Cases reported "Skin Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/138. Microcystic adnexal carcinoma associated with primary immunodeficiency, recurrent diffuse herpes simplex virus infection, and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Cutaneous microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC) is a rare and poorly understood tumor that predominantly occurs in the head and neck. MAC usually affects people in their fourth and fifth decades. Some patients have had a history of radiation. We present a case of MAC occurring in the left antecubital fossa of an 18-year-old white woman with an unusual immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient also developed a squamous cell carcinoma, a cutaneous T-cell malignancy, and a perigastric leiomyoma. A congenital infection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) persisted throughout her life. The association of HSV infection with MAC and squamous cell carcinoma and that of peripheral T-cell lymphoma with Epstein-Barr virus is discussed in relation to her immunodeficiency.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/138. Microcystic adnexal carcinoma: report of 13 cases and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: Microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC) is a rare tumor of the skin. Clinically it often masquerades as a firm, subcutaneous nodule on the head and neck regions. Microscopically it extends far beyond assessed clinical margins spreading locally in the dermal, subcutaneous, and perineural tissue planes. The local recurrence rate by standard excision is about 50%. Recent preliminary reports indicate more favorable cure rates with Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). OBJECTIVE: To present our data on 13 cases (12 patients) of MAC treated by MMS. In addition, we reviewed the medical literature to summarize the accumulated experience of MMS treatment in the management of MAC. We also present a case of bilateral MAC of the face and describe a renal transplant recipient on immunosuppressive therapy who developed MAC of the nasal bridge. methods: We reviewed and updated our series of MAC cases treated by MMS over the last 9 years. A total of 13 cases of MAC are reviewed. We also searched the literature for MAC treated by MMS with a follow-up of more than 2-years. RESULTS: One patient had bilateral MAC of the nose and cheek. Another patient developed a MAC of the nasal bridge 20 years after renal transplantation. In this patient predisposing factors were radiation for teenage acne and immunosuppression therapy. A total of 13 cases of MAC were treated by MMS with no recurrences, with a mean follow-up of 5.0 years (range 1.1-8.0 years). CONCLUSION: We update the medical literature with 13 MAC cases treated by MMS. To our knowledge there have been 148 cases of MAC reported in the world literature. Including our series, there have been 73 cases of MAC treated with MMS. There were only four treatment failures. Regional and/or distant metastasis from MAC is rare, with only one reported death. Following MMS, the 2-year success rate was 89.7% (35 of 39). The accumulated data continue to confirm that when MAC is discovered early and is readily accessible to excision by MMS and other subspecialty support, a favorable outcome can be expected.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/138. Scratched pustule or gunshot wound? A medical odyssey.

    The diagnosis of a gunshot wound can be difficult especially if the morphology is not typical. In the case presented a neck injury was not recognised as a gunshot wound by several clinicians and radiologists although the bullet could be seen at the base of the patient's tongue and on all x-rays taken. This misinterpretation may have been caused by a "professional blinkers phenomenon".
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/138. Subepidermal calcified nodule.

    Subepidermal calcified nodule is an uncommon, but specific subtype of idiopathic calcinosis. It presents as an asymptomatic, solitary, yellow-white or erythematous filiform tumor. The most common location is on the head and neck region of male children. serum calcium and phosphorus levels are normal. Histopathologic examination reveals a focal papillary dermal collection of dark blue-staining, large, amorphous deposits, and/or small calcified globules surrounded by a lymphohistiocytic infiltrate. The causes and histiogenesis of these deposits have not been fully established, but the most favored theory is that calcium is deposited on a preexisting lesion. The treatment of choice is surgical removal with histopathologic examination. We describe a healthy 11-year-old Caucasian boy with an asymptomatic, warty growth below his left eye. Excision with histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of subepidermal calcified nodule. There has been no sign of recurrence to date.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/138. Dermal thymus: case report and review of the literature.

