Cases reported "Skin Diseases"

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1/11. Cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction to injectable hyaluronic acid gel.

    BACKGROUND: Injectable hyaluronic acid gel is a non-animal biomaterial used for soft tissue augmentation. OBJECTIVE: The dermal implantation of this naturally occurring polysaccharide is reported to be well tolerated by patients, with a longer duration in tissue than bovine collagen without any major local or systemic side effects. We report a case of an acute hypersensitivity reaction in a woman after her third injection for improvement of melolabial fold wrinkles. methods: An adverse granulomatous-like response to the intradermal injection of a modified hyaluronic acid gel is described. RESULTS: The patient developed indurated and erythematous papulocystic nodules in the melolabial folds bilaterally at the sites of injection. CONCLUSION: Injectable hyaluronic acid gel can be associated with severe allergic reactions and patients should be warned of this possible treatment side effect.
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2/11. Pasteurella canis osteomyelitis and cutaneous abscess after a domestic dog bite.

    The genus Pasteurella is part of the normal oral flora of many animals, including domestic cats and dogs. In humans, Pasteurella may cause complications ranging from cellulitis to septicemia but rarely causes osteomyelitis or septic arthritis after bites and/or scratches by cats and dogs. Although pasteurella multocida is a common cause of infection, other Pasteurella species have also been cultured from wounds in humans. We describe here, a case of a cutaneous abscess and acute osteomyelitis associated with P canis after a domestic dog bite. To our knowledge, no previous case of P canis has been reported as the cause of acute osteomyelitis in humans.
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3/11. Obsessive-compulsive disorders and dermatologic disease.

    obsessive-compulsive disorder and obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders are often associated with dermatologic manifestations. The phenomenology is discussed and possible animal models explored. Treatment involves both pharmacotherapy and cognitive behavior therapy. Many of these patients experience considerable shame over their behavior and may be reluctant to acknowledge the existence of a psychiatric disorder. The dermatologist's approach to this patient is discussed.
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keywords = animal
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4/11. Cutaneous myiasis presenting as chronic furunculosis--case report.

    myiasis is the infection of tissue or organ of living humans or animals by the maggot or larval stages of flies. In africa, the most common fly responsible for cutaneous myiasis is the tumbu fly, Cordylobia anthropophaga. We present two cases of cutaneous myiasis seen on the upper abdominal wall and anterior chest wall. Both were initially diagnosed as furuncle (common boil), but from high index of suspicion of myiasis, followed by application of petroleum jelly and palm oil to occlude the spiracle and the expulsion of larva stage of Cordylobia anthropophaga the diagnoses in both cases were confirmed.
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keywords = animal
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5/11. Characterization of human papillomavirus 3 in warts of a renal allograft patient.

    Multiple flat wart-like lesions of a renal allograft recipient were shown to contain HPV 3 or a serologically crossreacting virus by indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific animal antisera against HPV [1--5]. The patient's serum revealed virus specific antibodies (immunofluorescence titer 1/80). Papillomaviruses were isolated and after in vitro iodination 3 major proteins (MW 70.000, 56.000 and 43.000) were detected by SDS polyacryalmide gel electrophoresis. dna was extracted from the warts and cleaved with the restriction endonuclease Hae III. Distinct bands were discernible within the background of cellular dna and these fragments were identified as papillomavirus dna by blot hypbridization with 32P-labeled viral dna.
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keywords = animal
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6/11. Focal mucinosis in dogs: seven cases and review of cutaneous mucinoses of man and animals.

    Seven dogs had one or more asymptomatic nodules, papules, or plaques on the skin or oral mucosa. The primary histologic feature was the accumulation of excess mucin within the dermis or submucosa. Based upon the clinical presentation and the histopathologic changes, it was proposed that these lesions represent the canine analogue of focal mucinosis in man, and that the same name be applied to the lesion in dogs. The criteria for the diagnosis of focal mucinosis were: (1) the presence of a single (rarely multiple) papule, nodule, or plaque which may be firm, rubbery, or soft, (2) the accumulation of mucin which disrupts and separates collagen fibers, (3) mild to extensive fibroblast proliferation, and (4) a mild mononuclear cell infiltration. The mucinoses of man and animals were reviewed.
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7/11. Hazards of calcium gluconate therapy in the newborn infant: intra-arterial injection producing intestinal necrosis in rabbit ileum.

    Five infants received 10% calcium gluconate via umbilical artery catheters, which resulted in intestinal bleeding and lesions of the buttock, anus, groin, and thigh. The effects of intra-arterial calcium gluconate in two animal models were investigated. Injection of calcium into the aorta in the region of the posterior mesenteric artery resulted in immediate hyperperfusion of the descending colon; this may be an early hemodynamic response to injury in the area of colon supplied by this vessel. injections into the arterial arcade of the rabbit ileum resulted in intestinal necrosis and villous atrophy. The use of umbilical artery catheters for administration of calcium gluconate is potentially hazardous.
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8/11. cimetidine-induced xerosis and asteatotic dermatitis.

    cimetidine, a histamine H2-receptor antagonist, has previously been shown to have antiandrogenic activity in animals and to decrease the sebum excretion rate in humans. Two patients had generalized xerosis and asteatotic dermatitis that developed while they were receiving cimetidine therapy and resolved when cimetidine therapy was discontinued. We postulate that this skin change is related to the antiandrogenic properties of the drug and its effect on the sebum secretion rate.
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9/11. Percutaneous paraquat absorption. An association with cutaneous lesions and respiratory failure.

    Striking cutaneous lesions and death owing to respiratory failure occurred in a middle-aged woman eight weeks after initial cutaneous contact with the herbicide paraquat (1,1'dimethyl-4,4'dipyridylium dichloride). While similar changes have been described in animals, to our knowledge, serious morbidity or mortality owing to percutaneous absorption has not been described in man. This case report illustrates the extreme toxicity of this herbicide and demonstrates that lethal quantities of the drug may be absorbed from apparently trivial skin wounds. Stricter precautions, including the mandatory use of protective clothing, should be recommended whenever this material is used.
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keywords = animal
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10/11. Dermatosparaxis in children. A case report and review of the newly recognized phenotype.

    BACKGROUND: Dermatosparaxis is an autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder in animals that is caused by abnormal processing of type I procollagen and results in skin laxity and fragility. Only three humans with characteristic biochemical and electronmicroscopic findings have been recognized to date. OBSERVATIONS: We describe the clinical and electronmicroscopic findings in an affected boy who presented at birth with large full-thickness groin fissures, micrognathia, large fontanelles, umbilical hernia, and dental laminal cysts. He subsequently exhibited marked skin fragility, blue sclerae, joint laxity, increased bruisability, and growth retardation. The diagnosis of dermatosparaxis was made by electron-microscopic findings consisting of characteristic small, irregular, and circular collagen fibers in the skin. His phenotype is strikingly similar to two other reported children with the disorder, which is now classified in humans as Ehlers-Danlos VII-C. CONCLUSIONS: The newly recognized phenotype of Ehlers-Danlos VII-C is a distinct connective tissue disorder characterized by marked skin fragility and laxity, blue sclerae, increased bruisability, micrognathia, umbilical hernia, and growth retardation. A suspected clinical diagnosis can be confirmed by electron-microscopic and biochemical studies of connective tissue.
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