Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/241. Intercellular IgA dermatosis.

    We report three cases of intercellular IgA dermatosis (IAD) and review the literature. IAD is a spectrum of vesiculobullous or vesiculopustular diseases mediated by intercellular IgA deposition. The clinical picture may vary from a vesiculopustular eruption with centrifugal evolution mainly involving the trunk and extremities, to the typical picture of classic pemphigus variants (foliaceus, vegetans). Histologically, infiltrating polymorphonuclear cells (mainly neutrophils) are observed in the epidermis with formation of pustules and bullae at various levels. However cases with typical histological features of pemphigus (variants) are described. Direct immunofluorescence on perilesonal skin typically displays intercellular IgA deposition at different levels or throughout the epidermis and indirect immunofluorescence often detects low levels of circulating antibodies. The disease has been repeatedly reported in association with monoclonal IgA gammopathy. Most cases respond to dapsone. In some cases IgA is directed against known pemphigus antigens whereas their targets in other cases are newly discovered antigens (105 kD, 115 kD, 120 kD). We observe a heterogeneity within the clinical, histological and immunological characteristics of the disease. Many reported cases feature various combinations of these characteristics. We therefore consider IAD as a disease spectrum with IgA pemphigus (clinical and histological pemphigus) at one end and intercellular IgA vesiculopustular dermatosis at the other end.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/241. linear iga bullous dermatosis in a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia: possible involvement of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    We describe a case of linear iga bullous dermatosis (LABD) in a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia during treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). After a drug eruption due to imipenem cilastatin sodium had disappeared, bullous lesions appeared on the trunk. Results of histopathological studies and direct immunofluorescence studies of the lesion were consistent with LABD. Reinstitution of G-CSF after the resolution, however, did not reproduce the bullous eruptions. This suggests that in addition to G-CSF, the presence of precipitating factors that can synergistically enhance or accelerate the outbreak of the disease is required for the development of bullous lesions. Various cytokines, such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), endogenously produced from activated lymphocytes during the drug eruption might have provided a favorable milieu for the onset of G-CSF-induced LABD. We suggest that patients with LABD will need special attention with respect to the type of cytokines or combination of cytokines given as therapeutic modalities.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/241. IgA multiple myeloma presenting as an acquired bullous disorder.

    A 63-year-old man presented with an intensely pruritic vesiculo-bullous eruption on the limbs and was subsequently found to have an IgA kappa multiple myeloma. The eruption clinically and histologically was suggestive of linear IgA disease (LAD), dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), or bullous lupus erythematosus (LE), with the skin biopsy revealing subepidermal bullae and dermal papillary micro-abscesses. However, direct immunofluorescence showed a unique pattern of diffuse dermal IgA staining. Although chemotherapy produced a dramatic resolution of the lesions, which paralleled the fall in serum IgA paraprotein level, the myeloma later became progressive and the resulting paraprotein increase was accompanied by recurrence of the eruption. We propose that this patient's rash was the presenting manifestation of his multiple myeloma, and was a consequence of transudation of IgA paraprotein into the dermis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/241. Linear IgA disease associated with lymphocytic colitis.

    A 66-year-old woman presented with a bullous skin eruption and chronic diarrhoea. Lesional skin showed subepidermal blistering, and direct immunofluorescence of perilesional skin revealed linear deposits of IgA at the dermoepidermal junction, establishing a diagnosis of linear IgA disease (LAD). Chronic watery diarrhoea complicated by substantial loss of body weight preceded the skin eruption for several months. On endoscopy, the colon appeared macroscopically normal. On histology, the colon mucosa showed increased numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes and infiltrates of mononuclear cells in the lamina propria, indicative of lymphocytic colitis. Treatment with methylprednisolone and dapsone led to complete clearing of the bullous skin eruption and marked improvement of the patient's diarrhoea. Gastrointestinal disorders such as lymphocytic colitis have rarely been reported in patients with LAD. Whether the simultaneous occurrence of these two diseases is coincidental or due to related pathogenetic mechanisms remains to be seen.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/241. Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis in infancy: report of two new cases.

