Cases reported "Skin Diseases, Bacterial"

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1/32. Pseudogaucher cells in cutaneous Mycobacterium avium intracellulare infection: report of a case.

    We report on a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and with cutaneous Mycobacterium avium intracellulare, in whom many cells with abundant reticulated cytoplasm resembling the characteristic cells of Gauchers disease ("pseudogaucher cells") were noted within the dermal infiltrate on biopsy. Although pseudogaucher cells have been reported in association with M. avium intracellulare infection in extracutaneous sites, this is, to our knowledge, the first report of cutaneous pseudogaucher cells in the skin.
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ranking = 1
keywords = intracellulare, avium
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2/32. Atypical mycobacterium infection with dermatological manifestation in a renal transplant recipient.

    In April 1997, a 58-year-old renal transplant recipient presented with abscess-like nodules in his left calf and on his right foot. Furuncular disease was suspected and the patient was treated with flucloxacillin. However, the lesions increased in size and became ulcerative. In the following 3 months, cultures of punctuated material, blood, and urine remained negative and gram stains did not reveal micro-organisms. In June 1997, acid-fast stains were positive. A diagnosis of a nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) infection was made and empirical antimycobacterial therapy was started. The combination of relatively minor symptoms with enlarged purulent lesions, causing severe morbidity, raises the possibility of NTM infection in the immunocompromised patient.
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ranking = 5.4643923310813
keywords = mycobacterium
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3/32. Familial cluster of cutaneous Mycobacterium avium infection resulting from use of a circulating, constantly heated bath water system.

    We describe familial cases of cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium avium. A 45-year-old father, his 14-year-old son and 11-year-old daughter, among five persons in a family, presented with a 2-month history of inflammatory subcutaneous nodules and ulcerations. histology of skin biopsy specimens showed granulomatous inflammation, and mycobacterial colonies isolated from the skin of each patient were identified as M. avium by dna hybridization analysis. The patients were all treated successfully with combined drug therapy consisting of rifampicin, isoniazid and clarithromycin. Their lesions were purely cutaneous M. avium infection, without any visceral involvement. Neither systemic disease nor immunological impairment was detected in the family. However, they all used a circulating, constantly heated bath water system. The bath water was continuously heated to about 40 degrees C without changing the water for a few months, and M. avium was isolated from the filter of the bath tub heating unit. It is considered that this unusual familial cluster of cutaneous M. avium infection in healthy persons may have resulted from the use of contaminated bath water.
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ranking = 0.046550417201483
keywords = avium
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4/32. Cutaneous infection caused by serratia marcescens.

    An 86-year-old woman presented with a chronic granulomatous skin lesion on the dorsal aspect of her left hand. Histologic examination showed pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia and a dense dermal infiltrate largely composed of lymphocytes and histiocytes. abscess formation and fibroblastic proliferation were also present. Use of Fite, Giemsa, and periodic acid-Schiff stains did not show specific organisms. The gram-negative bacillus serratia marcescens was the only microorganism isolated from all cultures performed. trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 960 mg every 12 hours for 20 days (orally), was given and resulted in complete disappearance of the lesion and negative culture findings. Cutaneous infection by S marcescens may represent a distinctive entity, whose clinical and possible pathogenic features are presented here.
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ranking = 0.0015415350353481
keywords = bacillus
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5/32. Clinical and pathologic features of mycobacterium fortuitum infections. An emerging pathogen in patients with AIDS.

    The clinical and pathologic features of mycobacterium fortuitum infection in 11 patients with AIDS were characterized. Nine patients had cervical lymphadenitis; 2 had disseminated infection. The infection occurred late in the course of AIDS, and the only laboratory abnormality seen in more than half of patients (7/11) was relative monocytosis. Absolute monocytosis also was seen in 4 of 11 patients. In both cytologic and histologic preparations, the inflammatory pattern was suppurative with necrosis or a mixed suppurative-granulomatous reaction. M fortuitum, a thin, branching bacillus, stained inconsistently in direct smear and histologic preparations. Staining was variable with Gram, auramine, Brown-Hopps, Gram-Weigert, Kinyoun, Ziehl-Neelsen, modified Kinyoun, and Fite stains. Organisms, when present, were always seen in areas of suppurative inflammation. Incorrect presumptive diagnosis, based on misinterpretation of clinical signs and symptoms or on erroneous identification of M fortuitum bacilli as nocardia species, led to a delay in proper therapy for 7 of 11 patients. Definitive therapy after culture identification resulted in complete resolution of infection in all patients except 1.
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ranking = 0.0015415350353481
keywords = bacillus
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6/32. Cutaneous infection with mycobacterium fortuitum after localized microinjections (mesotherapy) treated successfully with a triple drug regimen.

