Cases reported "Skin Neoplasms"

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11/62. Two cases of segmental multiple glomangiomas in a family: type 1 or type 2 segmental manifestation?

    Several autosomal dominant skin diseases may manifest cutaneous mosaicism. Two types of segmental arrangement can be distinguished: type 1 is characterized by segmental lesions with similar severity to that observed in the diffuse phenotype, the remaining skin being normal; type 2 is characterized by segmental lesions showing a major degree of severity and milder lesions diffusely arranged. Multiple glomus tumours have recently been included in the group of genodermatoses showing type 2 segmental involvement. A family with 2 cases of multiple glomangiomas arranged in a segmental fashion is reported. A 12-year-old girl presented multiple nodular glomangiomas on her right buttock and thigh, in a band-like distribution. A sister of her paternal grandfather showed plaque-like multiple glomangiomas on her left thigh and various glomangiomas on her right buttock and arm. No other family members were known to be affected. Two new cases of familial segmental multiple glomangiomas are reported, with the particularity that one of these exhibited type 2 segmental manifestation and the other type 1 from a clinical point of view.
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ranking = 1
keywords = glomangioma, glomus tumour, glomus
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12/62. Arteriovenous haemangioma in chronic liver disease: clinical and histopathological features of four cases.

    Chronic liver diseases are known to cause several skin manifestations, including cutaneous vascular changes such as spider naevus and palmar erythema. Arteriovenous haemangioma (AVH), a benign acquired cutaneous vascular lesion, has also been reported to be associated with chronic liver disease. We report here four cases of AVH in patients with chronic liver disease: (i) a 59-year-old man who had suffered from chronic active hepatitis associated with hepatitis c virus for 15 years; (ii) a 48-year-old man who had suffered from alcoholic hepatitis for 3 years and was diagnosed with liver cirrhosis 1 year ago; (iii) a 69-year-old female who had had chronic active hepatitis associated with hepatitis c virus infection for 20 years and was diagnosed with liver cirrhosis 7 years ago; and (iv) a 48-year-old man who had had chronic active hepatitis associated with hepatitis b virus infection for about 20 years. All patients showed an asymptomatic solitary dome-shaped reddish papule, 5-10 mm in diameter, on the face (first, second and third patients) or chest (fourth patient). Histopathological examination of the tumours revealed features of AVH, namely a well-circumscribed lesion composed of vascular structures of various sizes reminiscent of arteries and veins. In all four cases, elastic-van Gieson stain showed the absence of an internal elastic lamina in the thick-walled vessels as well as the thin-walled vessels. Examination of multiple sections demonstrated glomus cells and an ascending artery feeding the tumour vessels in only one case. Slight inflammatory cell infiltration was seen in the stroma of three patients while Toluidine blue staining revealed an increased number of mast cells in the stroma in all lesions. The present cases suggest that the occurrence of AVH associated with chronic liver disease is not related to any specific liver disease, but may be related to chronic liver dysfunction itself.
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ranking = 0.0063779967697539
keywords = glomus
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13/62. Congenital plaquelike glomus tumor in a child.

    An 8-year-old girl was seen in our outpatient clinic with a history of an angiomatous plaque on the chest since birth. She had complained of pain at the site of the lesion for 1 month. Histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical analysis led to the diagnosis of glomangioma, a rare congenital plaquelike glomus tumor. We review the literature and discuss the clinical presentation and evolution of this rare entity.
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ranking = 0.13656795069872
keywords = glomangioma, glomus
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14/62. Malignant glomus tumor: a case report and review of the literature.

    Glomangiosarcoma, or malignant glomus tumor, is a very rare neoplasm that when seen typically arises from a benign glomus tumor. Despite having histologic features of malignancy, these tumors usually do not metastasize. However, when metastasis occurs this disease is often fatal. We report a case of a malignant glomus tumor arising de novo on the nose of an 89-year-old white woman, and we review the literature concerning glomangiosarcomas.
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ranking = 0.044645977388278
keywords = glomus
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15/62. Uncommon hand tumours.

