Cases reported "Skull Fractures"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/57. Subdural and intraventricular traumatic tension pneumocephalus: case report.

    Simple pneumocephalus most frequently arises as a complication of a head injury in which a compound basal skull fracture with tearing of the meninges allows entry of air into the cranial cavity. It can also follow a neurosurgical operation. Tension traumatic pneumocephalus with intraventricular extension is an extremely rare, potentially lethal condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. We report the case of subdural and intraventricular accidental tension pneumocephalus occurring in a 26-year-old man as a result of skull fracture. This case is combined with rhinorrhea and meningitis that suggest some difficulties to treat. The operative procedure associated with medical treatment was performed and a good result was obtained.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = subdural
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/57. Craniofacial trauma in children.

    Craniofacial trauma is relatively uncommon in children, but the potential involvement of the structures at the base of the skull and the intracranial space makes it important for physicians to understand the potential dangers presented by such injuries. This report delineates the different types of injury that can damage the upper facial skeleton and the brain of a child. The author reviews initial management and diagnosis of such injuries and examines the approach to definitive reconstructive surgery using three case studies as examples for discussion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0071388863698194
keywords = space
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/57. Superior orbital fissure syndrome: current management concepts.

    The superior orbital fissure syndrome is an uncommon complication of craniofacial fractures: middle-third facial fractures and lesions of the retrobulbar space. This article reviews the anatomy and etiology of the superior orbital fissure as it relates to pathophysiology and physical findings. Cases reported in the literature are reviewed, emphasizing diagnosis and established treatment options. Two cases are presented and their management discussed, including the use of pre- and postoperative steroids as an adjunct to standard fracture reduction and stabilization therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0071388863698194
keywords = space
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/57. pneumocephalus. A sign of intracranial involvement in orbital fracture.

    Fractures of the orbit resulting from blunt or penetrating injury that involve the paranasal sinuses may tear the dura and allow air to enter the cranial cavity (pneumocephalus). pneumocephalus is sometimes the only sign of intracranial involvement. It is characteristically delayed in onset and clinically unsuspected, so that routine follow-up roentgenograms of patients with orbitosinus fractures may be the only means of assuring early detection. Roentgenographically, the air may be seen in spidural, subdural subarachnoid, intracerebral, or intraventricular locations. Prophylactic parenterally administered antibiotics may prevent intracranial infection. However, since about 25% of patients still develop meningitis, surgical repair of the dural fistula is often necessary.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = subdural
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/57. Tracer accumulation in a subdural hygroma: case report.

    A surgically proven case of traumatic subdural hygroma gave a "positive" image during 111In-DTPA cisternography, This was probably secondary to a communication between the subdural and subarchnoid spaces.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6.0071388863698
keywords = subdural, space
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/57. Post-traumatic orbital cellulitis.

    orbital cellulitis is uncommon. It may arise as a sequel to eyelid infection, or from direct spread of infection from the paranasal sinuses; it may be of odontogenic origin and has been reported after meningitis and after nasoorbital fractures with pre-existing sinusitis. Clinically, orbital cellulitis is of great importance, as it is a severe disease with potentially disastrous consequences. It may lead to optic neuritis, optic atrophy, blindness, cavernous sinus thrombosis, superior orbital fissure syndrome, meningitis, subdural empyema, and even death. We report two cases of severe post-traumatic orbital cellulitis with subperiosteal abscesses. These were managed surgically and vision was preserved. We describe the anatomy, a classification of orbital infection, and the importance of multidisciplinary management of these cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = subdural
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/57. Spinal pneumorrhachis.

    The term pneumorrhachis refers to the presence of air in the spinal canal. There are only a few previously reported cases in the literature. A case of air within the cervical and lumbar subarachnoid spaces, and a second case of air within the cervical subarachnoid space due to traumatic pneumocephalus are presented in this study.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.014277772739639
keywords = space
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/57. Chronic post-traumatic erosion of the skull base.

    Delayed post-traumatic erosion of the skull base is reported in three patients who presented as adults with cerebrospinal fluid fistulae and a history of recurrent meningitis. These skull defects were associated with herniation of the subarachnoid space into the diploe of the skull base, the paranasal sinuses and the orbit. This rare complication of head injury is assumed to have occurred as the result of a dural tear at the time of trauma. Its site probably determines whether a resulting meningocele widens the intradiploic space or broaches the cranial floor.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.014277772739639
keywords = space
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/57. Leptomeningeal cyst: early diagnosis by color Doppler imaging.

    A newborn with a leptomeningeal cyst over the anterior fontanelle due to birth trauma is described. color Doppler flow sonograms were helpful to diagnose the leptomeningocele in its early stages and to differentiate it from a cephalhematoma or subgaleal haemorrhage by demonstrating cerebro-fugal flow in an arterial connection between the extracranial fluid collection and the dural space.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0071388863698194
keywords = space
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/57. Ultra rapid spontaneous resolution of acute posttraumatic subdural hematomas in patient with temporal linear fracture.

    We report a case of 57 year-old man with documented posttraumatic acute subdural hematoma and a linear temporal bone fracture. He suffered from a blunt head injury and presented with sudden loss of consciousness. Within 2 hours he became alert and oriented. Follow-up CT scan of brain 2 hours after the initial one showed resolution and redistribution of the subdural hematoma.To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature about spontaneous resolution of an acute subdural hematoma in a patient with a linear fracture and the fastest resolution period. In this article, the authors discuss the underlying pathophysiology of this uncommon phenomenon.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = subdural
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Skull Fractures'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.