Cases reported "Skin Neoplasms"

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1/600. Human herpes-virus 8 seropositive patient with skin and graft Kaposi's sarcoma after lung transplantation.

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) has been reported after solid organ transplantation mostly in recipients of renal, liver, heart, and bone allografts. We describe the first case of a patient with lung transplantation who developed KS of the skin, but also of the lung graft. The tumors were localized to places of previous trauma, implying the involvement of a Koebner phenomenon. Moreover, a polymerase chain reaction assay revealed the presence of dna sequences of herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) on tissue of the cutaneous KS. Serological tests showed HHV-8 seronegativity of the graft donor and HHV-8 seropositivity of the patient before lung transplantation suggesting that the latter was already infected before the surgery and that immunosuppression resulted in the development of KS. This case report raises the question of the prevalence of HHV-8 in candidates for transplantation and organ donors, and of the value of an antiviral prophylaxis to lower the risk of KS.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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2/600. Bone involvement in a case of Kaposi sarcoma.

    BACKGROUND: Extracutaneous involvement is rare in the classical form of Kaposi sarcoma (KS). observation: We report a case of bone involvement revealed by bone pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) images demonstrated the local invasion of bone from cutaneous lesions. Bone biopsy confirmed bone involvement. The patient was treated with vindesine. Bone pain progressively disappeared. CONCLUSION: Bone involvement has rarely been reported in classical KS though 4.5% of the patients were affected when it was systematically sought. Treatment of symptomatic lesions requires radiotherapy or chemotherapy.
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ranking = 4
keywords = bone
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3/600. Epithelioid cell histiocytoma: a simulant of vascular and melanocytic neoplasms.

    Epithelioid cell histiocytoma (ECH) is an unusual and still poorly recognized variant of benign fibrous histiocytoma. Epithelioid cell histiocytoma differs from most benign fibrous histiocytomas in five important ways: the predominance of epithelioid cells, relative lack of secondary elements (such as giant cells, foamy, or hemosiderin-laden macrophages), relative sharp circumscription, prominent vascularity, and centering in the papillary dermis in most cases. A strong resemblance to melanocytic and vascular lesions has been noted, and a recent case was reported with features suggesting endothelial origin. Fifteen new cases of ECH, including one example of the rare deep cellular variant, are presented herein, with emphasis on features mimicking vascular and melanocytic neoplasms. Labeling with endothelial markers, including previously unreported CD-31 labeling, showed abundant vascular staining, which may be challenging to interpret, but which does not indicate an endothelial origin of ECH.
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ranking = 20.626214083763
keywords = macrophage
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4/600. Basal cell carcinoma with massive ossification.

    We report a case of basal cell carcinoma with massive ossification in a 66-year-old white man. Ossification in various benign and malignant neoplasms have been reported including basal cell carcinomas, in which ossifications are seen in small foci or peripheral rim of the tumor. However, in our case, massive ossification is seen throughout the tumor, and only small areas of the periphery of the tumor show diagnostic histology. Therefore, this case might have presented a diagnostic difficulty or been misdiagnosed as an osteoma cutis if a smaller incisional or punch biopsy had been performed. The phenomenon of bone formation itself is not specific for any diagnostic entity, and therefore an underlying lesion should be carefully sought in case of secondary ossification.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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5/600. Verruciform xanthoma associated with squamous cell carcinoma.

    Verruciform xanthoma (VX) is a rare lesion of unknown etiology that is typically solitary and predominantly located within the oral cavity. Less commonly, they arise on the skin, with the majority of cases occurring in anogenital sites. They can be confused clinically with verruca vulgaris, condyloma, leukoplakia, verrucous carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. Histologic features include acanthosis with uniform elongation of the rete ridges and xanthomatous cells that lie in and are typically confined to the papillary dermis. Although epidermal atypia is not a characteristic finding, we describe an unusual case of VX that has features of both VX and squamous cell carcinoma. In addition, there was a VX with typical histologic characteristics located at a separate site in the same patient. This case is also the first to our knowledge to be reported on the neck and axilla and is the third case associated with cutaneous graft versus host disease secondary to bone marrow transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
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keywords = bone
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6/600. Epidermal naevus syndrome and hypophosphataemic rickets: description of a patient with central nervous system anomalies and review of the literature.

