Cases reported "Skin Neoplasms"

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1/36. Palmar basal cell carcinoma: case report and literature review.

    BACKGROUND: Although basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common tumor of the skin, its occurrence on the palm is very rare. Only eight cases not associated with the basal cell nevus syndrome having been reported in the world literature so far. Among these eight cases, one was associated with epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica and another with previous trauma to the site of the appearance of the lesion. OBJECTIVE: The authors report a case of palmar BCC due to its rare occurrence on that site. The case is not associated with any predisposing factors such as basal cell nevus syndrome, trauma, or preexistent dermatosis. methods: An incisional biopsy was performed into the border of the palmar ulcer. The histopathologic findings of the fragment, stained by hematoxylin and eosin, were characteristic of BCC. RESULTS: Following surgical removal of the lesion, there was complete healing and the patient has presented no signs of relapse after 3 years of clinical follow-up. CONCLUSION: Palmar BCC not associated with the basal cell nevus syndrome or any other predisposing condition is very rare. Nevertheless, when facing an ulcerated lesion on the palm, BCC should be considered as a diagnostic possibility.
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ranking = 1
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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2/36. Squamous cell carcinoma secondary to recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: report of eight tumours in four patients.

    BACKGROUND: The development of squamous cell carcinomas is the main cause of death of patients with Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. We think it is of interest to know their clinical characteristics and the treatment difficulties they cause. methods: We followed the clinical evolutions and carried out histopathological studies of eight primary cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas on three males and one female with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Patient ages ranged from 16 to 34 years (mean 27). RESULTS: Two patients had two tumours and one three, all were in characteristically scarred skin; four on upper limbs; four on lower. Maximum tumour dimensions ranged from 2 to 28 cm (mean 13), and represented 6 or more months of evolution. In three cases the affected limb must be amputated. Five tumours were well differentiated, three were moderately differentiated. CONCLUSIONS: The patients consulted too late and their large lesions needed aggressive treatment. Appropriate information and regular examination of patients with RDEB helps early diagnosis of tumours and may avoid disabling operations.
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ranking = 6
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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3/36. Angiosarcoma of the scalp: treatment with liposomal doxorubicin and radiotherapy.

    PURPOSE: Angiosarcoma of the scalp and face is a rare malignant endothelial tumor arising mainly in elderly people. The prognosis is poor. Effective and safe treatments are warranted. methods: A 79-year-old woman with an angiosarcoma of the scalp larger than 5 cm in diameter was treated with intravenous liposomal doxorubicin, 20 mg per square meter body surface (i.e., 30 mg) once per month followed by radiotherapy. RESULTS: After 12 infusions of liposomal doxorubicin, we observed a partial remission with a > 50% decrease of affected area and disappearance of ulceration. After 21 infusions, however, there was no further improvement. We decided to discontinue chemotherapy but move on with radiotherapy with an electron beam using fractionated doses of 2 Gy five times per week for up to a total of 40 Gy. To ensure a maximum dose in the upper layer of the dermis a bolus technique was used. radiotherapy was terminated due to a temporary circumscribed epidermolysis. At the end of treatment a remarkable regression of the cutaneous lesion was noted. During the subsequent 24 months she has not developed any metastatic spread. CONCLUSION: Sequential therapy of bad prognosis angiosarcoma with liposomal doxorubicin followed by radiotherapy showed a marked clinical improvement and prolonged relapse-free survival in this patient.
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ranking = 0.27602347008107
keywords = epidermolysis
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4/36. Squamous cell carcinoma in junctional and dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    We report here on three patients suffering from recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and one suffering from generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa, all of whom developed cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Our observations and a review of the literature suggest that squamous cell carcinoma in generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa is very infrequent and has a better outcome compared to skin cancer in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. These differences could be explained by the distinct pathophysiology and clinical course of each of these variants of epidermolysis bullosa. In contrast to UV-induced skin cancer, the tumours in epidermolysis bullosa develop on distal extremities at sites of chronic wound healing. The cases reported here underline the exceptional importance of early histopathological assessment of suspicious skin lesions in patients with epidermolysis bullosa.
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ranking = 11
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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5/36. mycosis fungoides bullosa: report of a case and review of the literature.