    mesotherapy is a treatment method devised for controlling pain syndromes or diseases by subcutaneous microinjections given at or around the involved areas at short intervals of time. Different adverse effects have been described due to this modality of treatment. This report describes 3 patients with cutaneous infection caused by mycobacterium fortuitum after mesotherapy. Three women, aged 24, 27 and 44 years, presented with similar clinical features, consisting of painful nodules located at the points where mesotherapy had been applied. A smear from a skin biopsy revealed the presence of acid-fast bacilli in all 3 cases. The specimen was cultured and eventually identified as M. fortuitum. A multidrug long-term regimen (combinations of 3 drugs from the following: ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, clarithromycin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid) was needed to achieve resolution of the lesions. After 15, 25 and 26 months of follow-up, no patient relapsed. mycobacterium fortuitum is a rapidly growing mycobacterium that can lead to cutaneous infection after minor surgical procedures when aseptic measures are not adequate. Multiple drugs for several months are usually needed to treat this disease successfully.
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ranking = 1.0928784662163
keywords = mycobacterium
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7/32. levofloxacin alone efficiently treated a cutaneous mycobacterium fortuitum infection.

    Cutaneous infections with Mycobacterium (M.) fortuitum are rare, and some cases resist treatment. We report two cases of cutaneous M. fortuitum infection successfully treated with levofloxacin alone.
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ranking = 4.371513864865
keywords = mycobacterium
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8/32. Sporotrichoid cutaneous mycobacterium avium complex infection.

    mycobacterium avium complex, a common opportunistic pathogen among patients with AIDS, usually manifests as disseminated disease involving the lung, lymph nodes, and gastrointestinal tract. Primary cutaneous infections with M avium complex are extremely rare, and most cutaneous lesions are caused by dissemination. Cutaneous manifestations thus far reported include scaling plaques, crusted ulcers, ecthyma-like lesions, verrucous ulcers, inflammatory nodules, panniculitis, pustular lesions, and draining sinuses. Localized skin involvement resembling sporotrichosis is unusual and to our knowledge has been reported only once in the English-language literature. We describe an additional case of primary cutaneous M avium complex infection manifesting as sporotrichosis-like lesions on a patient with AIDS.
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ranking = 0.14668045952843
keywords = avium complex, avium, complex
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9/32. Localization of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare within a skin lesion of bacillary angiomatosis in a patient with AIDS.

    We report a 39-year-old man who had AIDS and who presented with an unusual cutaneous vascular lesion, which was clinically thought to be Kaposi's sarcoma. Histologically, the lesion was characterized by capillary proliferation and a mixed inflammatory infiltrate that included numerous histiocytes. The lesion was found to contain slender intracellular acid-fast bacilli, as well as plump extracellular Warthin-Starry-positive bacilli. The acid-fast bacilli were confirmed to be Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare by subsequent positive blood cultures for this organism. To further investigate the lesion, polymerase chain reaction dna amplification and sequencing was performed, and the lesion was found to contain dna sequences identical to those previously established for the agent of bacillary angiomatosis. The lesion is thought to represent a lesion of bacillary angiomatosis with secondary involvement by M. avium-intracellulare.
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ranking = 1
keywords = intracellulare, avium
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10/32. Cutaneous infection caused by salmonella typhi.

    salmonella typhi is a flagellated, gram-negative bacillus belonging to the family enterobacteriaceae responsible for typhoid fever, which is a prolonged bacteraemic, systemic illness with minimal, at least initially, diarrhoea. Localized infection is a not uncommon complication of salmonella septicaemia, particularly occurring in immunocompromised patients. However, salmonella localization to the skin presenting as cutaneous ulceration is regarded as a rare event. We report a unique case of such a presentation as the sole clinical manifestation of infection with S. typhi and highlight the possible salmonella aetiology for unusual cutaneous lesions in individuals coming from endemic areas.
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ranking = 0.0015415350353481
keywords = bacillus
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