Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/32. A successful challenge in a patient with vancomycin-induced linear IgA dermatosis.

    BACKGROUND: linear iga bullous dermatosis (LABD), a subepidermal, blistering skin disease, is generally believed to be idiopathic. It has been reported in association with multiple medications, including vancomycin. In each case, complete clearance of the skin lesions occurred with discontinued use of the drug. A subsequent rechallenge reproduced the eruption within hours to days. OBJECTIVE: To present a patient with vancomycin-associated LABD who underwent a successful challenge with the antibiotic 4 years after the initial reaction. methods: The patient developed blistering lesions over her trunk and extremities 10 days after the initiation of vancomycin for sepsis. A biopsy specimen of a skin eruption was consistent with linear IgA dermatosis. Following discontinued use of the drug, her skin lesions resolved. Four years later, she required vancomycin for osteomyelitis. RESULTS: The patient underwent a vancomycin-graded challenge of 5 doses over 5 days. On day 1, she received 10 mg, and this was increased in a semilog fashion to 1,000 mg on day 5. She had no recurrence of her skin lesions. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first case, to our knowledge, to show a successful rechallenge in a patient with drug-associated LABD. Since the patient did not have a reaction to the challenge, it is possible that the IgA antibodies responsible for drug-induced LABD are only present transiently and diminish over time.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/32. Bullous prurigo pigmentosa.

    prurigo pigmentosa is a rare inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology, characterized by recurrent, symmetrical, pruritic, erythematous papules resulting in gross reticular hyperpigmentation. The rash occurs mainly on the back, the chest and the nape of the neck. While PP is observed rather frequently in japan, only a few cases have come to notice in other countries. Vesicular or bullous forms have been reported only rarely. The differential diagnosis includes lichen pigmentosus, pigmented contact dermatitis, confluent and reticulated papillomatosis of Gougerot and Carteaud, dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous lichen ruber planus.This case report concerns a young Caucasian patient with prurigo pigmentosa, in whom predominantly vesicular, but also bullous manifestations appeared on an existing maculopapular eruption on the trunk.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/32. Pleural effusions in an overlap syndrome of idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and erythema elevatum diutinum.

    We report a patient with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome presenting with bilateral eosinophilic pleural effusions. He also had erythema elevatum diutinum, a rare skin disease of the vasculitic type. No cardiomyopathy was present. Pleural effusions, skin lesions, and blood eosinophilia disappeared with prolonged corticosteroid treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/32. Bullous pemphigoid-associated nephropathy: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Bullous pemphigoid has previously been reported in association with a variety of renal lesions. Two additional cases are presented in this report in which the nephropathy preceded the onset of the skin disease: one case with membranous glomerulopathy and one case of renal allograft rejection with concurrent membranous pathology. Both patients had positive immunofluorescence of the skin, typical of bullous pemphigoid. Institution of systemic corticosteroid therapy resulted in a satisfactory clinical response and cessation of the blistering process. These cases and a review of the literature suggest that the occurrence of an immune process involving these two different basement membranes is not merely coincidental. Many cases have been described in which the severity of the skin lesions paralleled that of the renal disease. Although the possibility of multiple distinct autoimmune processes cannot be excluded, anti-basement-zone antibody interactions or allograft rejection-induced immune stimulation are possible unifying mechanisms for the simultaneous skin and renal involvement observed in these two cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/32. Bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma masquerading as dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    A black baby, born at full term of a normal healthy mother, showed multiple erosions and ulcers. No history of skin diseases was known in the family. A skin biopsy taken shortly after birth from an arm lesion showed subepidermal edema and cavity formation. Electron microscopy showed clumping of microfibrils and anchoring fibril-like fibers at the dermo-epidermal junction. In more severely affected areas, absence of anchoring fibrils and collagenolysis were found and the diagnosis of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa was made. Two weeks later, the lesions healed without leaving scars and a second biopsy from the chest area revealed typical histopathology of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/32. Bullous amyloidosis.

    amyloidosis may present with involvement of a variety of organ systems. Cutaneous involvement is a relatively common finding in patients with systemic amyloidosis. The occurrence of bullous skin lesions, however, is rare; only a few such cases have been previously reported. We describe a patient who presented with a subepidermal bullous skin disease initially thought to be bullous pemphigoid based on both clinical and histologic appearances. The patient subsequently developed the nephrotic syndrome. biopsy specimens of the skin and kidney showed involvement of both organs with amyloid, and amyloid was later found in the spleen, heart, and nervous system. No subsequent evidence of myeloma was found in this patient. The clinical, histopathologic, immunofluorescent, and electron microscopic findings of systemic amyloidosis are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/32. Homozygous variegate porphyria. A severe skin disease of infancy.

    A boy exhibited severe bullous skin disease a few days after birth, followed by increased fragility of the exposed skin in spring and summer. Examination at 2 1/2 years of age led to characteristic biochemical findings: increased excretion of fecal porphyrins (coproporphyrin 121 to 131 and protoporphyrin 467 to 576 nmol/g dry weight), and increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration (3643 to 4840 nmol/l). Lymphocyte protoporphyrinogen oxidase activity was very low in the patient (0.4 nmol/mg protein/h) and half-normal (2.7 and 2.3 nmol/mg protein/h) in the parents, suggesting that the patient had homozygous variegate porphyria. Severe skin symptoms and a high concentration of red cell protoporphyrin concentration in an infant should prompt suspicion of homozygous acute hepatic porphyria.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/32. Atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with subcorneal IgA deposits.

    A 26-year-old woman had a chronic vesiculopustular and ulcerating skin disease associated with fever and arthritis. Cutaneous biopsy specimens showed an extensive infiltration of the dermis and epidermis by neutrophils. Direct immunofluorescence (IF) revealed linear subcorneal IgA deposits. Indirect IF showed IgA antibodies reactive with the subcorneal zone of normal epidermis. The disease responded to dapsone therapy. The association between neutrophilic dermatoses, including pyoderma gangrenosum, subcorneal pustular dermatosis, and related entities, and IgA involvement, either IgA gammopathies and/or intraepidermal IgA deposits, is emphasized. Intraepidermal IgA deposits are possibly involved in the pathogenesis of our patient's condition and of other cases of unusual neutrophilic dermatoses.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/32. Bullous disease of childhood.

    Bullous disease of childhood (BDC) is a persistent or recurrent blistering skin disease characterized by large, tense bullae in a generalized distribution, but with a predilection for the scalp, trunk, pubis, and inner thighs. It usually begins in the first decade of life and spontaneously remits after several months to three years of activity. sulfapyridine or dapsone therapy usually controls the disease. Administration of corticosteroids for systemic effects should be avoided.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/32. Benign mucous membrane pemphigoid with linear IgA deposits in oral mucosa.

    Two patients with severe oral ulcerations and concomitant lesions in the nose, eyes and genitals were examined. The immunofluorescence (IFL) studies of buccal and genital mucosa revealed that the only deposited immunoglobulin was IgA. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed the linear pattern of IgA deposition and localized IgA in lamina lucida in both patients. dapsone 50 mg daily was effective in controlling the disease activity partially in the first and completely in the second patient. The results suggest that our patients had benign mucous membrane pemphigoid (BMMP) was linear IgA deposition but do not exclude a mucosal form of a newly recognized bullous skin disease termed linear IgA disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skin disease
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.