Cases reported "Skin Neoplasms"

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1/511. Systemic sclerosis revealing T-cell lymphoma.

    We describe a case of systemic sclerosis (SSc) occurring together with malignant lymphoma. A 43-year-old man, who had noticed sclerodactyly 1 month before consultation, was admitted for progressive skin sclerosis on his forearms and chest. SSc was diagnosed. Immediately after admission, skin sclerosis rapidly extended to the neck and trunk, and subcutaneous tumors developed on the neck, chest and back. Skin sclerosis was prominent at the sites where subcutaneous tumors were present. The tumors were diagnosed as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of T-cell phenotype derived from soft tissue. Following 4 cycles of chemotherapy, he had complete remission and the skin sclerosis remarkably improved. It is possible that cytokines produced by T-cell lymphoma cells were responsible for the development of skin sclerosis in this case.
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2/511. Reactive angioendotheliomatosis in an infant.

    Reactive cutaneous angioendotheliomatosis (RCA) is an uncommon benign disease characterized by intravascular proliferation of endothelial cells. The observation of RCA in infants is exceedingly rare. We describe a case of RCA in a 3-month-old infant. The lesions were characterized by six small purpuric papules (1-2 mm in diameter), distributed on the thighs and neck. The general condition of the patient was good, with no lymphadenopathy, systemic involvement, or fever. The histopathologic features of a papule were characterized by the presence of cohesive aggregates of large mononucleated cells protruding into the lumina of dilated vessels and filling some of them completely. Neither an inflammatory infiltrate nor a proliferation of pericytes were present around blood vessels. Intravascular proliferating cells demonstrated positive staining for ulex europaeus agglutinin 1 (UEA-1) and for factor viii-RA and CD34 antigens. The course of the disease was unremarkable with persistence of the lesions for 8 months; no treatment was started.
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3/511. Verruciform xanthoma associated with squamous cell carcinoma.

    Verruciform xanthoma (VX) is a rare lesion of unknown etiology that is typically solitary and predominantly located within the oral cavity. Less commonly, they arise on the skin, with the majority of cases occurring in anogenital sites. They can be confused clinically with verruca vulgaris, condyloma, leukoplakia, verrucous carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. Histologic features include acanthosis with uniform elongation of the rete ridges and xanthomatous cells that lie in and are typically confined to the papillary dermis. Although epidermal atypia is not a characteristic finding, we describe an unusual case of VX that has features of both VX and squamous cell carcinoma. In addition, there was a VX with typical histologic characteristics located at a separate site in the same patient. This case is also the first to our knowledge to be reported on the neck and axilla and is the third case associated with cutaneous graft versus host disease secondary to bone marrow transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
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4/511. Basal cell carcinoma: what dentists need to know.

    BACKGROUND: Basal cell carcinoma, or BCC, is a malignant epithelial tumor of the skin, commonly seen in the head and neck. Because dentists routinely evaluate the head and neck, the authors present three examples of BCC of the face and jaw to help clinicians recognize the condition. They also provide a literature review regarding BCC's etiology, classification, treatment and prevention. DESCRIPTION OF THE disease: Sun exposure plays an important role in the development of BCC. The most susceptible people are those with minimal skin pigmentation. BCC is more frequently seen in men than in women. The most common form of BCC is the nodular type, which, if untreated, eventually ulcerates and may result in extensive local tissue destruction. The three cases described in this article highlight the range of BCC severity. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: oral health care providers may play an important role in the recognition and diagnosis of BCC involving the head and neck. Early recognition and diagnosis may lead to management that results in improved cure rates, with reduced morbidity and reduced treatment costs.
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5/511. HPV 18-induced pigmented bowenoid papulosis of the neck.

    We describe the case of a 53-year-old man in whom pigmented bowenoid papulosis developed on the skin of the neck. By polymerase chain reaction with general primers for genital human papillomaviruses (HPV) and subsequent restriction enzyme cleavage we could demonstrate HPV 18-related dna in two biopsy specimens of the pigmented papules. To our knowledge, this report represents the first case of HPV 18-induced extragenital bowenoid papulosis of the neck.
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6/511. Giant cavernous hemangioma of the scalp.

