Cases reported "Skin Diseases, Infectious"

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1/32. Pustular psoriasis elicited by streptococcal antigen and localized to the sweat pore.

    A woman, aged 39 years, presented with a localized, painful, pustular eruption of the neck, scalp, and finger of five years' duration. A diagnosis of pustular psoriasis was made clinically and histologically. It was possible to reproduce the disease by the intradermal injection of killed Group A streptococcal organisms. The induced pustules, as well as those appearing clinically, were intraepidermal and indistinguishable from the Kogoj spongiform abscess, and on serial sectioning showed a distinctive localization to the acryosyringium. Immunosuppressant as well as antistreptococcal therapy in the form of cyclophosphamide and clindamycin was of help. The process is classified as a nonvasculitic pustular bacterid, and as a prototype for antigen localization of lesions to the occluded epidermal sweat duct unit.
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2/32. Acute abdominal pain preceding cutaneous manifestations of varicella zoster infection after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    The current communication describes clinical findings in two recipients of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with varicella zoster virus infection who complained of acute severe abdominal pain preceding cutaneous manifestations. physical examination, laboratory data and gastroscopic findings were nonspecific. In these cases, acyclovir was very effective for the symptoms. Varicella zoster virus infection should be suspected in BMT recipients who have rebellant acute abdominal pain but no characteristic skin eruptions.
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3/32. Nursery outbreak of scalded-skin syndrome. Scarlatiniform rash due to phage group I staphylococcus aureus.

    From Aug 6 to 14, 1973, scariatiniform eruptions that were considered to be mild forms of the staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome developed in four neonates. One infant had mild epidermal peeling. All had generalized, finely papular erythema that cleared rapidly after treatment with antibiotics. Cultures from the umbilical stumps or anterior nares of three of the infants yielded colonies of group I staphylococcus aureus, phage type 29/52/79/86/D11/81, that were able to produce epidermal exfoliation in suckling mice. These data indicate that the nursery outbreak was caused by phage group I staphylococci rather than group II organisms previously associated with staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome. The demonstration that a group I Staphylococcus can produce exfoliative toxin suggests that the same mechanism for toxin production may exist for phage groups I and II staphylococci.
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4/32. Acropustulosis of infancy.

    Acropustulosis of infancy (Al) is a syndrome consisting of pruritic pustules that are found primarily on the extremities of infants. It is uncommon, but not rare, and persists about two years. In two infants in whom Al began at birth, there was a striking response to sulfones. There was no response to other therapy. Laboratory findings are not diagnostic for Al. Similar histopathologic changes (subcorneal pustules) can be found in other eruptions of infancy.
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5/32. granuloma annulare and disseminated herpes zoster.

    A 71-year-old man was admitted to the Wake Forest University/Baptist Hospital Medical Center on February 1, 1989, with pharyngitis and a cutaneous eruption that began that day. The past history was significant for a diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) made in 1984, and for longstanding hypertension, severe coronary artery disease, and prostatic hypertrophy. The patient had required no therapy for his CLL until August, 1988, when he developed hemolytic anemia and was treated with oral chlorambucil, 4 mg/day, and a tapering course of prednisone. By December, 1988, the prednisone therapy had been discontinued, but the patient required hospital admission for pneumococcal pneumonia, which responded well to intravenous antibiotic therapy. One day prior to the current admission the patient complained of persistent fevers, sore throat, productive cough, and headache. He noted a new cutaneous eruption on the day of admission in February, 1989. The past history was positive for occasional herpes stomatitis. The patient did not know if he had previously been infected with varicella. skin examination revealed multiple (greater than 20), single, and grouped vesicles in a generalized distribution involving the bilateral trunk, head, neck, arms, and legs. The heaviest involvement was on the right posterior auricular area and on the neck. A Tzanck preparation obtained from an early lesion was positive for multinucleated giant cells. Viral culture was negative at 24 hours and at 1 week. A skin biopsy of an early vesicular lesion was performed and revealed intraepidermal vesicles with acantholysis and giant cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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6/32. Successful treatment of disseminated cutaneous cytomegalic inclusion disease associated with Hodgkin's disease.

    A case of disseminated cutaneous cytomegalic inclusion disease associated with Hodgkin's disease is described. The patient had a diffuse eruption of pruritic, erosive erythematous nodules. Histologically, many inclusion bodies were observed in perivascular areas of the skin lesions. Immunohistologically, the inclusion bodies positively stained with both anticytomegalovirus antibody and anti-factor VIII-related antibody. On electron microscopy many virus particles and dense bodies were found in the area where inclusion bodies were observed. Treatment with high-dose intravenous acyclovir and a large amount of immunoglobulin resulted in prompt healing of the skin lesions. Subsequently, the patient's Hodgkin's disease was well controlled on chemotherapy. The patient steadily improved without relapse of skin lesions 1 year after antiviral therapy was administered.
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7/32. A papular eruption and acute abdominal pain associated with coxsackie A-14 virus.

    A 14-year-old girl who was admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain developed an erythematous papular eruption which persisted for 4 weeks. Examination of a stool specimen yielded evidence of a coxsackie A-14 virus.
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8/32. Cutaneous dissemination of herpes simplex virus in individuals fifteen years of age and older.

    We have reported the case histories of two individuals with underlying atopic dermatitis who developed extensive vesicular eruptions. In both cases herpes simplex virus type l was isolated from skin lesions and both individuals ultimately recovered. These two cases represent only the third and fourth instances of this syndrome proven to be caused by herpes simplex virus type l that have been reported in older individuals. In addition we have reviewed the literature relative to cutaneous disseminated herpes simplex virus infections occurring in individuals over the age of 15 and have presented a comprehensive overview of this disease.
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9/32. Vesicular pemphigoid.

    A patient with a pruritic vesicular eruption closely resembling dermatitis herpetiformis is described. Histopathologic examination of a biopsy specimen showed a subepidermal blister containing abundant eosinophils and neutrophils, whereas results of direct immunofluorescence studies demonstrated linear and homogeneous deposition of IgG and C3 along the basement membrane zone. prednisone therapy was necessary to control the clinical symptoms. Similar cases have been described as "vesicular pemphigoid."
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10/32. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus in epidermal skin lesions of an immunocompromised patient.

    Using in-situ hybridizaiton, we showed the presence of the Epstein-Barr (EB) virus genome in epidermal cells from a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and unusual cutaneous lesions characterized clinically by a maculopapular eruption and histologically by epidermal cell degeneration and lymphoid cell infiltration. Such histologic changes are similar to those seen in graft-versus-host disease. The EB virus genome was mainly detected in the basal, germinative cells of the abnormal epithelium. Specimens of our patient's healthy skin were negative. The presence of EB virus dna in skin lesions was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction adapted for analysis of paraffin-embedded tissue. These findings indicate that EB virus can infect the human epidermis and that the viral infection may produce a distinctive cutaneous disease.
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