    This paper presented clinical examples of some rare or uncommon presentations of tumours of the hand, including glomus tumour, intraosseous dermoid, fibrolipoma of the radial nerve, blastomycotic cyst and synovial sarcoma. Each lesion is illustrated by review of case histories, radiological and pathological features.
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ranking = 0.057898298350464
keywords = glomus tumour, glomus
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16/62. Juxtaglomerular cell tumor: a clinicopathologic study of four cases and review of the literature.

    We studied 4 new cases of juxtaglomerular cell tumor and compared their morphologic and immunohistochemicalfeatures with 2 renal hemangiopericytomas and 5 cutaneous glomus tumors. The juxtaglomerular tumors were resectedfrom 2 males and 2 females (mean age at diagnosis, 23 years). Three patients manifested with severe hypertension. Tumors ranged from 2.2 to 8.0 cm and were well circumscribed. The tumors consisted of solid sheets and nodules of variably sized tumor cells with round, oval, and spindled nuclei alternating with edematous microcystic foci. Nuclear atypia, present in all tumors, was a prominent feature in 2. Mitotic activity was not identified. All cases showed hemorrhage, numerous mast cells, and thick-walled blood vessels. Unusual features included coagulative tumor necrosis, a hemangiopericytoma-like vascular pattern, and hyalinized stroma. All tumors were immunoreactive for CD34 and actin. Ultrastructural analysis revealed the presence of rhomboid-shaped renin protogranules. patients were treated by partial or radical nephrectomy and followed up for 14 to 48 months. There were no recurrences or metastases. The characteristic clinical and morphologic features of juxtaglomerular cell tumor permit distinction from renal hemangiopericytoma and other renal tumors.
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ranking = 0.0063779967697539
keywords = glomus
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17/62. Multiple hereditary glomangiomas: successful treatment with sclerotherapy.

    Glomangiomas are characterized by cavernous vascular channels surrounded by glomus cells. Multiple glomangiomas, although usually painless, can be a few centimetres in size and appear as blue phlebectatic lesions. Surgical excision of multiple glomangiomas can lead to scarring and recurrences. Laser treatment using vascular lasers and CO2 lasers has been useful in small, superficial lesions. We present the successful sclerotherapy treatment of multiple glomangiomas using sodium tetradecyl sulphate in a 59-year-old man who presented with postoperative recurrence of multiple lesions.
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ranking = 0.73912376471939
keywords = glomangioma, glomus
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18/62. Local and systemic expression of basic fibroblast growth factor in a patient with familial glomangioma.

    Glomangiomas are rare cutaneous tumours composed of glomus cells, which are modified smooth muscle cells. The aetiology of this condition is thought to involve a mutation in a novel gene acting to regulate angiogenesis. We report a patient from a large family with three generations affected by familial multiple glomangiomas. We hypothesized that the growth factors basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, which stimulate/regulate angiogenesis could be involved in the pathogenesis of these lesions. Therefore, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunohistochemistry, respectively, we measured systemic and tissue levels of these growth factors in a patient with familial glomangiomas. In addition, we investigated endothelial mitogenicity of the patient's serum as a functional assay of systemic growth factor activity.
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ranking = 0.63444579786944
keywords = glomangioma, glomus
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19/62. Glomangiomatosis.

    neoplasms containing glomus cells are uncommon. Glomus cells within an angiomatosis, so called glomangiomatosis, is exceedingly rare with only three previously reported cases. We are describing the fourth case from a 17-year-old boy which involved his left hand, fingers, and distal forearm. We will review the previously reported cases.
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ranking = 0.1110559636197
keywords = glomangioma, glomus
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20/62. On glomus tumors, warts, and razors.

    BACKGROUND: Occam's razor encourages ascribing a set of clinical findings to a single diagnosis. OBJECTIVE: To present a patient with a subungual wart and a glomus tumor of the same nail unit and to review the literature regarding these conditions. methods: We describe a 58-year-old female with a 2-year history of nail dystrophy and related symptoms that were initially attributed to verruca but recalcitrant to extensive therapies. RESULTS: Ultimately the persistence of her symptoms was found to be secondary to a subungual glomus tumor. CONCLUSION: Clinicians must maintain a high index of suspicion for the presence of multiple diagnoses to prevent the delay of appropriate management, particularly when symptoms do not respond to initial treatment.
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ranking = 0.038267980618524
keywords = glomus
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