Cases reported "Skin Diseases, Infectious"

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1/9. parapoxvirus infections acquired after exposure to wildlife.

    The histopathologic and electron microscopic findings in two patients with skin lesions that developed after exposure to deer and other wildlife were consistent with a parapoxviral infection. Human infections that were morphologically similar to parapoxvirus infection have been previously described concerning exposure to cervids (deer and related animals). Ours are the first reported cases in which viral particles were demonstrated by electron microscopy.
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2/9. Group C streptococcal bacteremia: analysis of 88 cases.

    Eighty-eight cases of group C streptococcal bacteremia were reviewed retrospectively. Most patients had underlying diseases (72.7%), predominantly cardiovascular disease (20.5%) or malignancy (20.5%). The infection originated most often from the upper respiratory tract (20.5%), the gastrointestinal tract (18.2%), or the skin (17.1%). Prior exposure to animals or animal products was reported in 23.9% of cases. The most common clinical manifestations of group C streptococcal bacteremia were endocarditis (27.3%), primary bacteremia (22.7%), and meningitis (10.2%). Of streptococcal isolates, 61.4% were not speciated, 19.3% were Streptococcus equisimilis, 17.1% were Streptococcus zooepidemicus, and two (2.3%) were streptococcus equi. The isolates were sensitive to most antibiotics, and most patients were treated with beta-lactam agents. mortality was high (25.0%), especially among older patients and patients with endocarditis, meningitis, and disseminated infection. Group C streptococcal bacteremia does not differ from bloodstream infection caused by other beta-hemolytic streptococci with regard to clinical presentation, treatment, or outcome.
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keywords = animal
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3/9. Cutaneous anthrax.

    In this report we present two children with cutaneous anthrax which is rarely seen in developing countries. There is usually a history of contact with animals. One of our patients did not have such a contact.
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4/9. Pitted keratolysis: a manifestation of human dermatophilosis.

    A case of pitted keratolysis caused by Dermatophilus congolensis is reported. The organism was isolated from the lesion and identified by its morphological, cultural, and biochemical characteristics. A survey of the literature revealed that it rarely causes human infections, but is a common causative agent of disease in domesticated and wild animals. Human infections reported previously were traced to contact with infected animals or contaminated soil. We report pitted keratolysis in a 44-year-old physician with no known history of such a contact.
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5/9. An outbreak of skin infections caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci probably originating from wild moose.

    An outbreak of about 20 recorded cases of impetiginous skin infections occurred during the moose (Alces alces) hunting season in October and November 1976 in persons having been in contact with moose from Hailuoto Island, Northern finland. Samples for bacteriological studies werre obtained from 4 patients, and beta-hemolytic streptococci group A were isolated from all. The strains were biochemically identical. Epidemiological data strongly support a moose origin of the streptococci, even though none were isolated from the animals.
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6/9. Orf. A case report with histologic, electron microscopic, and immunoperoxidase studies.

    Orf is an occupational skin disease acquired through contact with infected animals. In humans, orf is usually a self-limited disease that resolves spontaneously within four to 24 weeks. We report a case with multiple lesions of orf, acquired by contact with a wild sheep. The patient was temporarily immunosuppressed by a concomitant viral hepatitis. We reviewed the histologic and electron microscopic findings. Also, we attempted to stain the parapoxvirus in the skin of the patient, using the immunoperoxidase technique. The antiserum was obtained from sheep immunized against orf. We used lesional skin from sheep infected with orf as a positive control. The negative results of this technique in the patient's skin indicated that parapoxvirus infecting wild sheep is antigenically different from that causing the disease in domestic animals.
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7/9. Farmyard pox: parapox virus infection in man.

    Inasmuch as orf, milker's nodules and bovine papular stomatitis pox are clinically identical in man and are induced by currently indistinguishable parapox viruses, we propose a new generic term 'farmyard pox' for these diseases. This affords the clinician a diagnosis based on a common set of clinical and electron microscopic findings rather than one based on an uncertain or even misleading history. A case in point is reported in which the history failed to reveal a specific animal source of the virus, but electron microscopy confirmed the presence of parapox infection.
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8/9. Protothecosis.

    We have reported the 22nd case in the literature of protothecosis, a rare disease of man and animals due to infection with non-chlorophyll-producing algae of the genus prototheca. The skin is most often affected, but generalized, disseminated involvement has been reported. infection is usually severe and may be fatal. amphotericin b in combination with tetracycline is the treatment of choice.
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9/9. Human infection with Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Dermatophilosis is a skin disease in animals and humans caused by the actinomycete Dermatophilus congolensis. This microorganism causes the skin disease in sheep commonly referred to in Australia as "lumpy wool" or mycotic dermatitis. One proven case of human dermatophilosis and two cases with features which are clinically highly suggestive of the disease from south australia are described. There has been only one previous report of human infection caused by D. congolensis, which was from the united states in 1961. A brief account of the history, characteristics and life cycle of D. congolensis is given. Human infection in Australia may be not uncommon. A diagnosis can be made by direct microscopy of scab material from the lesions. For this purpose, dry scabs should be sent to the laboratory.
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