Cases reported "Skin Diseases, Infectious"

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1/14. Diagnostic odyssey of a cutaneous mycobacteriosis rare in central europe.

    Cutaneous infection with mycobacterium chelonae is an uncommon disease, although this atypical mycobacterium is an acid-fast bacillus ubiquitous in the environment. It is often misdiagnosed and treated as a fungal or common bacterial infection. We report a case of disseminated atypical mycobacterial skin infection of a 72-year-old woman who was treated with different topical and systemic antimycotic and antibiotic drugs over a period of 5 months without remarkable improvement. Eventually, repeated tissue cultures on special medium and performance of PCR led to the diagnosis of M. chelonae infection. The patient was treated successfully with oral clarithromycin within 8 weeks. In case of abscessing cutaneous infection, M. chelonae should be considered in the differential diagnosis of prolonged disease when common antibiotics are not effective after 2-4 weeks of treatment.
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ranking = 1
keywords = mycobacterium, bacillus
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2/14. Lepromatous leprosy in a heart transplant recipient.

    Northern louisiana is not an area for indigenous cases of leprosy. Limited data are available on the occurrence of leprosy in organ transplant recipients. No cases have been reported in heart transplant recipients. Mr J.R. is a 68-year-old man from Shreveport, louisiana. He underwent orthotopic heart transplantation in March 1996. He presented in March 2000 with a maculopapular skin rash and intermittent hand swelling for 5 months. He also complained of intermittent burning of his feet for a year. The skin lesions were of two types - a fine red migratory, intermittent maculopapular rash over the upper torso and a raised, larger, violaceaous lesion on his hands. Neurological examination revealed complete loss of protective sensation in the right foot by filamentous test and some loss in the left foot. Punch skin biopsies from his right arm and right chest lesion revealed abundant acid-fast bacilli (AFB). Histopathologic examination revealed perivascular, interstitial and perineural granulomatous inflammation and a large number of AFB organisms within histiocytes. culture of the skin biopsy specimen was negative for mycobacterium tuberculosis or atypical mycobacterium. polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed for mycobacterium leprae was positive. The patient was treated with a modified regimen consisting of dapsone 100 mg qd, ethionamide 250 mg qd, and minocycline 100 mg qd. His skin rash and neurological symptoms have resolved.
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ranking = 0.93532705644219
keywords = mycobacterium
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3/14. Lichenoid and granulomatous dermatitis associated with atypical mycobacterium infections.

    BACKGROUND: Lichenoid and granulomatous dermatitis defines a distinctive pattern of cutaneous inflammation that may be part of the morphologic spectrum of idiopathic lichenoid reactions such as lichen planus and as well may be seen with lichenoid drug reactions, endogenous T-cell dyscrasias and as a feature of certain systemic diseases especially Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. RESULTS: We encountered three cases of lichenoid and granulomatous dermatitis in which the basis was one of primary cutaneous Mycobacterium infection. In all three cases acid fast stains revealed pathogenic organisms and as well cultures were positive for mycobacterium kansasii in one case and mycobacterium marinum in another. Other features included a prominent perineural and periadnexal lymphocytic infiltrate. CONCLUSIONS: The differential diagnosis of lichenoid and granulomatous dermatitis should also encompass primary cutaneous Mycobacterium infection in addition to the other more characteristic entities associated wtih this distinctive reaction pattern. Infection with Mycobacterium induces a TH1 dominant response which would hence produce an infiltrate.
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ranking = 3.7413082257688
keywords = mycobacterium
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4/14. rosacea-like lesions due to familial mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection.

    Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) is a non-tuberculous, nonlepromatous or "atypical" mycobacterium now seen frequently in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the past decade, the incidence appears to have increased in non-AIDS patients. Although cutaneous involvement is rare, two brothers without detectable immune defects who both presented with cutaneous MAI infection are described; the older brother also has disseminated disease. The cutaneous presentation of MAI, as well as immune and genetic defects that may predispose to mycobacterial infection, are discussed.
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ranking = 0.93532705644219
keywords = mycobacterium
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5/14. Primary cutaneous bacillus cereus infection in neutropenic children.

    A review of culture reports for a five-year period at St Jude Children's research Hospital yielded 10 cases of primary cutaneous bacillus cereus infection in neutropenic patients treated for cancer or aplastic anaemia. Vesicles or pustules were seen only on the limbs. The infections, all of which arose in the spring or summer, responded to antibiotics. In neutropenic patients B cereus should thus be regarded as a possible cause of isolated vesicles.
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ranking = 0.25869177423124
keywords = bacillus
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6/14. Sepik granuloma.

    An unusual infection occuring in the East Sepik Province of papua new guinea is reported. The patients come from villages on the Sepik River or its tributaries. The lesions consist of cutaneous nodules and papillomas which are slowly progressive. An unidentified organism, apparently a gram positive bacillus, is seen in large numbers in the lesions; a natural habitat in soil or water or on vegetation seems likely.
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ranking = 0.06467294355781
keywords = bacillus
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7/14. Fish-tank granuloma. The first reported case in south africa.

    The first case of infection with the non-tuberculous mycobacterium, mycobacterium marinum, in south africa is reported. Of special interest was the linear nodular (sporotrichoid) appearance.
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ranking = 0.93532705644219
keywords = mycobacterium
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8/14. Cutaneous Mycobacterium szulgai infection.

    Multiple inflammatory skin lesions and osteomyelitis of the right ankle developed in a 51-year-old man who had been receiving prednisone therapy for several months. Cultures of both the skin and bone lesions yielded Mycobacterium szulgai, a scotochromogenic mycobacterium, which is an unusual human pathogen. The patient's condition responded to treatment with isoniazid, ethambutol hydrochloride, and rifampin.
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ranking = 0.93532705644219
keywords = mycobacterium
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9/14. Mycobacterium szulgai--a case of cutaneous infection?

    An infant presented with a carbuncle over the angle of her jaw which grew a scotochromogenic mycobacterium, subsequently identified as Mycobacterium szulgai. The problems of identification of this organism and its possible pathogenic role are outlined.
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ranking = 0.93532705644219
keywords = mycobacterium
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10/14. Unusual mycobacteria in 5 cases of opportunistic infections.

    Five cases of infection due to an unusual mycobacterium are recorded, and the growth requirements and histological findings are discussed. On initial culture, these mycobacteria could be grown only on Lowenstein-Jensen medium containing ferric ammonium citrate, and the histology of the skin lesions was not always typical of mycobacterial disease.
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ranking = 0.93532705644219
keywords = mycobacterium
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