    mycosis fungoides, the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, can manifest in a variety of clinical and histologic forms. Presentation with vesiculobullous lesions is extremely rare. We report the ninth documented case of mycosis fungoides bullosa in which other concomitant autoimmune blistering diseases were ruled out by negative immunofluorescence. All previously reported cases in the world literature since the first in 1887 are reviewed. We recommend the following defining criteria for the disease: (1) clinically apparent vesiculobullous lesions, with or without typical mycosis fungoides lesions (patches, plaques, tumors); (2) typical histologic features of mycosis fungoides (atypical lyphoid cells, epidermotropism, Pautrier's microabscesses) with intraepidermal or subepidermal blisters; (3) negative immunofluorescence (both direct and indirect, if possible) to rule out concomitant autoimmune bullous diseases; (4) negative evaluation for other possible causes of vesiculobullous lesions (eg, medications, bacterial or viral infection, porphyria, phototherapy).
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ranking = 0.29729478589648
keywords = bullosa
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6/36. A 13-year-old girl with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa presenting with squamous cell carcinoma.

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an uncommon and severely disabling genetic disorder characterized by trauma-induced blisters, intractable skin ulcers, scarring, milia, and nail dystrophy. patients with RDEB have an increased tendency for fast-growing and early metastasizing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We report here a 13-year-old girl with RDEB who developed a large SCC on the left knee. At 6 months of evolution it was resected and covered with an autologous skin graft. To our knowledge, this is the youngest patient with RDEB complicated by SCC to be reported, and therefore may serve to emphasize the importance of vigilance in surveying RDEB patients for SCC.
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ranking = 5
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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7/36. groin dissections in epidermolysis bullosa: a report of groin dissection for the control of metastatic squamous carcinoma in patients with epidermolysis bullosa.

    Epidermolysis bullosa predisposes to the development of squamous cell carcinoma. Despite regular surveillance, the majority of severely affected epidermolysis bullosa patients die from metastatic spread. There are no reports on regional control of metastatic spread. We describe our experience with two cases of groin dissection in epidermolysis bullosa. By anticipating the pitfalls in the perioperative care of patients with epidermolysis bullosa, we feel confident that they should make a full recovery.
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ranking = 11.059458957179
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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8/36. Free anterolateral thigh perforator flap for reconstruction of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa-associated squamous cell carcinoma in the foot: case report.

    The authors present a patient with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa-associated squamous cell carcinoma in the foot. The patient underwent successful reconstruction with a free anterolateral thigh flap based on a perforator with minimal donor site morbidity.
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ranking = 5
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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9/36. Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa complicated by cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and pulmonary and renal amyloidosis.

    A 25-year-old woman with Hallopeau-Siemens recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa had generalized blistering, scarring and milia since birth. In the course of the disease, acral pseudosyndactyly developed, and the patient suffered from corneal erosions, oesophageal strictures, malabsorption, recurrent severe pneumonias and nephrotic syndrome. In addition, she had severe anaemia, sideropaenia, hypocalcaemia, heavy proteinuria and hypoalbuminaemia. A rapidly growing skin squamous cell carcinoma developed on the neck that spread to axillary and cervical lymph nodes. Recurrent hypocalcaemic tetanic convulsions and dyspnoea and a pneumonia refractory to antibiotics led to the premature demise of the patient. autopsy revealed extensive amyloidosis of the renal, hepatic and splenic tissues. AA type amyloid deposits were detected in the renal glomeruli and in the lung, explaining the patient's unusually severe pulmonary infections. In essence, the patient had severe recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, complicated by squamous cell carcinoma, recurrent pneumonias and nephrotic syndrome due to secondary amyloidosis of the kidney and lung. The possibility of secondary pulmonary amyloidosis should be considered in severe dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa patients with recurrent pulmonary infections.
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ranking = 7
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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10/36. Squamous cell carcinoma in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, presenting as an ulcer that appears to be filled with granulation tissue.

    BACKGROUND: Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) is an important cause of death in patients with the severe form of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). These cancers often present with features that are different from those of actinically induced SCCA. OBJECTIVE: To emphasize the unusual features with which SCCA can present in RDEB and discuss early recognition of such cancers. methods: We present the case of a patient with RDEB who developed a cutaneous ulcer that appeared to be filled with heaped-up granulation tissue. biopsy, however, showed moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. RESULTS: The patient underwent wide surgical excision of the cancer, with split-thickness skin graft. She has remained disease-free three years later. CONCLUSION: In patients with RDEB, any ulcer that appears to be filled with heaped-up granulation tissue should be biopsied to rule out SCCA.
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ranking = 5
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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