year-old male gardener with recurrent non-productive cough. A routine radiograph of the chest showed bilateral pulmonary nodules and subsequent computed tomography suggested that the infiltrates could be metastases. Open lung biopsy revealed nodules consisting of fibrotic tissue while the presence of birefringent silica particles was observed by polarised light microscopy. Mineralogical analysis of the substrata from the patient's workplace revealed an SiO(2) concentration of 31%. This case indicates that the inhalation of siliceous particles in a closed environment such as a greenhouse is a risk factor for silicosis.
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keywords = exposure
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9/42. Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the lung in a patient with silicosis.

    silicosis is an important form of pneumoconiosis, which is caused by significant exposure to crystalline silica. The carcinogenicity of silica, despite traditional beliefs, in relation to lung cancer has been controversial. Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the lung, an Epstein-Barr virus-associated undifferentiated carcinoma, is a rare entity of pulmonary malignancy, which tends to affect young nonsmoking Asians. The first case of silicosis, initially complicated by pulmonary tuberculosis, which later developed into advanced lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the lung is reported. A combination of 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin and calcium folinate resulted in partial tumour response.
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10/42. Silica and trichloroethylene-induced progressive systemic sclerosis.

    Several environmental factors and chemicals have been described as being able to induce systemic scleroderma and scleroderma-like diseases. The present work reports 2 male patients with progressive systemic sclerosis and pulmonary silicosis. Both patients had occupational histories of exposure to silica and one of them of handling trichloroethylene as a degreasing agent. The clinical and analytical findings could not be distinguished from those present in idiopathic systemic scleroderma with the exception of interstitial images with calcified hilar lymph nodes in the chest X-ray suggestive of pulmonary silicosis.
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