Cases reported "Skull Fractures"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/10. Pituitary insufficiency after penetrating injury to the sella turcica.

    We report a 28-year-old male patient with a pituitary insufficiency after a simple fracture of the sella turcica. He was injured by a long nail that punctured the lower jaw. No fracture other than that of the sella turcica was detected. An endocrinological examination revealed both anterior and pituitary dysfunction and diabetes insipidus that continued for about two months.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/10. Occult craniocerebral injuries from dog bites in young children.

    Although dog bite injuries to the head and scalp of children occur frequently, penetrating dog bite wounds to the cranial vault occur only occasionally and may go unnoticed on initial examination. Substantial morbidity and mortality can ensue if these penetrating injuries are not detected and treated. The authors detail the evaluation of dog bites of the scalp in young children. They highlight the ease with which puncture wounds of the calvarium may be missed during physical examination as a result of scalp displacement at the time of puncture. The cranial puncture may not be large and may later be covered by scalp that returns to its native position. Well-scrutinized skull films and a careful, methodical physical examination are advocated. Recognized craniocerebral injuries should be explored. Depressed cranial fractures should be irrigated, debrided, and elevated. Dural tears should be repaired. Expedient management is necessary to prevent meningitis and its associated sequelae.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/10. pneumocephalus and presumed meningitis following inconspicuous penetrating periocular trauma.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of serious intracranial complications in an adolescent youth following a seemingly trivial periocular injury. methods: An adolescent youth was examined and discharged after a small penetrating injury to his left medial canthus. He later presented with blurred vision, nausea and mild pyrexia and underwent a computed tomography (CT) scan of the head and orbits as well as a lumbar puncture. RESULTS: The CT scan revealed a fracture in the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone and the medial orbital wall, as well as pneumocephalus. The lumbar puncture revealed 3000 white cells/mm3 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). After treatment with meningitic doses of intravenous antibiotics, a significant improvement was noted. CONCLUSIONS: A CT scan, instead of an ordinary head radiograph, may be considered as a first-choice mode of diagnosis in evaluating even inconspicuous penetrating periocular wounds. Early administration of meningitic doses of antibiotics may significantly improve prognosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/10. Bloody cerebrospinal fluid: traumatic tap or child abuse?

    A central nervous system dysfunction of nontraumatic etiology was initially suspected in three cases of shaken baby syndrome. blood contaminating the cerebrospinal fluid was attributed to a traumatic lumbar puncture. Failure to detect retinal hemorrhages contributed to the misdiagnosis. Emergency physicians must consider the diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome in a critically ill infant with bloody cerebrospinal fluid. ophthalmoscopy should be done routinely in these patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/10. Lawn dart injury in children: report of two cases.

    Two cases of intracranial penetration by lawn darts are presented in this report. Both patients were children who developed infectious sequelae following primary closure of cutaneous puncture wounds. These injuries suggest that the darts produced a high-energy impact force that resulted in skull fractures and focal cerebral injury. When children present with puncture wounds or lacerations produced by lawn darts, intracranial penetration must be ruled out, using appropriate medical imaging. parents should be advised regarding the need for medical reassessment should fever, headache, or local signs of infection occur.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/10. Major dog attack injuries in children.

    Children are frequently admitted to a hospital with injuries sustained as a result of being attacked by a dog. Over a 5-year period (1977 to 1981), 57 such patients have been treated at the Winnipeg Children's Hospital. Half of the dog attack victims were 5 years or younger with injuries occurring more often in boys (55%). The majority of patients (95%) sustained puncture wounds and lacerations to the face (77%) and extremities (23%). In three of the cases, the dog attack victims presented with peritonitis secondary to bowel perforation and were treated successfully. A fourth child died as a result of his injuries prior to reaching the hospital. In the past, much attention has been focused on soft tissue injuries and their cosmetic repair. It is also important to recognize that the small child is particularly vulnerable to dog maulings from which the injuries sustained may be life threatening or lethal. Prevention seems to be the only rational approach to solving this problem.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/10. Epidural hematoma communicating with cephalhematoma in a neonate.

    The author reports a unique case of a neonate with a depressed skull fracture detected immediately below a cephalhematoma complicated with an epidural hematoma. The epidural hematoma communicating with the cephalhematoma through a depressed skull fracture disappeared after the cephalhematoma was punctured for aspiration, and the depressed fracture reduced spontaneously 6 months thereafter.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/10. Sagittal sinus occlusion, caused by an overlying depressed cranial fracture, presenting with late signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension: case report.

    A case of delayed signs of intracranial hypertension after open depressed cranial fracture occluding the superior sagittal sinus is reported. Elevating depressed fractures overlying a cranial venous sinus is hazardous. Conservative management of the intracranial hypertension, including repeated lumbar punctures, led to an unimpaired outcome. The options of management of delayed problems caused by traumatic venous occlusion are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/10. Transvenous embolization of high flow carotid cavernous fistula: a case report.

    We treated a patient with a high flow traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) by embolization using detachable balloons and metallic coils, by transarterial and transvenous approaches. The patient was a 20-year-old woman who had fractures in the skull base from a traffic accident. She was admitted to our hospital one month after the accident due to exophthalmos, chemosis, and periorbital bruit. Cerebral angiograms demonstrated left traumatic CCF and steal phenomenon of blood flow. Balloon embolization by transarterial approach performed three times was unsuccessful, probably because of balloon puncture due to bone fragments. Embolization using metalic coils via the superior ophthalmic vein route was then attempted. As a result of this approach, complete obliteration of CCF was obtained, and clinical symptoms subsided within a few days. Treatment of CCF by transvenous approach is one alternative when transarterial occlusion is difficult.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/10. Puncture wound of the eyelid causing brain abscess.

    A case of brain abscess following an apparently trival puncture wound to the eyelid is presented to emphasize the importance of meticulous examination of eye wounds in children to look for penetration into the cranial vault. Any suggestion of such penetrating injury either by history, examination, or X-ray should dictate neurosurgical consultation, and immediate local culture and debridement of the wound. If nonoperative management is elected, a careful watch must be kept for signs of infection, which dictate early exploration, and broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms common to penetrating skull trauma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Skull Fractures'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.