Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/175. Endovascular recanalization with balloon angioplasty and stenting of an occluded occipital sinus for treatment of intracranial venous hypertension: technical case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Dural sinus thrombosis can lead to intracranial venous hypertension and can be complicated by intracranial hemorrhage. We present a case report of a patient who underwent endovascular recanalization and stenting of a thrombosed occipital sinus. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 13-year-old patient with a history of chronic sinus thrombosis refractory to anticoagulant therapy presented with acute onset of aphasia and hemiparesis. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hydrocephalus and cerebral edema. angiography delineated multiple dural arteriovenous fistulae and persistent occlusion of the posterior sagittal, occipital, and bilateral transverse dural sinuses with retrograde cortical venous drainage. INTERVENTION: After embolization of the dural arteriovenous fistulae, a transvenous approach was used to recanalize and perform balloon angioplasty of the right internal jugular vein and the occipital and left transverse sinuses, resulting in subsequent clinical improvement. The patient's condition deteriorated 3 days later with reocclusion of both balloon-dilated sinuses. Repeat angioplasty and then deployment of an endovascular stent in the occipital sinus were performed, and reestablishment of venous outflow was achieved, resulting in a decrease of intracranial venous pressure from 41 to 14 mm Hg and neurological improvement. At the 3-month follow-up examination, the stented occipital sinus remained patent and served as the only conduit for extracranial venous outflow; the patient remained neurologically intact at the 12-month follow-up examination. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of mechanical recanalization, balloon angioplasty, and stent deployment in the occipital sinus to provide sustained venous outflow for the treatment of venous hypertension with retrograde cortical venous drainage in a patient with dural pansinus thrombosis refractory to anticoagulant therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/175. Severe cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and dural arteriovenous fistula in an infant with protein s deficiency.

    A 12-month-old infant presented with cerebral seizures and neurological deficits. MRI scan of the brain and angiography showed massive cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicated by a dural arteriovenous fistula. Subsequent clotting analysis revealed a protein s deficiency. Screening for inherited coagulation inhibitor deficiency is recommended in children with unexplained or atypical thrombotic events.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/175. Application of a rheolytic thrombectomy device in the treatment of dural sinus thrombosis: a new technique.

    We present a novel application of a transvascular rheolytic thrombectomy system in the treatment of symptomatic dural sinus thrombosis in a 54-year-old woman with somnolence and left-sided weakness. The diagnosis of bilateral transverse and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis was made and the patient was treated with anticoagulant therapy. After an initial period of improvement, she became comatose and hemiplegic 8 days after presentation. After excluding intracerebral hemorrhage by MR imaging, we performed angiography and transfemoral venous thrombolysis with a hydrodynamic thrombectomy catheter, followed by intrasinus urokinase thrombolytic therapy over the course of 2 days. This technique resulted in dramatic sinus thrombolysis and near total neurologic recovery. Six months after treatment, the patient showed mild cognitive impairment and no focal neurologic deficit. Our preliminary experience suggests that this technique may play a significant role in the endovascular treatment of this potentially devastating disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/175. prothrombin gene variant (G20210A) in a patient with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    We describe a 33-year-old woman, who presented with lowered consciousness level and seizures, due to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with venous haemorrhagic infarcts. The patient. who was taking oral contraceptives, appeared to be heterozygous for a prothrombin gene variant, which is due to a G-->A transition at position 20210. This 20210A prothrombin has recently been established as an important risk factor for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, which interacts with oral contraceptive use.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/175. Endovascular thrombolysis for symptomatic cerebral venous thrombosis.