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF) is a cutaneous inflammatory follicular disorder of unknown etiology. The diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical and histopathologic features. We describe two patients who had recurrent episodes of pruritic follicular papular and pustular lesions on the face, extremities, and trunk. The eruptions lasted for 1 month with intermittent remissions. Laboratory tests disclosed no infectious or parasitic etiology in patient 2. In patient 1 we isolated methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in a blood culture. He had sepsis with lung and liver involvement. EPF is a self-limited dermatosis. On occasion, skin lesions may become superinfected, resulting in localized pyoderma or rarely systemic infection (sepsis). Histologically both of our patients showed a moderate mixed inflammatory infiltrate with numerous eosinophils centered around hair follicles. Their lesions responded well to topical corticosteroids.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/241. Linear IgA disease histopathologically and clinically masquerading as lichen planus.

    In each of 2 cases reported, the patient presented with features of erosive lichen planus or lichenoid drug eruptions and an incisional biopsy taken from the patient was diagnosed histologically as lichen planus. Subsequent recurrences or exacerbations were associated with vesiculobullous lesions. Simultaneous or subsequent direct immunofluorescence studies--from the same tissue sample in one case and from a similar site in the other case--demonstrated classic features of linear IgA disease. Both patients were originally treated for lichen planus with systemic and/or topical corticosteroids with limited success. One patient was treated with sulfapyridine with minimal improvement. Both patients were subsequently treated with dapsone and demonstrated significant clinical improvement. We propose that linear IgA disease may be more common than reported in the oral cavity, inasmuch as many cases of recalcitrant lichen planus, erosive lichen planus, and lichenoid drug eruptions, especially those with a vesiculobullous component, may in reality represent linear IgA disease. We recommend that direct immunofluorescence be done in any case in which bullous lichen planus is suspected.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/241. Grover's disease in patients with chronic renal failure receiving hemodialysis: clinicopathologic review of 4 cases.

    In 4 patients undergoing hemodialysis for chronic renal failure, a transient or persistent, papular and keratotic eruption developed on the trunk and arms. Histologic examination disclosed focal acantholysis with dyskeratosis. The lesions were clinically and histologically indistinguishable from those of Grover's disease. A possible association with Grover's disease and chronic renal failure and/or hemodialysis is postulated. Possible implicated pathogenic mechanisms are discussed. We suggest that Grover's disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous eruptions in patients with chronic renal failure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/241. A subepidermal bullous eruption associated with IgG autoantibodies to a 200 kd dermal antigen: the first case report from the united states.

    We describe an 81-year-old white man in whom a subepidermal bullous eruption developed that clinically resembled bullous pemphigoid. The eruption promptly responded to oral tetracycline and niacinamide and topical clobetasol. Histologic examination of perilesional skin revealed neutrophilic infiltration with formation of papillary microabscesses and subepidermal cleavage. Direct immunofluorescence showed linear deposition of IgG and C3 along the basement membrane zone. By indirect immunofluorescence, circulating IgG autoantibodies bound exclusively to the dermal side of salt-split normal human skin. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the patient's autoantibodies reacted with a 200 kd dermal protein that was different from type VII collagen, the epidermolysis bullosa acquisita autoantigen. This patient represents the first confirmed case from the united states with a recently reported novel autoimmune subepidermal bullous disease associated with IgG autoantibodies to a 200 kd dermal antigen.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/241. Extensive haemorrhagic-bullous skin manifestation of systemic AA-amyloidosis associated with IgGlambda-myeloma.

    In an 86-year-old woman with a multiple myeloma of the IgG lambda subtype a coinciding systemic amyloidosis manifested as a macroglossia, diffuse alopecia and generalized cutaneous involvement. The skin was affected by milium-like papules, petechial haemorrhages and an increased tissue fragility with subsequent blister formation. The typical histology and immunohistology pattern revealed large intradermal amyloid masses, reacting positively with anti-amyloid A antibodies, which surrounded cuff-like dilatated blood capillaries. The abundance of these amyloid deposits led to significant deflexibilization and fragility of the capillaries and the dermal matrix eventually resulting in the haemorrhagic-bullous eruptions. The peculiar feature of the present case is the intensity of bullous-haemorrhagic skin damage due to amyloid A deposition without any detection of cutaneous IgGl as the myeloma-derived paraprotein assumed to be causative for the development of systemic AA amyloidosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/241. Papules and pustules of the elbows and knees: an uncommon clinical sign of dermatomyositis in oriental children.

    We report two children with dermatomyositis in whom the initial manifestation was a papular eruption on the extensor surfaces of the elbows and knees. In each there was a follicular component to the eruption and one child had pustular lesions. The extensor eruption predated the onset of muscle weakness by 1 year in the first child and by 2 years in the second. Both children had Vietnamese parents. There is some evidence in the literature that Oriental patients may be predisposed to this type of eruption.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.