Cases reported "Skin Diseases"

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1/25. cowpox virus infection in an 11-year-old girl.

    We describe an 11-year-old girl with a cowpox virus infection, who presented with a 14-day-old crusted, ulcerated nodule on the chin/neck and a 6-day-old eroded blister on the left leg. The girl lived in a rural environment, had close contact to several cats from the neighborhood, and had an atopic predisposition. The presence of orthopox virus in the lesion on the left leg was demonstrated by electron microscopy (negative staining, transmission electron microscopy) and virus isolation. classification as a cowpox virus was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by restriction enzyme digestion of the PCR product.
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ranking = 1
keywords = transmission
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2/25. Treatment of atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini-associated hyperpigmentation with the Q-switched alexandrite laser: a clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural appraisal.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini (APP) is an uncommon cutaneous disorder, with no known effective treatment, manifested by hyperpigmented patches that appear to be depressed compared with surrounding skin. This study investigated the effectiveness of the Q-switched alexandrite laser on a patient with extensive APP, and evaluated histopathologic and ultrastructural changes. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND methods:A man with stable APP underwent Q-switched alexandrite laser treatment to a patch on the trunk. Biopsies were obtained from treated and untreated sites of involvement. light and transmission electron microscopic evaluation was performed to investigate melanosome number, size, and volume, as well as melanin granule number and size. RESULTS: After three treatment sessions, the treated area showed marked clinical improvement. Electron microscopy showed a 19% reduction in melanin granule number and size and a 65% reduction in melanosome number, size, and volume in larger melanosomes in treated compared with untreated sites. CONCLUSION: Treatment of APP with the Q-switched alexandrite laser results in clinical improvement. Electron microscopic evaluation suggests that the mechanism may be a reduction in the number, size, and volume of larger melanosomes as well as a decrement in melanin granule number and size.
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ranking = 1
keywords = transmission
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3/25. Progressive osseous heteroplasia. A case report and review of the literature.

    Progressive osseous heteroplasia is a rare childhood disorder that is characterized by ectopic progressive ossification of skin, muscle, and connective tissue. We report a 5 year-old female patient with familial transmission. She developed cutaneous calcifications and ossifications within the first 2 months of life. Her father and father's aunt had subcutaneous nodules. At the age of 5 years, physical examination of the patient revealed ossified subcutaneous nodules and plaques on both upper limbs, the right side was predominantly affected. All the joints of the upper limbs were ankylosed except the left shoulder. biopsy specimens of the patient and her father revealed islands of bone in the reticular dermis and deep dermis, respectively. We suggest that all family members of progressive osseous heteroplasia patients are carefully investigated for ossified nodules because of autosomal dominant inheritance.
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ranking = 1
keywords = transmission
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4/25. Cutaneous manifestations of internal diseases.

    Collaboration between specialists is necessary for good practice of medicine. The dermatological examination, mainly based on visual characteristics, can greatly help other specialisms when confronted with a seemingly futile skin anomaly. We discuss the various cutaneous features of some metabolic and infectious diseases, the pitfalls in diagnosing lupus erythematosus without knowledge of skin disease and the relationship of dermatological diseases as cutaneous vasculitis, pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet's syndrome, pemphigus and more to internal disease.
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ranking = 9.6556278019319
keywords = infectious disease
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5/25. Systemic and cutaneous plasmacytosis with multiple skin lesions and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinaemia: significant serum interleukin-6 levels.

    We report two patients who developed benign plasmacytosis with multiple skin lesions. The cases were characterized by hyperplasia of mature plasma cells, and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinaemia. One patient had hyperplasia of mature plasma cells not only in the skin, but also extensively in lymph nodes and the retroperitoneal areas around the ureters. The other had plasma cell hyperplasia limited to the skin. Extensive investigations failed to reveal any clinical or laboratory evidence suggesting the presence of any underlying disease accompanying the hypergammaglobulinaemia and/or plasma cell proliferation, such as chronic infectious disease, collagen disease or other chronic inflammatory disorder. Clinically and histologically, the first patient showed features compatible with a diagnosis of systemic plasmacytosis and the second with a diagnosis of cutaneous plasmacytosis. Significant serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were detected in both patients, suggesting that IL-6 may be involved in the pathogenesis of these conditions.
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ranking = 9.6556278019319
keywords = infectious disease
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6/25. Isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in cutaneous blister fluid.