    OBJECT: The authors sought to treat potentially catastrophic intracranial dural and deep cerebral venous thrombosis by using a multimodality endovascular approach. methods: Six patients aged 14 to 75 years presented with progressive symptoms of thrombotic intracranial venous occlusion. Five presented with neurological deficits, and one patient had a progressive and intractable headache. All six had known risk factors for venous thrombosis: inflammatory bowel disease (two patients), nephrotic syndrome (one), cancer (one), use of oral contraceptive pills (one), and puerperium (one). Four had combined dural and deep venous thrombosis, whereas clot formation was limited to the dural venous sinuses in two patients. All patients underwent diagnostic cerebral arteriograms followed by transvenous catheterization and selective sinus and deep venous microcatheterization. Urokinase was delivered at the proximal aspect of the thrombus in dosages of 200,000 to 1,000,000 IU. In two patients with thrombus refractory to pharmacological thrombolytic treatment, mechanical wire microsnare maceration of the thrombus resulted in sinus patency. Radiological studies obtained 24 hours after thrombolysis reconfirmed sinus/vein patency in all patients. All patients' symptoms and neurological deficits improved, and no procedural complications ensued. Follow-up periods ranged from 12 to 35 months, and all six patients remain free of any symptomatic venous reocclusion. Factors including patients' age, preexisting medical conditions, and duration of symptoms had no statistical bearing on the outcome. CONCLUSIONS: patients with both dural and deep cerebral venous thrombosis often have a variable clinical course and an unpredictable neurological outcome. With recent improvements in interventional techniques, endovascular therapy is warranted in symptomatic patients early in the disease course, prior to morbid and potentially fatal neurological deterioration.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/175. sagittal sinus thrombosis associated with thrombocytopenia: a report of two patients.

    Reported are two patients presenting with both thrombocytopenia and sagittal sinus thrombosis. The first patient is a 42-month-old male with no identified thrombophilic risk factors who developed acute neurologic symptoms after an acute infection. The second patient is a 22-month-old female with no history of preceding infection but had a positive lupus anticoagulant test. She also developed deep venous thrombosis and was treated with intravenous heparin. Both patients are currently doing well without neurologic deficits. To the authors' knowledge the second patient is the youngest reported patient with cerebral vein thrombosis associated with thrombocytopenia and lupus anticoagulant. These observations call attention to the need for a thorough investigation of thrombophilic risk factors in pediatric patients with thrombotic complications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/175. Emergent decompressive craniectomy in patients with fixed dilated pupils due to cerebral venous and dural sinus thrombosis: report of three cases.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Cerebral venous and dural sinus thrombosis is a rare cause of stroke. Although morbidity and mortality have greatly decreased in recent years as a result of early diagnosis and timely medical treatment, when coma occurs the prognosis remains poor. We evaluated whether emergent decompressive craniectomy has a role in the treatment of patients with brain herniation from dural sinus thrombosis and hemorrhagic infarct. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: Three patients developed large hemorrhagic infarct with coma and bilaterally fixed and dilated pupils resulting from aseptic dural sinus thrombosis. INTERVENTION: Two patients underwent emergent surgical decompression as soon as brain herniation developed, and these patients had complete functional recovery. One underwent delayed surgical decompression and remained severely disabled. CONCLUSION: Our results provide preliminary evidence that emergent decompressive craniectomy is effective in patients with brain herniation from dural sinus thrombosis, provided that the clinical onset is recent. We therefore recommend consideration of this aggressive surgical technique for such patients, who may survive with good outcomes.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/175. Power Doppler ultrasound imaging in neonatal cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    Neonatal sinus thrombosis is a rare occurrence in sick neonates. Because of its nonspecific manifestations, the incidence is underestimated. This disease may not be demonstrated by conventional color Doppler and is diagnosed by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The authors report a neonate with neonatal sinus thrombosis diagnosed by power Doppler and suggest that the technique may be used as a less expensive and more available screening and follow-up method in high-risk neonates.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/175. Dural sinus occlusion in leukemia.

    The case of a 7-year-old child with acute lymphocytic leukemia who, while in relapse, developed a superior sagittal sinus thrombosis is documented by angiography and post-mortem examination. review of the literature suggests that cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis which usually accompanies the arachnoid infiltration of central nervous system (CNS) leukemia may be absent in some patients as in this case. In the absence of CSF pleocytosis, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may mimic the other signs and symptoms of CNS leukemia and consequently may be a more frequent complication of acute leukemia than is presently appreciated. Therapy directed to the CSF axis generally would not under these circumstances be appropriate.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/175. Extrinsic cerebral venous sinus obstruction resulting in intracranial hypertension.

    We report the case of a 70-year-old man reporting with headache and visual disturbances who was being treated for prostate cancer. Investigations showed him to have intracranial hypertension caused by venous sinus obstruction. patients with metastatic disease and raised intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs should be considered as possible cases of venous outflow obstruction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.