    The epidermal naevus syndrome (ENS) is a rare dermatological condition consisting of congenital epidermal nevi associated with anomalies in the central nervous system, bones, eyes, hear or genito-urinary system. We report a new case of ENS associated with hypophosphataemic rickets. The girl was born with a mixed-type epidermal naevus and skeletal anomalies. Hypophosphataemic rickets was diagnosed at the age of 2.5 years. At 14 years of age. MRI of the head demonstrated right brain hypotrophy, a left temporal arachnoid cyst and asymmetric lateral ventricles. We reviewed the literature and found 13 reported cases of ENS associated with hypophosphataemic rickets. Conclusion We report a further patient with epidermal naevus syndrome and hypophosphataemic rickets, followed from birth to the age of 15 years, who had structural central nervous system anomalies with normal intellectual functioning. A comprehensive neurological work up is recommended in patients with epidermal naevus syndrome.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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7/600. Sezary cells with hairy projections.

    A case of sezary syndrome where the sezary cells showed cytoplasmic hairy projections is reported. The patient had typical exfoliative erythematous dermatitis, high white cell count, atypical lymphocytes of T-phenotype with folded nuclei and bone marrow involvement. The ultra structure study showed cerebriform nucleus and cytoplasmic projections.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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8/600. Papillary formations in metastatic melanoma.

    Cytomorphologic features of melanoma can be extremely variable, in that they can mimic other poorly differentiated neoplasms. Ten cases of metastatic melanoma with distinct, cohesive, papillary tissue fragments observed in fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens are reported. These papillary fragments exhibited a central fibrovascular core with attached tumor cells, in a background of single scattered malignant cells, macrophages, and focal necrosis. The aspiration sites included regional or distant palpable lymph nodes, pancreas, bone, and skin. Nine cases had a histologic diagnosis of primary cutaneous melanoma, and in one case the primary skin tumor was detected after the diagnosis was established by FNA of the metastasis. Immunohistochemical studies (S-100 protein, HMB-45 antigen, and factor viii) were performed in four cases, and electron microscopy in one, confirming the diagnosis of melanoma. An awareness of this cytomorphologic variation of papillary formations in cytology preparations from metastatic melanoma is important and can prevent potential inaccurate interpretation.
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ranking = 21.626214083763
keywords = macrophage, bone
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9/600. Multiple basal cell carcinomas associated with hairy cell leukaemia.

    We report the case of a caucasian woman who, between the ages of 49 and 51 years, developed multiple (> 20) basal cell carcinomas (BCC). There was no family history of BCC. No abnormalities in the human homologue of the drosophila segment polarity gene patched (PTCH), glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1, or cytochrome P450 1A1 were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular analysis. There was, however, actinic damage of the skin in sun-exposed areas. The patient was diagnosed as having hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) at the age of 51 years, based upon leucocyte morphology as assessed by light and electron microscopy, tartrate-resistant acid leucocyte phosphatase (TRAP) staining, fluorescence activated cell scanning of peripheral blood leucocytes and bone marrow histology. As the leukaemia slowly progressed over a 3-month period, the patient developed four further BCCs. Given that HCL is characterized by a profound defect in T-cell function, it is conceivable that T-cell immune dysregulation can contribute to the pathogenesis of BCC, possibly enhancing the aetiological effect of ultraviolet irradiation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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10/600. Cutaneous waldenstrom macroglobulinemia in transformation.

    waldenstrom macroglobulinemia is a low-grade B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder of the elderly with characteristic monoclonal IgM-producing neoplastic infiltrates of the bone marrow, lymph node, and spleen. Cutaneous manifestations are usually nonspecific such as purpura, ulcers, and urticarial lesions. These lesions are caused by hyperviscosity of the blood, immune complex-mediated vascular damage, paraprotein deposition, and amyloid deposition. Specific skin lesions occur rarely and generally consist of translucent, flesh-colored papules composed of monoclonal IgM deposits. Rarely, there may be violaceous lesions composed of low-grade lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates characteristic of waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. Both cutaneous manifestations of the disease, as well as disease transformation to high-grade, large cell lymphoma are rare. We report two very unusual cases of waldenstrom macroglobulinemia with documented skin disease that demonstrated transformation to high-grade lymphoma. Both patients were elderly men with long-standing waldenstrom macroglobulinemia involving the bone marrow, who subsequently developed skin involvement by the disease. waldenstrom macroglobulinemia can rarely manifest as cutaneous disease, sometimes as a high-grade transformation of low-grade waldenstrom macroglobulinemia elsewhere. Distinction of cases of transformed waldenstrom macroglobulinemia from de novo cutaneous large cell lymphoma may be important, because the two entities are likely biologically different.
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ranking = 2
keywords = bone
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