Cases reported "Sinoatrial Block"

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1/2. Apparent bradycardia-dependent sinoatrial block associated with respiration.

    In our previous patients, apparent bradycardia-dependent block has been shown in the atrioventricular (AV) junction and in the accessory pathway. It was suggested that these previous cases were not of true bradycardia-dependent block; namely, that, as a result of periodic increases in vagal tone associated with respiration, conductivity in the AV junction or in the accessory pathway was depressed to a greater degree than automaticity in the sinus node. In the present article, 3 patients with frequent sinoatrial (SA) block were reported. In 1 patient, sinus escape-capture bigeminy caused by SA block was found. In these present patients, when the sinus cycle lengthened, SA block occurred. The purpose of the present article is to show that the patients have apparent bradycardia-dependent SA block, namely, not true bradycardia-dependent SA block. In all patients, the respiration curve was recorded simultaneously with the electrocardiogram. In all patients, during inspiration, the sinus cycle gradually shortened; on the other hand, during expiration, the sinus cycle gradually lengthened, and then a sinus impulse was blocked in the SA junction. These findings suggested that increased vagal tone during expiration depressed conductivity in the SA junction to a greater degree than automaticity in the sinus node.
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2/2. Mechanism of atrial escape-capture bigeminy: second-degree sinoatrial exit and entrance block.

    Two women with atrial escape-capture bigeminy were reported in whom sinus P waves and escape P waves alternated with each other. Their electrocardiographic findings showed that, during the bigeminal rhythm, 2:1 exit block of sinus impulses associated with entrance block of escape impulses occurred in the sinoatrial junction. Three phenomena are suggested to explain the observations. (1) Seeming bradycardia-dependent sinoatrial exit block may have occurred, probably as a result of phasic changes in vagal tone due to respiration, with decreased vagal tone depressing conductivity in the sinoatrial junction to a greater degree than automaticity in the sinus node. (2) In case 1, type II second-degree entrance block in the sinoatrial junction may have occurred, reflecting the presence of sinus parasystole with incomplete entrance block. (3) Sinus escape also may have occurred, especially in case 2. These phenomena have never been reported before.
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keywords = respiration
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