Cases reported "Skin Diseases, Infectious"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/5. Cutaneous (non-hiv) infections.

    Cutaneous infections continue to represent a large proportion of inpatient dermatology. Though most infectious skin diseases do not warrant hospitalization, some do and can rapidly become fatal if not treated promptly. A selected group of infections are reviewed--primary cutaneous infections, exotoxin-mediated syndromes, and systemic infections--that warrant hospitalization. Dermatologists play a critical role in the synthesis of patient history and appreciation of morphologic skin disease, which, when coupled with appropriate lab tests, may help to establish a diagnosis allowing for the timely implementation of effective and targeted therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/5. Alcohol and smoking: risk factors for infectious eczematoid dermatitis?

    risk factors for infectious eczematoid dermatitis (IED) were analyzed in a study of males aged 19-50 years. The subjects were 43 IED patients and 226 controls with other skin diseases from the dermatological outpatient clinics of three University hospitals in finland. The patients' lifestyles were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire pertaining to two specified periods: the period 12 months before the onset of the skin disease and the period 12 months before the examination date. Recalled mean alcohol intake before the onset of the skin disease was 39.2 g/day for the IED patients and 17.1 g/day for the controls (p = 0.04). The average number of cigarettes smoked daily was 17.7 for the IED patients and 10.4 for the control patients (p = 0.001). The IED patients significantly reduced their alcohol intake after the onset of the skin disease. In logistic regression analysis, IED associated with alcohol intake and smoking but not with coffee consumption, life events, age, marital status, or social group. The odds ratio for IED at an alcohol intake of 50 g/day as against no intake, was 1.7 (95% confidence interval 1.03-2.7), and the odds ratio at a tobacco consumption rate of 20 cigarettes/day as against no use of tobacco, was 2.1 (1.2-3.7). We conclude that alcohol intake and smoking appear to be risk factors for infectious eczematoid dermatitis among males.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/5. Orf. A case report with histologic, electron microscopic, and immunoperoxidase studies.

    Orf is an occupational skin disease acquired through contact with infected animals. In humans, orf is usually a self-limited disease that resolves spontaneously within four to 24 weeks. We report a case with multiple lesions of orf, acquired by contact with a wild sheep. The patient was temporarily immunosuppressed by a concomitant viral hepatitis. We reviewed the histologic and electron microscopic findings. Also, we attempted to stain the parapoxvirus in the skin of the patient, using the immunoperoxidase technique. The antiserum was obtained from sheep immunized against orf. We used lesional skin from sheep infected with orf as a positive control. The negative results of this technique in the patient's skin indicated that parapoxvirus infecting wild sheep is antigenically different from that causing the disease in domestic animals.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/5. hiv-related skin disease.

    Most patients with hiv infection will develop an hiv-related lesion of the skin or mucous membranes before their progression to AIDS. As the skin is readily observed by patients and easily examined by doctors, skin disease presents a good opportunity for the early diagnosis of hiv infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/5. Human infection with Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Dermatophilosis is a skin disease in animals and humans caused by the actinomycete Dermatophilus congolensis. This microorganism causes the skin disease in sheep commonly referred to in Australia as "lumpy wool" or mycotic dermatitis. One proven case of human dermatophilosis and two cases with features which are clinically highly suggestive of the disease from south australia are described. There has been only one previous report of human infection caused by D. congolensis, which was from the united states in 1961. A brief account of the history, characteristics and life cycle of D. congolensis is given. Human infection in Australia may be not uncommon. A diagnosis can be made by direct microscopy of scab material from the lesions. For this purpose, dry scabs should be sent to the laboratory.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Skin Diseases, Infectious'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.