Cases reported "Sneezing"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/13. Sneeze-induced visual and ocular motor dysfunction.

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this report is to describe two neuroophthalmic complications that are related by their temporal association with a sneeze. DESIGN: We describe observational case reports of two patients. methods: Both patients were examined, and their conditions were diagnosed and treated according to standard indications for each neuroophthalmic condition. RESULTS: The first case describes a patient who had previously undergone intracranial surgery, including removal of the clivus and later developed a trochlear nerve paresis after a sneeze. The second case describes a patient who repeatedly demonstrates transient decreased perfusion to his right central retinal artery and an associated afferent papillary defect after sneezing. CONCLUSION: The mechanical and hemodynamic forces involved in sneezing are formidable and may cause permanent cranial neuropathy or temporarily alter ocular blood flow in certain patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/13. Intractable paroxysmal sneezing.

    Intractable paroxysmal sneezing is a rare disease primarily affecting teenage girls. We present the case of a 12-year-old girl who demonstrated the classical features of intractable paroxysmal sneezing of psychogenic origin. Most of the reported cases are psychogenic in origin, but a number of other conditions may cause intractable paraoxysmal sneeze. Apart from a detailed history, clinical examination and relevant investigations, topical nasal anaesthesia should be tried for control of symptoms--that will help to differentiate psychogenic sneezing from organic sneezing. A timely diagnosis can avoid unnecessary medical trials, parental anxiety and poor school performance, as most of the patients are very young.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2360568058344
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/13. Paroxysmal sneezing in children: two new cases.

    Paroxysmal sneezing is an uncommon condition primarily affecting adolescents. Most of the reported cases were thought to be psychogenic, and only two were felt to be due to nasal sensitivity. This paper reports two adolescents with paroxysmal sneezing, neither of whom had apparent psychologic or emotional problems. In one child the sneezing continued during sleep. The other child was successfully treated with topical nasal anesthesia. Both children were felt to have nasal sensitivity as the etiology of their paroxysmal sneezing. The evaluation of the patient with paroxysmal sneezing requires a thorough history and physical examination. One must not assume that every case of paroxysmal sneezing is of psychogenic origin. Topical nasal anesthesia should be tried for control of intractable paroxysmal sneezing.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.9442272233376
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/13. Intractable psychogenic sneezing: two case reports.

    sneezing is usually the physiologic response to nasal irritation but intractable paroxysmal sneezing is very uncommon. Majority of cases of intractable sneezing are reported among adolescents and are psychogenic in origin. We report two adolescent girls with intractable paroxysmal sneezing in whom the removal of psychogenic stressors resulted incomplete remission.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2360568058344
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/13. Hypercellularity of the mastoid as a cause of spontaneous pneumocephalus.

    In this paper two cases are reported in which spontaneous entry of air into the head appears to have occurred through a hypercellular mastoid air cell system. In both these cases forceful sneezing and nose blowing were considered contributory factors. They underwent surgical repair of the bony defects which, combined with less vigorous nose blowing, has affected a successful repair. The aetiology of pneumocephalus is discussed and a review of the pertinent literature is also presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/13. Orbital emphysema after sneezing.

    Orbital emphysema is a rare condition in the absence of trauma or sinus disease. We report two cases of orbital emphysema caused by sneezing. The patients presented with sudden unilateral eyelid swelling after sneezing. Otorhinolaryngologic and ophthalmic examinations were accompanied by computed tomography (CT). Patient examination disclosed crepitant eyelid swelling, ptosis, and mild unilateral exophthalmos. CT demonstrated areas of emphysema in the orbit. One patient had history of past trauma. The other patient had a history of nasal surgery and concurrent chronic sinusitis. sneezing may cause orbital emphysema in patients with a history of old periorbital trauma or surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2360568058344
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/13. Sneeze related area in the medulla: localisation of the human sneezing centre?

    sneezing is a rarely explored symptom in neurological practice. In the cat, a sneeze evoking centre is located in the medulla. The existence of a sneezing centre has not been confirmed in humans. A case with abnormal sneezing secondary to a strategic infarct in the right latero-medullary region is presented. A 66 year old man suddenly presented paroxysmal sneezing followed by ataxia, right sided motor and sensory symptoms, and hoarseness. The application of stimuli to the right nasal fossa did not evoke sneezing nor the wish to sneeze. The same stimuli to the contralateral nasal fossa evoked normal sneezing. The preservation of the superficial sensitivity of the nasal fossa indicates that the lesion was localised in the hypothetical human sneezing centre, very close to the spinal trigeminal tract and nucleus. This centre appears to be bilateral and functionally independent on both sides.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.7081704175032
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/13. Expulsion of a lacrimal dacryolith by sneezing: a rare event.

    PURPOSE: To describe the case of a man presenting with intermittent epiphora of the right eye and a low grade dacryocystitis due to a dacryolith. methods/RESULTS: He was treated conservatively and was offered a dacryocystorhinostomy. A few weeks before surgery, he developed swelling and pain over the right medial canthus followed by violent sneezing with spontaneous extrusion of the dacryolith. DISCUSSION: The authors propose that the dacryolith fragmented spontaneously and once it reached the nasal cavity, was expelled by violent sneezing to the nostril, a mechanism not previously reported. CONCLUSIONS: Reformation of dacryolith is a likely possibility, and recurrence of symptoms in such cases may ultimately require a dacryocystorhinostomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2360568058344
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/13. Delayed traumatic ocular emphysema: a case report.

    A 47-year-old man sustained fractures of the left orbita and zygomatic bone after a fall. He was advised to visit an oral and maxillofacial department for more detailed evaluation and treatment, but ignored the advice. Four days later, after sneezing and blowing his nose, he presented severe exophthalmos, diplopia, and reduction of vision. Two days after the symptoms presented he asked for oral and maxillofacial surgery consultation. He refused any surgical intervention and was treated conservatively. The recovery was slow and 1 week later he was discharged with slight esthetic problems.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/13. Factitious sneezing.

    We report a case of hysterical, intractable paroxysmal sneezing in an adolescent girl. The patient had been observed by two pediatricians, an allergist, an emergency room physician, and a chiropractor. She had been treated with antihistamines, epinephrine, corticosteroid nasal spray, and a 1-week course of an oral corticosteroid without improvement. She was referred for evaluation of an allergic etiology before continuing her workup with a computed tomographic head scan. The patient had been sneezing almost daily for 3 mo up to 2000 times a day. The patient did not sneeze at night. She had nasal congestion but no rhinorrhea or eye symptoms. She did not sneeze during the interview. The results of a physical examination were normal except for mild obesity. No organic cause was found. Most cases of intractable paroxysmal sneezing reported in the literature occur in adolescents and appear to have a psychogenic etiology. The problem was discussed with the child and parents, and psychologic therapy was recommended. Considerable decrease in sneezing subsequently occurred, but the parents credited this is further chiropractic therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.4721136116688
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Sneezing'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.