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (hiv-1) has been isolated from a number of body fluids, including semen, tears, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, breast milk, alveolar fluid, and vaginal fluid, but it has not been isolated from fluid-containing skin lesions. We report the isolation of hiv-1 from cutaneous blister fluid in a patient with concomitant hiv-1 infection and porphyria cutanea tarda. Although transmission of hiv-1 through casual contact has not been reported, appropriate precautions should be taken to avoid direct contact with cutaneous fluid-containing lesions in hiv-1-positive patients.
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ranking = 1
keywords = transmission
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7/25. Autosomal dominant transmission of the NAME syndrome (nevi, atrial myxoma, mucinosis of the skin and endocrine overactivity).

    A family affected in two generations with the NAME syndrome is described, and the literature on this phenotype reviewed. The term "NAME" was originally proposed as an acronym for "nevi, atrial myxoma, myxoid neurofibromata and ephelides". However, in order to give a more comprehensive description of this syndrome, we recommend the following alternative interpretation of "NAME": nevi, atrial myxoma, mucinosis of the skin, endocrine overactivity. Previous family observations suggested a dominant, and probably autosomal, inheritance but an X-linked dominant transmission could not be excluded. We describe male-to-male transmission, strongly supporting the concept of the autosomal inheritance of this trait.
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ranking = 6
keywords = transmission
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8/25. Evaluation of clinically normal appearing skin for systemic infectious diseases in human immunodeficiency virus seropositive patients.

    The observation of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patient with cutaneous ulcers which contained both fungal and viral pathogens, and in which the fungal organisms were grown in culture yet could not be demonstrated microscopically, suggested the possibilities: 1) that the skin lesions might have been primarily caused by the viral pathogen, and 2) that the concurrent presence of that fungal pathogen was coincidental and perhaps secondary to fungemia. Assuming that these postulates are valid, it is reasonable to hypothesize that fungal organisms would have been detected if perilesional or distal, clinically normal appearing, skin had been evaluated. This hypothesis could be further assessed by performing a prospective study of clinically normal appearing skin for pathogens of suspected systemic infectious diseases in HIV seropositive patients. Since the quantity of infectious pathogens in nonlesional skin may be limited, it might be difficult to grow the organisms in culture or demonstrate them microscopically using standard methods. Therefore, in addition to routine cultures and histologic evaluation, immunohistochemical techniques using monoclonal antibodies to pathogen antigens and dna amplification techniques based upon the polymerase chain reaction should be used to enhance the detection of the infectious pathogens.
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ranking = 48.278139009659
keywords = infectious disease
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9/25. Restrictive dermopathy: a newly recognized autosomal recessive skin dysplasia.

    A brother and sister from consecutive pregnancies had rigid and tightly adherent skin in association with generalized contractures, unusual facies, pulmonary hypoplasia, an abnormal placenta, and a short umbilical cord. Both died shortly after birth. Pathologic examination of the skin by light and electron microscopy showed structural abnormalities of the epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous fat. An abnormal pattern of keratin proteins was determined biochemically using extracted epidermal proteins. autopsy showed a normal spinal cord and muscle histology. It is postulated that the defective skin severely restricted movement and secondarily led to the other abnormalities. Familial occurrence is most consistent with autosomal recessive transmission. These patients and the primary skin defect are discussed within the framework of the Fetal Akinesia or hypokinesia Deformation Sequence.
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ranking = 1
keywords = transmission
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10/25. Reactive perforating collagenosis: light, ultrastructural and immunohistological studies.

    Reactive perforating collagenosis is an uncommon disorder and few accounts refer to ultrastructural features. This report includes a study by light and transmission electron microscopy of serially sectioned biopsies from early lesions in two patients. Immunohistological investigations utilizing antibodies to basement membrane, laminin, collagen and cytokeratin were also done. collagen and elastin were demonstrated within the centre of the lesions and there was a defect in the basal lamina at the base of the lesion. The collagen, cytokeratin and the basal lamina in the lesions were antigenically similar to those in the surrounding normal skin. These results are compared with previous findings and discussed in the light of the current views on the pathogenesis of this disorder.
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ranking = 1
keywords = transmission
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