    In this article, a quite rare giant cavernous hemangioma located in right frontoparietal region of a 16 year-old boy is presented. Cavernous hemangiomas are commonly seen in extremities, neck, face and sometimes scalp, cutaneous or subcutaneous in localization. Giant cavernous hemangioma in the right frontoparietal region have been seen in two cases so far. In this article, we discussed the differential diagnosis, characteristics and therapy methods of giant cavernous hemangioma of the scalp.
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7/511. Cicatricial fibromatosis mimics metastatic medulloblastoma.

    Cicatricial fibromatoses usually occur in the anterior abdominal wall or in the extremities, but rarely in the scalp or the soft tissues of the neck. We report a case of desmoid fibromatosis that developed in a 15-year-old boy 8 months after surgery for cerebellar medulloblastoma.
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8/511. poems syndrome: cicatricial alopecia as an unusual cutaneous manifestation associated with an underlying plasmacytoma.

    poems syndrome is a rare condition with cutaneous manifestations commonly including angiomas, hypertrichosis, hyperpigmentation, and thickening of the skin. We describe a male patient with a 2-year history of cervical lymphadenopathy, erythematous thickening of the skin on the neck, and progressive walking difficulties. The patient had an occipital erythema with scarring alopecia and sparse follicular pustules at the edge of the lesion. Further investigation revealed symmetric polyneuropathy, hepatosplenomegaly, monoclonal gammopathy, subclinical thyreopathy, and an osteolytic bone lesion of the skull. Histologically, a plasmacytoma with lambda cell restriction was found. The overlying skin showed marked fibrosis, with loss of hair follicles, and a plasma cell infiltrate of polyclonal origin. The cervical lymph nodes showed histologic characteristics of multicentric Castleman's disease, and the skin of the neck showed thickening and vasoproliferation. There was no evidence of further plamacytomas. After excision of the plasmacytoma and postoperative irradiation, the symptoms gradually resolved within a few months. A cicatricial lesion remained on the occiput without further folliculitis or hair loss on the rest of the scalp. This case illustrates the reactive character of poems syndrome as a paraneoplastic syndrome in myeloma patients.
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9/511. Multiple piloleiomyomas associated with solitary angioleiomyoma.

    A 58 year-old male had reddish scattered papules strictly confined to the right side of his upper back and neck, right shoulder, and right upper arm. Additionally, he also noticed a subcutaneous nodule on his left thigh. Histopathological examinations revealed that the papules on the back, nape of the neck, shoulder, and arm were multiple piloleiomyomas, as shown by the proliferation of bundles of smooth muscles in the dermis. The subcutaneous nodule of the thigh was angioleiomyoma with a well-circumscribed lesion composed of smooth muscles and blood vessels. Ipsilaterality and segmentality of the distribution of the papules of piloleiomyomas and probable family history that his mother had similar papules with a similar distribution suggest the nevoid character of our case. Piloleiomyomas are often reported to be associated with leiomyoma of the uterus or other organs. This is the first reported case of multiple piloleiomyomas with solitary angioleiomyoma in the literature.
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10/511. FDG PET-negative liver metastases of a malignant melanoma and FDG PET-positive hurthle cell tumor of the thyroid.

    A Hurthle cell tumor (oncocytoma) of the thyroid presented as a hypermetabolic focus in a fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) study which was performed as staging procedure in a patient with malignant melanoma. This finding led to the initial diagnosis of a metastasis. In contrast, multiple liver metastases, seen on MRI and sonography, did not show any increased FDG uptake. Cytology results of one liver mass confirmed a melanoma metastasis, and of the neck mass, a Hurthle cell tumor. The Hurthle cell tumor was, based on clinical evidence, thought to be benign. This is the first description of a FDG PET-positive benign Hurthle cell tumor, with FDG PET-negative liver metastases of a malignant melanoma, in the same patient.
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