    An aberrant thymus is not uncommon; it is usually located in the subcutaneous tissue and attaches to deeper structures, but it rarely occurs within the dermis (dermal thymus). We report on an 8-month-old male infant with a dermal thymus. He was born with a skin tumor on the right side of the neck, located just over the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The tumor was soft, dark red, and elevated. It measured 10 by 21 mm in diameter. The surface was erosive and partially covered with crust. The infant also had a unilateral cleft lip and a deformity of the bilateral auricles. Because of recurrent episodes of infection, the tumor was resected and histologically diagnosed as a dermal thymus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/138. dermoscopy in the diagnosis of tinea nigra plantaris.

    tinea nigra is a relatively uncommon dermatiaceous fungal infection, usually caused by Phaeoannellomyces werneckii, that may mimic a melanocytic lesion. We describe the value of epiluminescent dermoscopy of tinea nigra plantaris compared with other common diagnostic tools and procedures available (clinical appearance, potassium hydroxide [KOH], culture, culture mount preparation, and biopsy). A case of tinea nigra plantaris was evaluated clinically, microscopically with KOH, and dermatoscopically. Dermatoscopic findings were evaluated according to the Stolz system. dermoscopy, clinical presentation, and microscopy with KOH all confirmed the diagnosis, with dermoscopy being the fastest and simplest procedure. dermoscopy is a useful clinical adjuntive tool in differentiating tinea nigra from a melanocytic lesion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/138. Persistent atypical lymphocytic hyperplasia following tick bite in a child: report of a case and review of the literature.

    We report a 6-year-old girl who developed a red papule on the posterior neck at the site of a previous tick bite. Initial biopsy was performed a year after the bite and the specimen showed a dense lymphoid infiltrate with admixed CD30 cells. The patient was referred to our center because of concern about the development of a CD30 lymphoproliferative disorder. The lesion was completely excised. histology showed no evidence of a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder or borrelia infection, but persistence of CD30 cells. This case demonstrates that a tick bite reaction can persist for more than 1 year and show immunophenotypic and morphologic overlap with a CD30 lymphoproliferative disorder. Complete history with thorough clinical and histopathologic evaluation is necessary to arrive at the correct diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/138. A case of eruptive collagenoma localized on the neck and shoulders.

    A 78-year-old woman, who had first noticed asymptomatic eruptions on her neck and shoulders eight years earlier, presented with papules and nodules 2 to 20 mm in diameter that had a normal to white hue and were flatly elevated. These lesions were scattered and multiple, some forming confluent plaques. Histopathologically, the epidermis was slightly atrophied, and collagen fibers in the dermis were coarse and proliferated. In addition, the number of elastic fibers was slightly decreased. No complications were evident. Based on these findings, the patient was given a diagnosis of mild eruptive collagenoma, a type of connective tissue nevus according to the classification of Uitto. This case is unique in that onset was at an advanced age and that distribution was localized on the neck and shoulders.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/138. Artefactual skin disease in children and adolescents.

    As in adults, artefactual skin disease in children and adolescents has heterogenous presentations with multifactorial aetiology. We report a series of 32 young patients aged 8-16 years. There were 24 females and 8 males. In over half of the cases the lesions were on the head and neck. The types of lesions encountered included physical injury producing grazing, erosions and deep ulcers, chemical and thermal burns, hair cutting and shaving and skin painting. We discuss the approach that we believe should be taken with these patients, emphasizing the role of dermatology-psychiatry liaison in their management. Of great importance is the avoidance of confrontation of the patient but the clear exposition of the nature of the problem to the parents. The major aim should be to have the family accept the need for expert psychiatric assistance.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/138. Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma.

    Annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma is a granulomatous process that presents as slowly growing annular papules and plaques on sun-exposed skin. It was first described in patients in the fourth and fifth decades of life. These lesions are primarily distributed on the head and neck. A review of the literature shows a preponderance of cases in adults. We report two cases of annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma developing in children under the age of 11 years.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Skin Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.